hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 120 4 Browse Search
United States (United States) 120 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 73 3 Browse Search
Robert Edward Lee 72 4 Browse Search
A. Lincoln 68 0 Browse Search
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) 68 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 68 0 Browse Search
William H. Payne 64 4 Browse Search
Alexander H. Chalmers 63 1 Browse Search
Jesse Forrest 62 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 54 total hits in 29 results.

1 2 3
Culpeper, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
stake if any State than Virginia is selected. Truth and justice are the underlying strength of continued successs. Stifle them, and sooner or later your cause will weaken. We should build this Battle Abbey upon a safe foundation, if we would preserve it as an object lesson to teach our children the principles for which these heroes, of whose lives and death this abbey is a memorial, would we make it; of imperishable interest and reverence for future generations? A Confederate matron. Culpeper, Va., July 3, 1896. My Dear Mrs. Green; Thanks for the copies of your appeal to the people in the matter of the Battle Abbey. For myself, I cannot see the reason why the Confederate executive mansion is not the most fitting place for the memorials of our struggle. It is quite large enough for the purpose, and if not, there is ample ground around the house for an annex. It seems to me but preposterous to think of Washington city as a site for such a museum. Your article is very well
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
e broad appeal of justice. All Confederates now living should have their say in this matter. The subject should be put before them intelligently. They came with their commands from North, South, East and West; many of them fell for this Lost Cause on Virginia battlefields, many dear ones now living, were nursed to health and returned home, they can testify whether Virginia bore her part heroically; they cay testify how she loved and suffered for this cause. The soldiers from Tennessee, Missouri, North Carolina, Maryland and all other States, who were gathered in Virginia—they can speak and tell how Virginia knew in this cause no locality, but only as Confederate soldiers, fighting in defense of a common cause, they were met and cared for. In Virginia they were fed and nursed; they can testify how her fields were green and forests full and how, after the war was over, she stood among the States naked, barren and scarred, deprived of her means, despoiled by the invader, for she was
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
nd reverence for future generations? A Confederate matron. Culpeper, Va., July 3, 1896. My Dear Mrs. Green; Thanks for the copies of your appeal to the people in the matter of the Battle Abbey. For myself, I cannot see the reason why the Confederate executive mansion is not the most fitting place for the memorials of our struggle. It is quite large enough for the purpose, and if not, there is ample ground around the house for an annex. It seems to me but preposterous to think of Washington city as a site for such a museum. Your article is very well considered and should have a good deal of weight, coming as it does from the daughter of a gallant soldier, whose name was the synonym of honor and patriotism. Believe me, very sincerely yours, V. Jefferson Davis. New York, Aug. 17, 1896. The Buckingham. My Dear Mrs. Green; Yours came safely and read with much interest. As I have written you already, I am with you in the Richmond view, and will help in any way I am ab
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
l of justice. All Confederates now living should have their say in this matter. The subject should be put before them intelligently. They came with their commands from North, South, East and West; many of them fell for this Lost Cause on Virginia battlefields, many dear ones now living, were nursed to health and returned home, they can testify whether Virginia bore her part heroically; they cay testify how she loved and suffered for this cause. The soldiers from Tennessee, Missouri, North Carolina, Maryland and all other States, who were gathered in Virginia—they can speak and tell how Virginia knew in this cause no locality, but only as Confederate soldiers, fighting in defense of a common cause, they were met and cared for. In Virginia they were fed and nursed; they can testify how her fields were green and forests full and how, after the war was over, she stood among the States naked, barren and scarred, deprived of her means, despoiled by the invader, for she was the great bat
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
ly—upon the broad appeal of justice. All Confederates now living should have their say in this matter. The subject should be put before them intelligently. They came with their commands from North, South, East and West; many of them fell for this Lost Cause on Virginia battlefields, many dear ones now living, were nursed to health and returned home, they can testify whether Virginia bore her part heroically; they cay testify how she loved and suffered for this cause. The soldiers from Tennessee, Missouri, North Carolina, Maryland and all other States, who were gathered in Virginia—they can speak and tell how Virginia knew in this cause no locality, but only as Confederate soldiers, fighting in defense of a common cause, they were met and cared for. In Virginia they were fed and nursed; they can testify how her fields were green and forests full and how, after the war was over, she stood among the States naked, barren and scarred, deprived of her means, despoiled by the invader, f
