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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
e to General James H. Wilson from Summerville, Ga.: I am going into the very bowels of the Confederacy, and propose to leave a trail that will be recognized fifty years hence. To Colonel A. Beckwith he wrote of same date: I propose to abandon Atlanta and the railroad back to Chattanooga, and sally forth to ruin Georgia, and bring up on the seashore. To General Grant he wrote on that date—I am perfecting arrangements to break up the railroad in front of Dalton, .including the city of AtlantaAtlanta, and push into Georgia, break up all its railroads and depots, capture its horses and negroes and make desolation everywhere. All these promises he literally fulfilled, as witness the pages. of history. But coming back to Memphis, we find General Sherman issuing the following special orders, No. 283, as shown in war record, No. 17, part 2, page 280: headquarters first Division, district of West Tennessee, Memphis, October 8, 1862. The 46th Ohio, Colonel Walcutt, will embark to-night
Horn Lake (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
ative just before daylight, but in a state of exhaustion and collapse. Before arriving at Memphis, the Federals released my father and Esquire Gillespie, and they returned home on foot. My father found his home in ashes, and my sister being cared for by the old family servants. They admonished my father and Esquire Gillespie to be very careful, and not let any more rebels shoot their men; if they did, no excuse would spare their lives. Notwithstanding their threats, my father called to his aid one of his old negro men and went in search of young White's body. They found him lying by a tree, where he had been horribly murdered. He had six bullet holes in his head, one in each eye, and six saber cuts on his body, besides wounds on his shoulders. Father and the old servant brought him home and kept him until his brother-in-law came out from Memphis under a flag of truce, when the three dug a grave and laid him to rest. Mary L. Hutchinson. Horn Lake, Miss., November 4, 1886.
Rome, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
Filipinos. It is not for the purpose of reopening old sores, now happily healed, but to show that General Jacob H. Smith is not the only modern Duke of Alva, that these facts are recited. General Smith had an illustrious example. General W. T. Sherman said: War is hell; and General Sherman knew, for he certainly endeavored to make it so. On October 29, 1864, General Sherman issued the following official order, viz.: headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, in the field, Rome, Ga., October 29, 1864. Brigadier-General Watkins, Caloun, Ga.,—Cannot you send over about Fairmount and Adairsville, burn ten or twelve houses of known secessionists, kill a few at random and let them know that it will be repeated every time a train is fired on from Resaca to Kingston? W. T. Sherman, Major-General Commanding. That order is printed in the war record, serial volumn No. 79, page 494, and each of the instances hereinafter mentioned are likewise not legends, but taken from
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
e very bowels of the Confederacy, and propose to leave a trail that will be recognized fifty years hence. To Colonel A. Beckwith he wrote of same date: I propose to abandon Atlanta and the railroad back to Chattanooga, and sally forth to ruin Georgia, and bring up on the seashore. To General Grant he wrote on that date—I am perfecting arrangements to break up the railroad in front of Dalton, .including the city of Atlanta, and push into Georgia, break up all its railroads and depots, capturGeorgia, break up all its railroads and depots, capture its horses and negroes and make desolation everywhere. All these promises he literally fulfilled, as witness the pages. of history. But coming back to Memphis, we find General Sherman issuing the following special orders, No. 283, as shown in war record, No. 17, part 2, page 280: headquarters first Division, district of West Tennessee, Memphis, October 8, 1862. The 46th Ohio, Colonel Walcutt, will embark to-night on board the steamboat, and before daylight drop down to a point on
Rienzi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
ce. Lieutenant Cunningham was immediately killed, but his death was avenged by a detachment sent out under Major Loomis by your order. War Record 17, part I, page 55. On August 8, 1862, General Granville M. Dodge writes from Trenton, Tenn.: I believe our policy is to burn up those counties (Dyer, Lauderdale and Hickman). They pay no attention to the oath and feed and guide the rebels. (War record No. 17, part 1, page 30.) On August 28, 1862, General Gordon Granger reports from Rienzi, Miss.: Two things are most necessary and important: First, there must be some definite and fixed policy on our part to combat and break up this infernal guerrilla system of theives. It is bound soon to waste an entire army away, and for no equivalent. We must push every man, woman and child before us, or put every man to death found in our lines. We have, in fact, soon to come to a war of subjugation, and the sooner the better. War Record No. 17, part 1, pages 40 and 41. The r
