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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.43
General Sam Houston. From the New York Herald, Dec. 29, 1907. Explanation of causes which led the soldier-governor to Forsake the three-months' bride to live with Cherokee Indian Tribe. Austin, Tex., Saturday, December 28, 1907. The mystery of that chapter in General Sam Houston's life which caused him to suddenly resign as Governor of the State of Tennessee and go into the wilds of the West, where he joined the Cherokee Indians, leaving behind a bride of three months, has been an eyer fruitful subject of discussion among the people who are familiar with the life of that strange man, who did so much in later years to win for Texas her independence. That there was a romance behind his mysterious withdrawal from civilization is well known and many have been the surmises as to the details. Thomas Boyers, an aged resident of Gallatin, Tenn., who was a friend of both Houston and his bride, has just thrown new light on the romance. He says: In the life of the cel
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.43
f every rank vied in attention to the distinguished couple; never before had the executive mansion been so graced. Part at manor house. After three months of what was to outward appearances a happy honeymoon, the bride went home on a visit. The Governor followed in a few days, and there at the manor house, where they were married, husband and wife parted forever. What passed no one knows, as the lips of both were ever afterward sealed on the subject. Governor Houston returned to Nashville and sent his resignation as Governor to his old comrade, General William Hall, Speaker of the Senate, who succeeded him. After resigning he went into the forest, and, forsaking civilization, lived with his old friends, the Cherokee Indians. The nation was startled to learn that in a day the Governor of a flourishing commonwealth had been transformed into an Indian brave. Eliza stands acquitted by me, General Houston said in a letter to a friend. I received her as a virtuous and chas
Austin (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.43
General Sam Houston. From the New York Herald, Dec. 29, 1907. Explanation of causes which led the soldier-governor to Forsake the three-months' bride to live with Cherokee Indian Tribe. Austin, Tex., Saturday, December 28, 1907. The mystery of that chapter in General Sam Houston's life which caused him to suddenly resign as Governor of the State of Tennessee and go into the wilds of the West, where he joined the Cherokee Indians, leaving behind a bride of three months, has been an eyer fruitful subject of discussion among the people who are familiar with the life of that strange man, who did so much in later years to win for Texas her independence. That there was a romance behind his mysterious withdrawal from civilization is well known and many have been the surmises as to the details. Thomas Boyers, an aged resident of Gallatin, Tenn., who was a friend of both Houston and his bride, has just thrown new light on the romance. He says: In the life of the cel
Gallatin, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.43
nown and many have been the surmises as to the details. Thomas Boyers, an aged resident of Gallatin, Tenn., who was a friend of both Houston and his bride, has just thrown new light on the romance. . Their courtship reads like an old romance. There was a stately house three miles from Gallatin, Tenn., on the bluffs of the Cumberland River. Here lived John Allen, an old fashioned country gespoke, there are only conjectures; his name never passed her lips. Meanwhile Houston came to Gallatin—Houston the soldier, friend and comrade of General Andrew Jackson; Houston the Governor, and altained a divorce on grounds of abandonment, and was afterward married to Dr. Elmore Douglas, of Gallatin. She met her death in the winter of 1862 in the opera house at Gallatin. She was there with hGallatin. She was there with her children, who were rehearsing for private theatricals. A trapdoor, having been carelessly left open, Mrs. Houston fell through it, suffering a fracture of the hip. She died shortly afterward
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.43
m finally to the West; his eventful course in Texas, fighting for the independence of the State; rising to the rank of commander-in-chief, and driving out the Mexicans; his election to the Presidency of Texas, and, after the annexation to the United States, his serving as Governor, and later as United States Senator, are all matters of history. In the early months of 1853 I met him at Washington, and was invited to his room at his boarding house. Very adroitly, after more than one interviewUnited States Senator, are all matters of history. In the early months of 1853 I met him at Washington, and was invited to his room at his boarding house. Very adroitly, after more than one interview, he led me to speak of his wife, and then succeeded question after question, many of them of the most trivial character, in regard to her. Mrs. Houston finally obtained a divorce on grounds of abandonment, and was afterward married to Dr. Elmore Douglas, of Gallatin. She met her death in the winter of 1862 in the opera house at Gallatin. She was there with her children, who were rehearsing for private theatricals. A trapdoor, having been carelessly left open, Mrs. Houston fell through it
Elmore Douglas (search for this): chapter 1.43
for the independence of the State; rising to the rank of commander-in-chief, and driving out the Mexicans; his election to the Presidency of Texas, and, after the annexation to the United States, his serving as Governor, and later as United States Senator, are all matters of history. In the early months of 1853 I met him at Washington, and was invited to his room at his boarding house. Very adroitly, after more than one interview, he led me to speak of his wife, and then succeeded question after question, many of them of the most trivial character, in regard to her. Mrs. Houston finally obtained a divorce on grounds of abandonment, and was afterward married to Dr. Elmore Douglas, of Gallatin. She met her death in the winter of 1862 in the opera house at Gallatin. She was there with her children, who were rehearsing for private theatricals. A trapdoor, having been carelessly left open, Mrs. Houston fell through it, suffering a fracture of the hip. She died shortly afterward.
