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Edward's Depot (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
st. He was assigned to duty at Vicksburg in November, 1862, but he ever afterward followed with pride the gallant and true boy company (Parker's Battery) which served to the close of the war and surrendered at the general collapse at Appomattox. The boy company (Parker's Battery) was but one of many such companies of boys organized during the great war, and I will now mention one company, composed entirely of Mississippi boys, the captain of which was Captain W. A. Montgomery, now of Edwards, Miss., who was only about eighteen years of age. This company, after the fall of Vicksburg, served under my command for a long time. Captain Montgomery had about thirty dare-devil boys who lived almost all the time inside of the lines of the enemy. They were invaluable as scouts. The only trouble with them was that they were always too anxious to fight and follow their dare-devil captain in a charge. They never counted the odds as a rule, but were as reckless as reckless boys could be. Du
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
enerally with the consent of their parents, for otherwise the boys would have been likely to have run off and enlisted anyway. The company was a pretty green one, including the captain, lieutenants, drivers and all the members of the battery; they had had little or no experience in drilling, in caring for the horses attached to the guns, and in every respect was a very crude organization. After General Lee had driven General McClellan from the gates of Richmond and began to move towards Maryland in the first campaign of invasion across the Potomac, the boy company reported to Colonel S. D. Lee, who had a battalion of three batteries of artillery, all of whom had seen service in battle. When on the march towards the battlefield of Second Manassas the boy company reported to make the fourth battery of the battalion. When the battery reported Colonel Lee was shocked that such a company of immature boys should be sent to him while on the march against the enemy. He, however, took t
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
The famous boy Company of Richmond, commanded by Captain W. W. Parker—the Confederate Women— their encouragement and efforts were behind the movements of the men in the field. In the Great War Between the States, from 1861 to 1865, the Confederate States, because of the great odds in numbers and resources of every kind, including recruits from Europe entering the armies of the Union, had to have in the Confederate armies every musket available in its defense. It was a common remark during great war, and they stand only second to my love and veneration for the women of the South. Our splendid Southern women, Confederate women and their daughters, never tire in their patriotism. They are now all over the territory of the ex-Confederate States, placing monuments at every county seat to commemorate the valor, patriotism and sacrifice of the Confederate soldier. In overcoming almost insurmountable difficulties they have erected and have lately unveiled the splendid monument in Ric
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
e women of the South during the Civil War. These splendid traits were more conspicuous immediately after the war, amid the ruin, desolation and despoiling legislation which followed its close. Old acquaintances. At the recent reunion at Richmond, Va., of the United Confederate Vetrans, the writer had vividly recalled to his memory and met many of the young Confederate soldiers, whose heads were just beginning to grow gray, belonging to a company of artillery from Richmond, composed nearly entirely of beardless boys from fourteen to eighteen years of age. The company was known as the Parker Battery, commanded by Captain W. W. Parker, a very religious member of one of the leading Methodist Churches of Richmond, Va. It was also known as the boy company because only the officers were of age, and possibly a few other members. It was organized in the late spring or summer of 1862, when General McClellan with the Union Army was hammering at the very gates of the city. At the time th
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
erved to turn the tide of battle and consumate the victory. It was not of Colonel Lee, but his splendid battalion of artillery, including the boy company, that turned the tide of battle. Not long after the battle of the Second Manassas came Sharpsburg, for one day the bloodiest battle of the entire war. Here, as at the battle of the Second Manassas, the battalion of artillery was in the thickest of the battle, near the Dunker Church, close to the bloody cornfield and the bloody angle. The and reunion he met six or eight of the boy company, who live in Richmond, and he was deeply touched as they came around him, and put their hands and arms about him and recalled the scenes and incidents of the great battles of Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. Not long after this Colonel Lee was promoted and moved for service to the West. He was assigned to duty at Vicksburg in November, 1862, but he ever afterward followed with pride the gallant and true boy company (Parker's Battery) which serve
Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
e Confederate Army towards the close of the war that did not have nearly a score of boys under eighteen years of age in their ranks. I glory in the boys of our Southland, for I learned this during the great war, and they stand only second to my love and veneration for the women of the South. Our splendid Southern women, Confederate women and their daughters, never tire in their patriotism. They are now all over the territory of the ex-Confederate States, placing monuments at every county seat to commemorate the valor, patriotism and sacrifice of the Confederate soldier. In overcoming almost insurmountable difficulties they have erected and have lately unveiled the splendid monument in Richmond to our beloved President Davis. It did my heart good when the veterans of Mississippi recently in reunion at Meridian passed a resolution to ask the Legislature of Mississippi to erect a monument to commemorate the unsurpassed patriotism of the Confederate women during the bloody Civil War.
