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Corydon (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
Drink it down, marched to a point six miles from the river and went into camp for a brief rest. The rear guard of Johnson's Brigade, the last to cross the river, stopped on the margin of the stream long enough to burn the transprts and to wave their hats, bidding Hobson's pursuing cavalry, then on the other shore, good-by. Then, following the column, they sang: The race is not to them that's got The longest legs to run, Nor the battle to that people That shoots the biggest gun. At Corydon, fifteen miles north of the river, a force of militia, or home guards, formidable in numbers only, attempted to delay the march, but when the advance guard charged their barricade of fence rails in front and a regiment threatened their flank, they unhesitatingly fled. At Salem, thirty miles further north, there was a similar occurrence. Apparently the whole of Indiana was in arms, one blast upon a native's horn being worth a thousand men. The home guards were patriotic and commendably b
Blendon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
rned only one private dwelling, and even that one would have been left uninjured had not a hostile band made a fortress of it. Their sins were many, but burning houses, making war on women and children and mistreating prisoners were not among them. The March around Cincinnati. Dispersing or eluding all hostile forces, cutting telegraph wires and throwing out detachments to deceive the Federal officers, Morgan marched swiftly on and on, day and night, night and day, until he reached Harrison, Ohio, where he began to maneuver to mystify the commanding officer at Cincinnati. He had reason to believe that the city was garrisoned by a strong force under General Burnside, and that a supreme effort would be made to intercept and capture him when he should attempt to cross the Hamilton and Dayton Railroad. After two or three hours halt at Harrison the column moved directly toward Cincinnati, all detachments coming in before nightfall. Hoping that his previous demonstrations would in
Brandenburg (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
the brilliant Colonel Alston, Chief of Staff, sought nature's sweet restorer on the veranda of a roadside residence, and awoke to find himself in the hands of the pursuing Federal cavalry. From Bardstown the Confederates marched rapidly to Brandenburg, on the Ohio River, forty miles below Louisville. Crossing the River. When the column reached Brandenburg, early in the morning of July 8, General Morgan was delighted to find two good steamboats lying at the wharf, the transports havingBrandenburg, early in the morning of July 8, General Morgan was delighted to find two good steamboats lying at the wharf, the transports having been secured by two of his most adventuresome captains, Sam Taylor and Clay Meriwether, who had been sent in advance for that purpose. Impatient of delay, Morgan made immediate preparations to cross the river. A dense fog prevented his seeing what was on the other side, but he knew that a strong force of determined Federal cavalry was close upon his rear. A shot from a rifled cannon and a volley of musketry announced the presence of an unseen enemy on the Indiana shore. The disappearin
Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
ing troopers, he boldly and swiftly marched due north, leaving a strong force of Federal cavalry in his rear. Adhering to his policy of fighting, instead of avoiding, all troops that opposed him when advancing, Morgan was unfortunate on this great raid, even in Kentucky, where on former occasions he had been signally successful. On the Fourth of July he undertook to capture a small force of Michigan infantry occupying a naturally strong and skillfully-fortified position in a bend of the Green River. Replying to a demand for his surrender, the Commander, Colonel H. Moore, said: This is Independence Day. I shall not lower my flag without a fight. Having repeatedly assaulted the position, and lost in killed and wounded nearly one hundred of his most gallant men, the discomfited Morgan made a detour and marched away, leaving his dead and wounded comrades to the tender mercies of the Federal Commander, who was no less humane than he was brave. Marching to Lebanon, the raiders captu
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
he contrary notwithstanding. Hitherto the career of the cavalry chieftain had been brilliantly successful but the contemplated long ride from the sunny hills of Tennessee through Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio was to end in grave and almost irreparable disaster. In high feather and in full song Morgan's gallant young cavalrymen foron as to the location or strength of the enemy. Moreover, of the two thousand four hundred and sixty effective troopers with which he had started from far-away Tennessee, he had scarcely two thousand left. He could find sufficiently strenuous employment for this force without running into a labyrinth of unfamiliar streets and amtwo violins, a guitar and a banjo. The sentimental guitarist was softly singing Juanita, when he was interrupted by a rollicking fiddler who played The Hills of Tennessee. Simultaneourly another gay violinist broke one of his three strings in an attempt to play The Arkansaw Traveler, and then inconsiderately threw away the fiddl
