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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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West Point (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.21
all that can be done to drive the enemy back. At the same time I have not the force to risk a general engagement, but will resort to all other means in my power to harass, annoy and force the enemy back. It was well known to the federal authorities that the prairies of Mississippi and Alabama furnished bread to the Confederate armies. It is easy, therefore, to understand how anxious they were to lay waste that section, but having repeatedly failed to penetrate further south than West Point, Miss., by the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, it seemed to be the purpose now to send a force sufficiently strong to overcome all the Confederate forces in Mississippi, even if they should be concentrated against either of the three columns moving. General A. J. Smith, with three divisions of infantry and thirty-eight pieces of artillery, numbering all told little more than 20,000 men, besides a brigade of cavalry 3,700 strong, after repairing the old Mississipi Central Railroad from Grand Junc
De Soto (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.21
until 10 o'clock, Logwood retired along Front street to Beal, thence to De Sota. Captain Forrest, with that recklessness and indifference to opposition and danger which characterized him at all times, rode to Union, thence in the direction of De Soto. He was advised that the enemy was moving along Beal, Gayoso, Union and Monroe streets, but that made no difference to him and his heroic and of forty men. Leaving the hotel, he moved through Gayoso street to Main, and up Main to Union. Turninwn. Captain Forrest continued to shout, Put down your guns! The head of the federal column wheeled about, and coming in contact with those following, caused the greatest confusion. Forrest, taking advantage of the mixup, galloped out Union to De Soto and joined Logwood, who, in turn, joined Colonel Jessie Forrest, and returned through Mississippi avenue to the State Female College, where General Forrest awaited them. Colonel Jesse Forrest captured the members of General Washburne's staff,
Hickahala Creek (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.21
two days and nights. The streams were all bankfull, and it was necessary for him to go to Panola before he was able to cross the Tallahatchie, forty miles out of the direct course. Arriving at Panola, about 100 of his horses were so fagged that animals and riders were sent to Grenada. Forrest rested the command a few hours, and then set out for Senatobia, where he arrived about dark, and decided to rest the horses. Before leaving Senatobia he found it would be necessary to bridge Hickahala creek. Never at a loss for means to carry out his purpose, he sent the men to every ginhouse in the neighborhood to take up the flooring and carry it on their shoulders to the crossing, about four miles distant. The woods were full of grape vines, which were twisted together, making two cables as thick as a man's body. These were stretched across the creek and fastened to trees on both banks. Other details were cutting down telegraph poles which were tied together with grape vines also, an
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.21
in Anderson: Should General Washburne reject the proposal, then suggest that he send clothing for them. Forrest added that he would await the answer at Nonconnah creek, six miles south. General Washburne stated, in his answer, he had no authority to exchange prisoners, but would gladly accept the proffered privilege of sending a supply of clothing. In a short time Colonel Hepburn and Captain H. S. Lee arrived with a wagon load of clothing (Colonel Hepburn is now a member of Congress from Iowa), which was distributed under the direction of the federal officers. General Forrest then directed his surgeons to examine the prisoners, and such as were unfit to undergo hardship were sent back with Colonel Hepburn and the wagon, with the promise they would not bear arms against the Confederate cause until exchanged. The remainder, about four hundred, were mounted on the extra horses and the march taken up to Hernando. Including the prisoners, Forrest had about two thousand men witho
Nonconnah Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.21
aid-de-camp, Captain C. W. Anderson, back with a flag of truce, and with him he sent a member of General Washburne's staff, to say to General Washburne that the prisoners were in a wretched condition, without shoes or clothing, and as an act of humanity he would exchange them for such of his men as might be prisoners. He stated to Captain Anderson: Should General Washburne reject the proposal, then suggest that he send clothing for them. Forrest added that he would await the answer at Nonconnah creek, six miles south. General Washburne stated, in his answer, he had no authority to exchange prisoners, but would gladly accept the proffered privilege of sending a supply of clothing. In a short time Colonel Hepburn and Captain H. S. Lee arrived with a wagon load of clothing (Colonel Hepburn is now a member of Congress from Iowa), which was distributed under the direction of the federal officers. General Forrest then directed his surgeons to examine the prisoners, and such as were
Abbeville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.21
h Mississippi Cavalry, not over 300 strong, commanded by that brilliant young Colonel Alexander H. Chalmers, was holding the line of the Tallahatchie in front of Abbeville. His position was a very unfavorable one. The south bank of the river was much lower than the north bank, and furthermore the timber had been cut from the sout river and moved against the Mississippians, but were driven back. Colonel Chalmers held his position until late in the evening of August 9, and then retired to Abbeville, where he was re-enforced by General Chalmers with McCulloch's brigade. During the night General Smith crossed with a division of his army, and on the morningre we remained several days. On Monday, August 15, General Chalmers took about 200 men, including his escort, and moving around the enemy's flank, dashed into Abbeville, where two brigades of infantry were camped, throwing them into confusion. They fled precipitately, and were pursued until we saw a large force in line of battl
Ratliff (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.21
and in front of Chalmers, expecting evidently to overpower and capture him. Chalmers had but four guns, while the enemy used twenty. Like hungry wolves they charged the little game cock, but were twice repulsed. When Chalmers fell gack to Hurricane creek, six miles north of Oxford, the enemy did not advance further and made no attempt to pursue. Chalmers then fell back to Oxford, where he received advice from Forrest that he had left Pontotoc with Bell's Brigade and Morton's Battery and efore Forrest reached Oxford, at 1 o'clock. Chalmers returned with McCulloch's and Mabry's Brigade, the latter having joined him south of Oxford. The following morning Forest advanced with his entire force and drove the enemy back across Hurricane creek. Here the two forces faced each other for two days, during which time savage picket firings were going on. On the morning of the 13th the enemy attacked the left of the Confederate line, which was held by Mabry's Brigade and the Eighteenth
Decatur (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.21
d small arms provided and the morale of the men kept up to the highest point. Suffering from a slight but painful would in the foot, Forrest turned over the command to General Chalmers, and the latter wrote to the department commander on Aug. 1, as follows: Our scouts report that the enemy is making preparations to move from Memphis, Vicksburg and north Alabama at the same time, and, if successful, to concentrate at Selma. There are now 14,000 infantry at Lagrange, a brigade moving from Decatur and other troops arranging for departure from Memphis. Some troops, number unknown, have been sent down the river to Vicksburg. If the enemy moves in three columns, as expected, it will be impossible for us to meet him, and after consultation with Major General Forrest, we have concluded to recommend a consolidation of the troops in this department to meet one column. The northern column will be the largest. If we can defeat it, the others may be easily overtaken and crushed. Our effec
Yocona (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.21
front of the enemy. Late in the afternoon of August 19, General Chalmers moved his whole force forward, driving back the federal outposts, and made a sharp attack against the main line. His troops, wet and hungry, knowing the great disparity in numbers, they did not hesitate. General Smith was startled. He felt sure that Forrest had been re-enforced. On the 21st General Chalmers decided to draw the federal commander further away from his base. He fell back to the south bank of the Yocona river. The federal forces, therefore, marched into Oxford on the morning of the 22d, and, finding no Confederates at hand, scattered over the town, indulging in the most disgraceful acts of arson and rapine. The force was under the immediate command of Brigadier General Hatch, who gave order to burn all public buildings and all unoccupied houses. The splendid courthouse and other handsome buildings were destroyed, and of what was an attractive little city on the morning of August 22d, there
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.21
The Capture of Memphis by Gen. Nathan B. Forrest. From N. O., La., Picayune, December 15, 1901. Captain Dinkins recalls a thrilling incident of the Civil War—The great Confederate Cavalry leader Outgeneraled an Army larger than his own. A few days after the battle of Brice's Crossroads General Forrest addressed a communication to Major General Washburne at Memphis, in which he stated that it had been reported to him that the negro troops in Memphis took an oath on their knees in the presence of Major General Hurlbut and others to avenge Fort Pillow, and that they would show no quarter to the Confederates. He also advised that he had heard on indisputable authority that the troops under General Sturgis, on their march to Brice's Crossroads, publicly in many places, proclaimed that no quarter would be shown our men, and that when they moved into action, on June Io, their officers appealed to them to remember Fort Pillow. Forrest also informed General Washburne that the f
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