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.36
nd he was deeply touched as they came around him, and put their hands and arms about him and recalled the scenes and incidents of the great battles of Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. Not long after this Colonel Lee was promoted and moved for service to the West. He was assigned to duty at Vicksburg in November, 1862, but he ever afterward followed with pride the gallant and true boy company (Parker's Battery) which served to the close of the war and surrendered at the general collapse at Appomattox. The boy company (Parker's Battery) was but one of many such companies of boys organized during the great war, and I will now mention one company, composed entirely of Mississippi boys, the captain of which was Captain W. A. Montgomery, now of Edwards, Miss., who was only about eighteen years of age. This company, after the fall of Vicksburg, served under my command for a long time. Captain Montgomery had about thirty dare-devil boys who lived almost all the time inside of the lines o
Stephen D. Lee (search for this): chapter 1.36
e run off and enlisted anyway. The company was a pretty green one, including the captain, lieutenants, drivers and all the members of the battery; they had had little or no experience in drilling, in caring for the horses attached to the guns, and in every respect was a very crude organization. After General Lee had driven General McClellan from the gates of Richmond and began to move towards Maryland in the first campaign of invasion across the Potomac, the boy company reported to Colonel S. D. Lee, who had a battalion of three batteries of artillery, all of whom had seen service in battle. When on the march towards the battlefield of Second Manassas the boy company reported to make the fourth battery of the battalion. When the battery reported Colonel Lee was shocked that such a company of immature boys should be sent to him while on the march against the enemy. He, however, took the situation in at once, took hold of the company and drilled and disciplined it in season and
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1.36
see a partial change toward their commander, I could see that I still had their dislike and that they thought I was too partial to their company, and would prefer that I would be more attentive to the other three batteries of the battalion. President Davis said of Colonel Lee in this battle: I have reason to believe that at the last great conflict on the field of Manassas, he served to turn the tide of battle and consumate the victory. It was not of Colonel Lee, but his splendid battalion of at every county seat to commemorate the valor, patriotism and sacrifice of the Confederate soldier. In overcoming almost insurmountable difficulties they have erected and have lately unveiled the splendid monument in Richmond to our beloved President Davis. It did my heart good when the veterans of Mississippi recently in reunion at Meridian passed a resolution to ask the Legislature of Mississippi to erect a monument to commemorate the unsurpassed patriotism of the Confederate women during t
J. Thompson Brown (search for this): chapter 1.36
day been where men only dare to go! Some of your company have been killed and many have been wounded, but recollect, that it is a soldier's fate to die! Now, every man of you who is willing to return to the field, step two paces to the front! The brave boys responded at once, described by another as follows: Weak, almost dazed by the scenes of horror through which we had passed, stern duty calls and we obey. The significant two paces is stepped and a volunteer section, led by Lieutenant J. Thompson Brown, return and moves to confront the now exultant enemy. Tasting ties. After the bloody battle of Sharpsburg, Colonel Lee let up on the boy company. He and they were ever afterwards friends. The little fellows loved their commander, and never failed to divide with him anything they had gathered in foraging which they might have on hand; he was the recipient of fruit, eggs, and even more substantial luxuries when there was any among the boys of Parker's Battery. Now he trea
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