Thomas Boyers (search for this): chapter 1.43
ddenly resign as Governor of the State of Tennessee and go into the wilds of the West, where he joined the Cherokee Indians, leaving behind a bride of three months, has been an eyer fruitful subject of discussion among the people who are familiar with the life of that strange man, who did so much in later years to win for Texas her independence. That there was a romance behind his mysterious withdrawal from civilization is well known and many have been the surmises as to the details. Thomas Boyers, an aged resident of Gallatin, Tenn., who was a friend of both Houston and his bride, has just thrown new light on the romance. He says: In the life of the celebrated Sam Houston, which is as romantic as any in the annals of fiction, there is no event of deeper interest than his first marriage. In every man's history there is a time when woman's influence is the determining force that makes or mars it. And in the life of Houston his meeting with Miss Allen and his subsequent mar
Andrew Jackson (search for this): chapter 1.43
y galloped off. She was well educated and her conversation, like herself, was at once sensible, graceful and dignified. In her train was one who never spoke of his love, feeling that his suit was hopeless. And him she loved, as she confessed to one of her bridesmaids on the eve of her wedding. Who the unknown suitor was, why he never spoke, there are only conjectures; his name never passed her lips. Meanwhile Houston came to Gallatin—Houston the soldier, friend and comrade of General Andrew Jackson; Houston the Governor, and always Houston the cavalier, booted and spurred, the glass of fashion and the mold of form. Surely there was never a lover whose honors clustered as thick around him; no wonder the unknown suitor hung back when such a gallant entered the list. He wooed and won and wedded the beautiful Miss Allen in January, 1820. One of the bridesmaids, who died only a few years ago, described to me all the details of the wedding. For weeks before she said, the bri
Sam Houston (search for this): chapter 1.43
General Sam Houston. From the New York Herald, Dec. 29, 1907. Explanation of causes which rce that makes or mars it. And in the life of Houston his meeting with Miss Allen and his subsequenysis of the physical and spiritual natures of Houston and his bride, rather than the wild rumors antions current at the time it occurred. General Houston, as I remember him, was a man powerfully his name never passed her lips. Meanwhile Houston came to Gallatin—Houston the soldier, friend ever afterward sealed on the subject. Governor Houston returned to Nashville and sent his resign brave. Eliza stands acquitted by me, General Houston said in a letter to a friend. I receivenation of the seeming mystery. To a man like Houston, all fire and passion, the constant rebuffs o bluff, the housemaid came and announced to Mrs. Houston that a stranger, tall man, was in the recepost trivial character, in regard to her. Mrs. Houston finally obtained a divorce on grounds of ab[8 more...]
William Hall (search for this): chapter 1.43
had the executive mansion been so graced. Part at manor house. After three months of what was to outward appearances a happy honeymoon, the bride went home on a visit. The Governor followed in a few days, and there at the manor house, where they were married, husband and wife parted forever. What passed no one knows, as the lips of both were ever afterward sealed on the subject. Governor Houston returned to Nashville and sent his resignation as Governor to his old comrade, General William Hall, Speaker of the Senate, who succeeded him. After resigning he went into the forest, and, forsaking civilization, lived with his old friends, the Cherokee Indians. The nation was startled to learn that in a day the Governor of a flourishing commonwealth had been transformed into an Indian brave. Eliza stands acquitted by me, General Houston said in a letter to a friend. I received her as a virtuous and chaste wife, and as such I pray God I may ever regard her; and I trust I ever
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