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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Capitol Hill (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
: At the last annual meeting of our Society a resolution was passed requesting me to prepare a paper to be read at this gathering on the Constitutional Convention of 1788, which assembled in the city of Richmond in June of that year. The Convention held its first sittings in what was known as the Old Capitol, a wooden building situated at the southwest corner of Cary and Fourteenth Streets. This building was erected in 1780 for the temporary use of the government until the building on Capitol Hill was completed. In 1855 the Old Capitol was torn down and the stores known as Pearl Block were erected by Hugh W. Fry on its site. The Convention later held its sessions in the New Academy on Shockoe Hill. This building stood on the square bounded by Broad and Marshall and Twelfth and Thirteenth Street, where Monumental Church now stands. The scope of your resolution, as I understand it, embraced brief mention of some of the distinguished members of the Convention, questions debated, i
Monmouth, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
tion of 1788, he was quite a young man, being only thirty-three, but destined to fill the office of Chief Justice of the United States. During the Revolutionary war he served as captain and distinguished himself at Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. His chief eminence, however, was in civic life and in the practice of his chosen profession, which he devoted himself to at the close of the war. His manners had been formed in camp and were in strange contrast to those of Randolph and Graysonlly an aide to General Lord Stirling. He was in active service nearly the whole war, and fought in the battles of Harlem Heights, White Plains, of Princeton and Trenton with Lafayette, in which last he was wounded; of Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. At the end of the war he was elected to the House of Delegates. At the age of twenty-four he was deputed to Congress and was the youngest member which the Assembly had ever elected to that body. He was tall and erect in person, his face, wit
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
ly double that of Pennsylvania. It was not far from three times that of New York. It was three-fourths of all the population of the Southern States. It exceeded by 60,000 that of North Carolina (including what was afterwards Tennessee), of South Carolina and of Georgia, and it was more than a fifth of the population of the whole Union. The great problem to be solved by the Convention of 1788 was, should we continue as thirteen Colonies or States, under a loose and undefined confederation, uns term, was a threat by the New England States to withdraw from the Union on account of the Embargo Act. This measure was repealed by Congress and the malcontents became reconciled. Again, in 1832, the Nullification Ordinance was passed by South Carolina, and disruption threatened. This critical trial was gotten over by the commendable firmness and decision of Andrew Jackson and the Tariff Compromise of 1833. The supreme test to which our government has been subjected was the war between th
Jefferson City (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
to the breeze. Emblazoned on its folds were the magic words of Pinckney: Millions for defense, not a cent for tribute. The people rallied to this inspiring cry. The effort of each side was to secure for their respective party the control of the Virginia Legislature to back up the Federal government or to cause it to recede from its position towards France. Each party recognized the potency of Henry's eloquence and his influence with the people and both made overtures for his favor. The Jefferson faction, in control of the Legislature, elected him, for the third time, Governor, which honor he declined. The other side bid for his influence by offering him the position of Minister to France. What determined the great commoner to change and become an advocate for measures he had so long and so strenuously resisted is a mystery. By some it has been ascribed to old age and disease. By others attributed to a desire on Henry's part to secure the good opinion and friendship of Washingt
Staunton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
ll, Dr. *** To 1 1/2 pounds Brown thread at 88 shillings per pound. Depreciation at at 600 per 1360 pounds Staunton, Va., 27th Sept., 1781. Received payment. (Signed) Wm. Hansill. The United States 1781. To Richard Mathews *** Oct. 17th.—To 1,000 wt. of Bar Iron at six-pence per pound, the depreciation at 600 per 115,000 pounds Staunton, Va., 17th Oct., 1781. Received payment. (Signed) Richard Mathews. The United States 1781. To Alx. St. Cl—To four Quires writing paper 2-6 per quire, 10 shillings. Depreciation 17th Nov., 1781, at 1,000 per 1500 pounds Staunton, Va., Nov. 30th. Recd. payment of Capt. Thos. Hamilton. (Signed) Alx. St. Clair. The United States 1781. Tonds 3 950 currency at 600 pounds per 16.11.8. By ditto pounds 2, 21, 13 at 1,000 per 12.16.4. ——— Pounds9.8.0. Staunton, Va., 30th November, 1781. Received payment of Capt. Thomas Hamilton the sum of six thousand, seven hundred and sixty-
France (France) (search for this): chapter 1.6
to pay—there existed no adequate power to enforce payment. Large sums were due France and Holland upon which even the interest had not been paid. The individual indsing upon the rights of the States, all of which grew out of the imbroglio with France that came near culminating in a war with the sister republic. Jefferson and his party were for yielding to the unjust demands of France; Washington and Lee were for sustaining the rights and dignity of our government, they unfurled their banneck up the Federal government or to cause it to recede from its position towards France. Each party recognized the potency of Henry's eloquence and his influence withhe other side bid for his influence by offering him the position of Minister to France. What determined the great commoner to change and become an advocate for measuished by the wisdom of man. De Tocqueville, the great political philosopher of France, declared the theory of government embodied in the instrument a great discovery
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
remacy of the Republican party, for the control of the State, led by Jefferson, Monroe and Madison, and opposed by Washington, Hamilton, Lee and other leaders of the swer it deliberately and with consumate tact, shorn of sophistry and rhetoric. Monroe's name is more conspicuously connected with, and his fame rests more prominentlrted in Elliott's Debates, while not oratorical, is candid, lucid and cogent. Monroe succeeded Mr. Madison as President of the United States in 1817, and was re-elected in 1820. Monroe's life teaches that Industry, To meditate, to plan, resolve, perform, Which, in itself, is good—as surely brings Reward of good no matter what Attic wit of George Mason; Madison with his incomparable powers of persuasion; Monroe with his sophistry and rhetoric. In regard to each of these great men it mightthern and Eastern States from meddling with our whole property of that kind. Monroe objected particularly to giving the Federal government unlimited power of taxat
Brandywine (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
three, but destined to fill the office of Chief Justice of the United States. During the Revolutionary war he served as captain and distinguished himself at Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. His chief eminence, however, was in civic life and in the practice of his chosen profession, which he devoted himself to at the closervice nearly the whole war, and fought in the battles of Harlem Heights, White Plains, of Princeton and Trenton with Lafayette, in which last he was wounded; of Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. At the end of the war he was elected to the House of Delegates. At the age of twenty-four he was deputed to Congress and was the you. He was a member of Washington's military family. With the affairs at Valley Forge his name is intimately connected. He was at the battle of Long Island, of Brandywine and Germantown and Montgomery, and is said to have commanded a Virginia regiment on that field. In early life he indulged in the popular sport of fox-hunting w
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 1.6
d by Spain into the halls of the Montezumas and they christianized and became a part of this ancient people. In English history the Wars of the Roses culminated in the union of the two factions, the blood shed knitting them together in allegiance to a sovereign in common. It was through blood that Cromwell ascended to the Lord Protectorship and through regicide that his power was secured. It was at Marston Moor, and at Nasby, at Drogheda and Dunbar that the blood of England, Ireland, and Scotland commingled, cementing the three people in the indissoluble bond that constitutes the Kingdom of Great Britain. The process of blood assimilation has produced the dominant race—the Anglo-Saxon. Just as the blood of the martyr is the seed of the Church, the blood of the patriot is the germ of nationality—it is for the healing of the nations. Are the thoughts I have uttered, the sentiments expressed, the suggestions offered, the facts advanced, the questions asked, the conclusions aimed a
St. Clair, Mich. (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.6
hard Mathews, Dr. *** Oct. 17th.—To 1,000 wt. of Bar Iron at six-pence per pound, the depreciation at 600 per 115,000 pounds Staunton, Va., 17th Oct., 1781. Received payment. (Signed) Richard Mathews. The United States 1781. To Alx. St. Clair, Dr. *** Sept. 20.—To four Quires writing paper 2-6 per quire, 10 shillings. Depreciation 17th Nov., 1781, at 1,000 per 1500 pounds Staunton, Va., Nov. 30th. Recd. payment of Capt. Thos. Hamilton. (Signed) Alx. St. Clair. The United States 1781. To Robt. Baggs, Dr. *** Sept. 9.—To my pay, as a wagon master, from July 24th last, to this day, inclusive, being 47 days at 48 shillings per day, pounds 9-8-0. Sept. 27.—By cash received pounds 3 950 currency at 600 pounds per 16.11.8. By ditto pounds 2, 21, 13 at 1,000 per 12.16.4. ——— Pounds9.8.0. Staunton, Va., 30th November, 1781. Received payment of Capt. Thomas Hamilton the sum of six thousand, seven hundred and sixty-pounds,
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