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
The Location of the battle Abbey decided. From the News leader, January 1, 1909. Mrs. Anne S. Green, of Culpeper, who has returned from Georgia, where she attended the United Daughters of the Confederacy convention, put before that body the following correspondence, showing how the movement to have the Confederate Battle Abbey placed in Virginia first took form, twelve years ago: Editor of the Times: The Battle Abbey of the Confederacy should be upon Virginia soil, not necessarily in Richmond, for want of space. God's acres of Confederate blood and bones, which lie under the soil along the Chickahominy, at Cold Harbor, Malvern Hill, and innumerable other points, all speak eloquently for Virginia to be chosen-this State, where the seven days fight in McClellan's On to Richmond occurred; where the flower of Southern chivalry made their pyres' of mortal remains, blood spilled then which has now become with the soil indigenous—the most fitting place to choose to make this B
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
eorgia, where she attended the United Daughters of the Confederacy convention, put before that body the following correspondence, showing how the movement to have the Confederate Battle Abbey placed in Virginia first took form, twelve years ago: Editor of the Times: The Battle Abbey of the Confederacy should be upon Virginia soil, not necessarily in Richmond, for want of space. God's acres of Confederate blood and bones, which lie under the soil along the Chickahominy, at Cold Harbor, Malvern Hill, and innumerable other points, all speak eloquently for Virginia to be chosen-this State, where the seven days fight in McClellan's On to Richmond occurred; where the flower of Southern chivalry made their pyres' of mortal remains, blood spilled then which has now become with the soil indigenous—the most fitting place to choose to make this Battle Abbey. No need to choose towns or cities, upon which to place this great corporation, which is to be the Mecca for future generations to rever
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
All Confederates now living should have their say in this matter. The subject should be put before them intelligently. They came with their commands from North, South, East and West; many of them fell for this Lost Cause on Virginia battlefields, many dear ones now living, were nursed to health and returned home, they can testify whether Virginia bore her part heroically; they cay testify how she loved and suffered for this cause. The soldiers from Tennessee, Missouri, North Carolina, Maryland and all other States, who were gathered in Virginia—they can speak and tell how Virginia knew in this cause no locality, but only as Confederate soldiers, fighting in defense of a common cause, they were met and cared for. In Virginia they were fed and nursed; they can testify how her fields were green and forests full and how, after the war was over, she stood among the States naked, barren and scarred, deprived of her means, despoiled by the invader, for she was the great battlefield for
J. Taylor Ellyson (search for this): chapter 1.18
g hollow of the city. All of these hills have a tendency to slide, and it would require the most careful engineering and expensive work to insure permanent foundations, even were the building located on the central school lot. Lieutenant-Governor J. Taylor Ellyson, president of the Confederate Memorial Association Trustees of the Battle Abbey fund, told of the formation and work of that association, and reported the fund for the erection of the building as now in hand. He reminded the campund, told of the formation and work of that association, and reported the fund for the erection of the building as now in hand. He reminded the camp that it was the women of the Confederate Memorial Literary Society who had pushed to conclusion the move to insure the erection of the Abbey by making a municipal appropriation of $50,000. Judge Geo. L. Christian and Lieutenant-Governor Ellyson, as members of the Battle Abbey Board of Trustees, were upon their request, excused from voting.—Ed
Anne S. Green (search for this): chapter 1.18
The Location of the battle Abbey decided. From the News leader, January 1, 1909. Mrs. Anne S. Green, of Culpeper, who has returned from Georgia, where she attended the United Daughters of the Confederacy convention, put before that body thrishable interest and reverence for future generations? A Confederate matron. Culpeper, Va., July 3, 1896. My Dear Mrs. Green; Thanks for the copies of your appeal to the people in the matter of the Battle Abbey. For myself, I cannot see the reiotism. Believe me, very sincerely yours, V. Jefferson Davis. New York, Aug. 17, 1896. The Buckingham. My Dear Mrs. Green; Yours came safely and read with much interest. As I have written you already, I am with you in the Richmond view, aproper site. I am unable to write more. Most kindly yours, Fred. W. M. Holliday. Winchester, July 27, 1896. Mrs. Green, whose effective agency in having the Battle Abbey placed in Virginia is justly established, in a communication publish
1 2 3