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
sort to every strategem to avoid battle, fearing that while fighting one enemy another might overtake and assail him. The Ohio raid. Lee was marching toward Pennsylvania and Bragg, in danger of being overwhelmed by Rosecrans, directed Morgan tothreatening Louisville. Being essential a free lance, accustomed to independent action, Morgan determined to cross the Ohio River, General Bragg's order to the contrary notwithstanding. Hitherto the career of the cavalry chieftain had been brillianin the hands of the pursuing Federal cavalry. From Bardstown the Confederates marched rapidly to Brandenburg, on the Ohio River, forty miles below Louisville. Crossing the River. When the column reached Brandenburg, early in the morning of Jition such as the Ohio Raid the exchanging, or impressment, of horses is a military necessity. When Morgan crossed the Ohio River his men were riding fine Kentucky horses, many of them thoroughbred, peculiarly adapted to service on a long and exhaus
Springfield, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
If Morgan had 1,000 men, Lightning would gravely inform them that he had 2,000. Locating the detachments promiscuously, he would have the main column and detached squadrons marching in directions contrary to their objective points. Leaving Springfield, Morgan deflected from the straight northward route, hitherto pursued, and marched westward to Bardstown, threatening Louisville. By this time the rough riders had become weary and sleepy. While the column was making the night march from SprSpringfield to Bardstown, the brilliant Colonel Alston, Chief of Staff, sought nature's sweet restorer on the veranda of a roadside residence, and awoke to find himself in the hands of the pursuing Federal cavalry. From Bardstown the Confederates marched rapidly to Brandenburg, on the Ohio River, forty miles below Louisville. Crossing the River. When the column reached Brandenburg, early in the morning of July 8, General Morgan was delighted to find two good steamboats lying at the wharf,
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
nger of being overwhelmed by Rosecrans, directed Morgan to create a diversion by marching into Kentucky and threatening Louisville. Being essential a free lance, accustomed to independent action, Morgan determined to cross the Ohio River, General Brd, Morgan deflected from the straight northward route, hitherto pursued, and marched westward to Bardstown, threatening Louisville. By this time the rough riders had become weary and sleepy. While the column was making the night march from Springfiederal cavalry. From Bardstown the Confederates marched rapidly to Brandenburg, on the Ohio River, forty miles below Louisville. Crossing the River. When the column reached Brandenburg, early in the morning of July 8, General Morgan was deli column moved eastward to Vienna, where Ellsworth captured the telegraph operator and put himself in communication with Louisville and Indianapolis, sending the usual fiction regarding Morgan's movements and receiving desirable information as to thos
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
Following Morgan's plume through Indiana and Ohio. From the N. O. Picayune, October 13, 1907. Recollections of the last and greatest campaign of the famous Confederate chieftain. By George Dallas Mosgrove. There lived a knight, when knftain had been brilliantly successful but the contemplated long ride from the sunny hills of Tennessee through Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio was to end in grave and almost irreparable disaster. In high feather and in full song Morgan's gallant youngy unhesitatingly fled. At Salem, thirty miles further north, there was a similar occurrence. Apparently the whole of Indiana was in arms, one blast upon a native's horn being worth a thousand men. The home guards were patriotic and commendably b, but with encompassing regular troops. Even the women frowned, their voluble speech being uncomplimentary. Neither in Indiana nor in Ohio did Morgan's Rough Riders see any bright smiles to haunt them still. Unfortunately for Morgan his column
Indianapolis (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
ty miles further north, there was a similar occurrence. Apparently the whole of Indiana was in arms, one blast upon a native's horn being worth a thousand men. The home guards were patriotic and commendably brave, but their inexperience and lack of discipline rendered them ineffective when opposing the march of Morgan's veteran cavaliers. From Salem the column moved eastward to Vienna, where Ellsworth captured the telegraph operator and put himself in communication with Louisville and Indianapolis, sending the usual fiction regarding Morgan's movements and receiving desirable information as to those of the enemy. As the invaders advanced, marching rapidly day and night, the needlessly alarmed people fled from their homes, leaving doors wide open and cooked rations invitingly displayed in kitchen and dining hall, the quantity being great and the quality good. If the fleeting horsemen from Dixie fared sumptuously every day and night in a land where they had no friends, what must
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