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Monterey (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.54
ged his sturdy men, not knowing nor caring what hostile force and appliances lay ready within to receive their onset. To find that force as speedily as possible and overwhelm it was the errand upon which they and their emulous comrades were afield so early. Here a topographical sketch of the theatre of war may serve to make more readily intelligible the occurrences and vicissitudes of the battle. Two streams, Lick and Owl Creeks, taking their rise very near each other, just westward of Monterey, in a ridge which parts the waters that fall into the Mississippi from those which are affluents of the Tennessee, flowing sinuously with a general direction, the latter to the northeast and the former south of east, finally empty into the Tennessee about four miles asunder. Between these water courses is embraced an arena of undulating table land, some five miles in depth from the river bank, from three to five miles broad, and about one hundred feet above the low-water level of the ri
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.54
of the Confederates filled every nook of the forest with the varied, commingled clamors of one of the bloodiest of modern battles. Earlier, General Gladden, at the head of his brigade, in the first line, had fallen mortally hurt. A merchant in New Orleans when the revolution began, full of martial instincts, as well as love of the section of his birth, A. H. Gladden was among the first to take up arms. With some soldierly experience as an officer of the gallant Palmetto Regiment of South Carolina in the war with Mexico, his military worth was soon apparent, and he had risen to the command of a brigade. This he disciplined in such a fashion as to show in what soldierly shape the splendid war personnel of his countrymen could be readily molded by men fit to lead them. Soon after Gladden was cut down in the rich promise of his career, his brigade faltered under a desolating fire. Its new commander, Colonel Daniel W. Adams, seizing a battle flag, placed himself in front of his s
Florence, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.54
that night, the fight would break out the next morning with renewed vigor, and all losses would be recovered. At the moment, however, this was regarded as idle talk, for an official telegraphic dispatch, addressed to General Johnston from near Florence, was forwarded to the field from Corinth, announcing that Buell was moving with his whole force upon Florence. Emanating from a reliable officer placed there in observation, whose scouts had doubtless mistaken the movement of Mitchell's DiviFlorence. Emanating from a reliable officer placed there in observation, whose scouts had doubtless mistaken the movement of Mitchell's Division for the whole of Buell's Army, it was credited, and Buell's timely junction with General Grant was accordingly deemed impossible. Therefore, the capture of the latter was regarded at Confederate headquarters as inevitable the next day, as soon as all the scattered Confederate reserves could be brought to bear for a concentrated effort. Meanwhile, night had shrouded the bloody field in darkness; a deep silence had settled upon the scene of so much carnage-a silence only broken through th
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.54
y or seventy acres, scattered occasionally here and there. Pittsburg landing, a warehouse and a house or two by the water's side, lay thrennon at Shiloh was his first tidings of a hostile junction at Pittsburg Landing; but even that was scarcely regarded as the announcement of as Divisions (Nelson's) lay at Savannah, and as he was leaving for Pittsburg, General Grant merely ordered that division to march thither by trouted them from their comfortable beds. When, too, he reached Pittsburg, it was to find his whole front line surprised, overwhelmed, routthe night at a point not more than four and a half miles from Pittsburg Landing. The other corps were now en route for Corinth, by a road wh force it back southeastwardly into the cul de sac made above Pittsburg Landing by the junction of Lick Creek with the Tennessee River. As t M. at a moment of sore distress. When General Buell reached Pittsburg Landing, not later than 3 o'clock, General Grant was at the landing,
Sand Creek, Larimer county (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.54
ter from a heavy rain, slept undisturbed and hopeful of the fullest fruition of a great victory on the morrow. On withdrawing from the ravine in which the nightfall had left him, Colonel Forrest, finding no superior at hand from whom to seek orders, with his habitual self-reliance looked at once for forage and food, and happily found both in a Federal camp nearby. Afterward he threw out a squadron as pickets, confronting as close as possible those of the enemy on a stretch of a mile to Coal Creek. He also dispatched Lieutenant Sheridan, of his regiment, with a squad of scouts in Federal overcoats, to reconnoiter within the precincts of the enemy's lines. Completely successful, in an hour Sheridan returned and reported that, reaching the landing, he had seen heavy reenforcements coming rapidly by water. Also, in his opinion, such was the disorder prevailing that if an attack were made in full force at once, they might be readily pushed into the river. Forrest, ever a man of
