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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Jim Dearing (search for this): chapter 1.14
ng their handkerchiefs; citizens on the roadside are bidding them Godspeed. They reach the heights, but not a moment too soon. Right gallantly do the foam-flecked horses pull up the incline. The Captain rides in front to locate the position of the guns, and ere the whirlwind of dust over the roadway over which they have traveled had well nigh settled to its mother earth, the welcome sound of the first gun is heard as it throws its shell into the head of the enemy's column. Another shell falls in their midst. They waver, confusion reigns in their ranks, and the enemy turned and fled. The successful charge of Graham's battery was followed up in gallant style by the small body of cavalry under General Dearing, who attacked the retreating enemy, taking a number of prisoners and capturing one piece of artillery and two caissons abandoned by the enemy, which he brought to Captain Graham. The gun proved to be a superior howitzer and was attached to his battery to the end of the war.
Edward Graham (search for this): chapter 1.14
the welcome sound of the first gun is heard as it throws its shell into the head of the enemy's column. Another shell falls in their midst. They waver, confusion reigns in their ranks, and the enemy turned and fled. The successful charge of Graham's battery was followed up in gallant style by the small body of cavalry under General Dearing, who attacked the retreating enemy, taking a number of prisoners and capturing one piece of artillery and two caissons abandoned by the enemy, which he ls in their midst. They waver, confusion reigns in their ranks, and the enemy turned and fled. The successful charge of Graham's battery was followed up in gallant style by the small body of cavalry under General Dearing, who attacked the retreating enemy, taking a number of prisoners and capturing one piece of artillery and two caissons abandoned by the enemy, which he brought to Captain Graham. The gun proved to be a superior howitzer and was attached to his battery to the end of the war.