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
eans, La., Picayune, August 10, 1902. General Smith's Ferocious policy in the Philippines anticipated by Sherman in Tennessee and Mississippi— Cold—Blooded Murder near Memphis in 1862—Other Typical incidents. By Hon. J. P. Young, Judge of the Circuit Court, Memphis, Tenn. Judge Young served as a private soldier in the 7th Tennessee Cavalry, and shared the memorable campaigns of the great Forrest, although he was only nineteen years of age when the war closed.—Ed. Mr. Sibley, of Pennsylvania, in criticising General Jacob H. Smith, of the American Army in the Philippines, during a recent debate in Congress for cruelty to noncombatants, said: When I have read, as I have within the past forty-eight hours, that a general wearing the uniform of the United States Army, one who stands under the shadow of our flag, issues orders not to conciliate a province, but to leave it a howling wilderness, and to kill all above ten years of age, then it seems to me that humanity must have marc
Hernando (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
r father's house and fired it, she was permitted to bring out her trunk and a few articles, all of which were then burned in the yard by order of Major Reuben Loomis, of the 6th Illinois Cavalry, and, comparing with that fellow, General Jacob H. Smith is an angel of light. But retribution finally overtook him, he being slain by one of his captains. Here is the letter: my dear Mr. young,—In 1862, about the 1st of September, a company of cavalry, about fifteen men, were sent out to Hernando, Miss., where they found a young lady on the eve of leaving the place with a large Saratoga trunk, well packed with her own wearing apparel. The soldiers took possession of the trunk and arrested a citizen (I have forgotten his name), took also a wagon and team on the place, put the prisoners and trunk in it, and started towards Memphis. About 5 o'clock P. M., one mile from the state line, on the Widow White's plantation, and about 200 yards beyond her house, they were fired into by some o
Adairsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
H. Smith is not the only modern Duke of Alva, that these facts are recited. General Smith had an illustrious example. General W. T. Sherman said: War is hell; and General Sherman knew, for he certainly endeavored to make it so. On October 29, 1864, General Sherman issued the following official order, viz.: headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, in the field, Rome, Ga., October 29, 1864. Brigadier-General Watkins, Caloun, Ga.,—Cannot you send over about Fairmount and Adairsville, burn ten or twelve houses of known secessionists, kill a few at random and let them know that it will be repeated every time a train is fired on from Resaca to Kingston? W. T. Sherman, Major-General Commanding. That order is printed in the war record, serial volumn No. 79, page 494, and each of the instances hereinafter mentioned are likewise not legends, but taken from the same official publication. On October 19, 1864, he wrote to General James H. Wilson from Summerville, Ga.:
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
Federal Atrocities in the Civil war. From the New Orleans, La., Picayune, August 10, 1902. General Smith's Ferocious policy in the Philippines anticipated by Sherman in Tennessee and Mississippi— Cold—Blooded Murder near Memphis in 1862—Other Typical incidents. By Hon. J. P. Young, Judge of the Circuit Court, Memphis, Tenn. Judge Young served as a private soldier in the 7th Tennessee Cavalry, and shared the memorable campaigns of the great Forrest, although he was only nineteen years of age when the war closed.—Ed. Mr. Sibley, of Pennsylvania, in criticising General Jacob H. Smith, of the American Army in the Philippines, during a recent debate in Congress for cruelty to noncombatants, said: When I have read, as I have within the past forty-eight hours, that a general wearing the uniform of the United States Army, one who stands under the shadow of our flag, issues orders not to conciliate a province, but to leave it a howling wilderness, and to kill all above ten years
Hopefield, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
ng the following special orders, No. 283, as shown in war record, No. 17, part 2, page 280: headquarters first Division, district of West Tennessee, Memphis, October 8, 1862. The 46th Ohio, Colonel Walcutt, will embark to-night on board the steamboat, and before daylight drop down to a point on the Arkansas shore, about fifteen miles below this, near Elmgrove Postoffice, and there disembark. He will then proceed to destroy all the houses, farms and corn fields from that point up to Hopefield. This is done to let the guerrillas, who attacked the Catahoula, feel that certain destruction awaits the country for firing on steamboats. By order of Major-General Sherman. J. H. Hammond, Assistant Adjutant-General. But a darker chapter yet remains to record. On September 7, 1862, a detachment of the 6th Illinois Cavalry, under Major Reuben Loomis, appeared at a point on the Hernando Road, twelve miles below Memphis, where a skirmish had occurred the day before. Two aged men,
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