Purdy (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.54
r roads also approach from all directions, one crossing Owl Creek by a bridge, before its junction with Snake Creek, branches, the one way trending westward toward Purdy, the other northward toward Crump's landing, six miles below Pittsburg. Another road nearer the river bank, crossing Snake Creek by a bridge, also connects the twanies of cavalry, stood directly across the upper Pittsburg road, facing southward. One of the three brigades rested its right at the crossing of Owl Creek on the Purdy road, and the other two lay, the one with its right and the other with its left near a rustic log meeting house, called Shiloh. There, also, were established th, with the loss of five or six guns, was forced back just as McClernand came up. They were both then swept rearward, near the line of the crossroad from Hamburg to Purdy. There Sherman, with McClernand, gained a foothold, and, with several batteries favorably posted, made another stand on a thicklywooded ridge with a ravine in fro
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.54
etween the river and Lick Creek, or dispersed along under the river bank, between the two creeks, we repeat, had the Confederate corps been kept in continuously, closely pressed en masse upon their enemy after the front line had been broken and swept back. In that case the Federal fragments must have been kept in downward movment, like the loose stones in the bed of a mountain torrent. Fifth—In a remarkable letter from that distinguished soldier, General Sherman, which we find in the United States Service Magazine, he virtually asserts that, even had General Buell failed to reach the scene with his re-enforcements, nevertheless the state of the battle was such at 5 P. M. Sunday as justified General Grant in giving him orders at that hour to drop the defensive and assume the offensive at daylight on Monday morning. This to be the order of the day, irrespective of the advent of Buell. In other words, Grant had resolved to become on the morrow the assailant, forsooth, with Lew Walla
Hamburg, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.54
and did not fall short of a total of 7,000 infantry, with eighteen guns and 450 cavalry. A fourth brigade of the same division, by an anomalous arrangement, was posted on the extreme Federal left, at the crossing of the road from Pittsburg to Hamburg, and only about a mile from the former landing. The space thus left was filled by the division of Prentiss, of some eight or nine regiments, which we assume to have mustered as many as 6,000 bayonets, one-third of which, however, at the momen, was also advancing to support him. Such, however, was the vigor of the assault that Sherman, with the loss of five or six guns, was forced back just as McClernand came up. They were both then swept rearward, near the line of the crossroad from Hamburg to Purdy. There Sherman, with McClernand, gained a foothold, and, with several batteries favorably posted, made another stand on a thicklywooded ridge with a ravine in front. But, speedily assailed by Ruggles and some of Polk's Brigades, with
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.54
One of the three brigades rested its right at the crossing of Owl Creek on the Purdy road, and the other two lay, the one with its right and the other with its left near a rustic log meeting house, called Shiloh. There, also, were established the headquarters of Sherman. In front of this position were a ravine and rivulet, which gave some natural strength if merely held with soldiery circumspection. As these regiments had but lately come from the depots and cantonments of Ohio and Illinois, their ranks were doubtless full and did not fall short of a total of 7,000 infantry, with eighteen guns and 450 cavalry. A fourth brigade of the same division, by an anomalous arrangement, was posted on the extreme Federal left, at the crossing of the road from Pittsburg to Hamburg, and only about a mile from the former landing. The space thus left was filled by the division of Prentiss, of some eight or nine regiments, which we assume to have mustered as many as 6,000 bayonets, one-
Shiloh Church (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.54
of the Confederates that all that could be done was to glean food sufficient for their supper, for which, indeed, all were dependent upon what they could thus find. The prioners, however, were collected together during the night not far from Shiloh Church, where Generals Beauregard and Bragg established their headquarters. There, after a time, the former had an interview with his corps commanders, and received brief oral reports of the operations of the day. Among the prisoners was Generaln that quarter before the retreat began. The retreat had now commenced in earnest, but so stunned and crippled was the enemy that no effort or pretense to pursue was made. The line established to cover the movement commanded the ground of Shiloh Church, and some open fields in the neighborhood. Thence keeping up a vigorous play of artillery on the woods beyond, there was no reply, nor did any enemy become visible. That line was then withdrawn about three-fourths of a mile to another fav
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