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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Myerstown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
laration were fully made known to him before swearing, and that I have no interest, direct or indirect, in the prosecution of this claim. Luther G. Witt, Notary Public. Minersville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., May 3rd, 1907. Capt. J. H. Bassler, Myerstown, Pa., Dear Sir and Comrade:—I hereby respectfully refer Capt. Gamble to my statement in your Reminiscences of the First Day's Fight at Gettysburg, a copy of which you told me you had sent to the Captain. I now reiterate under oath, that except, and our men bounding away for their regiment; but that the foe being then in possession of the ground around the McPherson buildings, they were all shot down. To my great regret, I neglected noting down the name of this comrade, as I was very weak then and my water soaked diary was not within my reach. J. H. Bassler, Late Captain Co. C., 149th Regiment Pa. Vol's. Sworn and subscribed before me this fourth day of June, A. D. , 1907. H. S. Gockley, Justice of the Peace, Myerstown, Pa.
Schuylkill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
oral Franklin W. Lehman, and made a dash for our regiment, I noticed before reaching the pike that the Bucktails had left, and that the ground was occupied by men in gray; that I then changed my course hoping to get around their flank, but was presently disabled by a gunshot wound in the right thigh, and that very soon after the colors were taken from me. H. H. Spayd, Late Color Bearer 149th Regt. Pa. Vol. Sworn and subscribed to before me a Justice of the Peace in and for said County of Schuylkill, this 6th day of May, A. D. , 1907. C. K. Taylor, J. P. My commission expires on the 1st Monday of May, 1912. To complete the above account I will quote from Comrade Spayd's statement as set forth in my pamphlet, in which he says, when he was startled to his feet by the rebel yell, the first thing he noticed was Corporal Franklin W. Lehman, bearer of the State flag, on his knees with his colors stretched across the rail pile and a rebel pulling at them on the other side. Frank he
Lebanon County (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
The Color Episode of the one hundred and Forty-Ninth regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. In the first days fight at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863. Paper read before the Lebanon county Historical Society, October 18, 1907, by J. H. Bassler, late Captain of the Color Company. The Reverend J. T. Lumpkin, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, enjoys the highest regard and confidence of our people generally. To know him is to love him. So gentle and unassuming is he, it seems difficultnd subjected to the lime light of facts, in order that the cloud, which, through the false claims of others, obscures the heroism displayed by the bearers and guards of those colors, may be finally dispelled, and the desperate fight of these Lebanon County boys to retrieve the errors of their superiors and save their colors from capture be spread upon the pages of history, and entrusted to the care of the Historical Society of their native County. Brehm, Friddell and Lehman were from Myerstown
Key Point (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
tery; