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Hazel Grove (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.22
e too long to rehearse the whole story of the Chancellorsville fight. It is sufficient to say that when the field becomes a part of the National Park and is dotted with monuments to mark the positions of the various forces it will be fully as interesting as Gettysburg. There still remain many of the earthworks thrown up by the armies, and the sites of graves are still visible in the woods. The party drove along a road which followed the trenches dug by men of the Twelfth Corps, over to Hazel Grove, which was a conspicuous point during the battle. It is not a settlement, as its name implies, but a solitary farm house on a hill, which was the position of a battery. The magnificent spring which was so useful to the army still remains, giving forth a splendid flow of delicious water. The story of Keenans death. It was very near this farm house that Keenan's Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry was stationed. The story of the charge of this regiment and Keenan's death is known to every
Wilderness Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.22
scharged, but as I stood in the door of my house, my old company came rushing right across my garden. This was too much for me, and, picking up a gun, I went off with them down the road, yelling with the rest of them. I heard all the officers as they talked during the day, and not one of them knew that they were going to be attacked. A night in the Wilderness. A few miles beyond Talley's house the party entered the Wilderness. Never did name seem more misfitted. The valley of Wilderness Run is beautiful. The fields stretch away to the forests on every side and are as green as a well-watered, fertile soil can make them,. Instead of wilderness the country seems a paradise. It was only when, a few miles farther on, after the Lacy house had been left in the distance and Palmer's field, which was once covered with dead bodies, had been passed, that the procession of carriages, turning into the woods, encountered a real wilderness. In the midst of an indescribable tangle of
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.22
On historic Spots. From the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 23, 1899. A visit to the Battlefield around Fredericksburg—Days of War vividly recalled. Marye's Heights—Salem Church, Chancellorsville—The Wilderness— recollections of Officers—The Monuments—Notes. A correspondent of the Washington Post, who recently accompanied an inspecting party on a visit to the battlefields around Fredericksburg, writes as follows: On the morning of December 13, 1862, the Union forces were encampJackson held their last consultation—the one at which Jackson suggested the movement by which he flanked and routed Howard's Eleventh Corps— is still standing at the junction of the Furnace and Plank roads, out in the country, on the way to Chancellorsville. The road down which Jackson rode toward his command winds in and out among the pines, and was examined with interest by the party. In the meantime, however, some earthworks had been passed. There was where Lee waited for Hooker,
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.22
On historic Spots. From the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 23, 1899. A visit to the Battlefield around Fredericksburg—Days of War vividly recalled. Marye's Heights—Salem Church, Chancellorsville—The Wilderness— recollections of Officers—The Monuments—Notes. A correspondent of the Washington Post, who recently accompanied an inspecting party on a visit to the battlefields around Fredericksburg, writes as follows: On the morning of December 13, 1862, the Union forces were encamped on the northern shore of the Rappahannock, where their batteries commanded the heights, and were also in possession of the town, which had been shelled. On the heights on the other side of the town were the Confederates, in a long line, which extended several miles from Hamilton's Crossing on the right to Beck's Island upon the left. Almost in the centre of the line was Marye's Heights, a hill about 200 feet high, with a fine mansion at the summit of its grassy slope, and with a stone
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.22
hmond, Va., Dispatch, July 23, 1899. A visit to the Battlefield around Fredericksburg—Days of War vividly recalled. Marye's Heights—Salem Church, Chancellorently accompanied an inspecting party on a visit to the battlefields around Fredericksburg, writes as follows: On the morning of December 13, 1862, the Union forcewere the Confederates, in a long line, which extended several miles from Hamilton's Crossing on the right to Beck's Island upon the left. Almost in the centre of thrses' heads being turned toward Salem church. At some little distance from Fredericksburg, Captain Rowe pointed out a frame, two-story house. My father, he said, plodies had been exhumed in order that they might be taken to the cemetery at Fredericksburg. On the Chancellor field. The large pine tree under which Lee and Jacnd so many corpses on his place that the keeper of the National Cemetery at Fredericksburg grew tired of coming after them. This, it is to be remembered, is thirty-f
Marye's Heights (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.22
On historic Spots. From the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 23, 1899. A visit to the Battlefield around Fredericksburg—Days of War vividly recalled. Marye's Heights—Salem Church, Chancellorsville—The Wilderness— recollections of Officers—The Monuments—Notes. A correspondent of the Washington Post, who recently accompanates, in a long line, which extended several miles from Hamilton's Crossing on the right to Beck's Island upon the left. Almost in the centre of the line was Marye's Heights, a hill about 200 feet high, with a fine mansion at the summit of its grassy slope, and with a stone wall and a sunken road at its foot. From the wall to thell, round hole of the minie-ball. The slaughter below the Heights. As the party stood upon the hill top, the story of the awful slaughter at the foot of Marye's Heights was retold. In the road below was the monument which marked the spot where General Cobb was killed, with the house still standing over which came the sh
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.22
th dead horses, and when bursting shells made dreadful music, was very vivid. At Salem church, an old-fashioned brick building, the party stood beside the old earthworks and listened to the story of Sedgwick's fight, with the maps spread under the shade of a large tree, upon some tables which had evidently been constructed for a picnic party. The walls of the church plainly showed the marks of bullets and cannon balls. Within the edifice is a memorial altar built by the contributions of New Jersey and South Carolina men, and a Grand Army post in the former State, composed of survivors of the fight, has supported the Salem church Sunday-School for thirty years. When Sheridan marched through to Washington in 1865, said Colonel Bird, he saw many bodies still unburied, and reported that fact. I came down here to bury them. As he spoke he also pointed out many places where bodies had been exhumed in order that they might be taken to the cemetery at Fredericksburg. On the Chancell
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.22
nd when bursting shells made dreadful music, was very vivid. At Salem church, an old-fashioned brick building, the party stood beside the old earthworks and listened to the story of Sedgwick's fight, with the maps spread under the shade of a large tree, upon some tables which had evidently been constructed for a picnic party. The walls of the church plainly showed the marks of bullets and cannon balls. Within the edifice is a memorial altar built by the contributions of New Jersey and South Carolina men, and a Grand Army post in the former State, composed of survivors of the fight, has supported the Salem church Sunday-School for thirty years. When Sheridan marched through to Washington in 1865, said Colonel Bird, he saw many bodies still unburied, and reported that fact. I came down here to bury them. As he spoke he also pointed out many places where bodies had been exhumed in order that they might be taken to the cemetery at Fredericksburg. On the Chancellor field. The
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.22
ent on the spot, and there it stands to this day, in all its solitude and simplicity, the mute reminder of a war-time episode. Artillery works preserved. It was one of the many curious coincidences of this battlefield region that the very road over which Jackson marched to flank Howard—known as the Brock road—was also the point which a year later Hancock told General Getty to hold at all hazards. It was then the line of communication for the Union army, when Grant was moving toward Spotsylvania. The point where the Orange turnpike crosses the Brock road was reached in a few minutes after passing the point where Wadsworth was killed. There was desperate fighting along here between Hancock and Longstreet. The Brock road is still lined with the defensive works built by the Union army, while the artillery works erected by Barlow, on Hancock's extreme left, were found in a wonderful state of preservation. They could even now be used at a moment's notice. They stand in a small fi
Todd's Tavern (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.22
to our guns. The trenches are in the deep woods and are covered with a carpet of pine needles. They are nearly all still waist-deep. The forest is very thick—very much as it must have been when the trenches were built, and when Hancock reported that his men could not see a hundred yards ahead. Where Sedgwick was killed. Still on and on. Slowly the carriages made their way along the Brock road, passing the narrow-gauge railroad, in the cuts of which Mahone formed his men, until Todd's Tavern was reached. It is no longer a tavern—not even the old house is standing. The present house is a plain, frame dwelling. Its occupants did not even live at the place during the war. The party was now well out of the Wilderness, and was entering the locality made famous by the battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. Passing the Alsop house, which is still standing, and which was a hospital during the war, the carriages soon halted in f
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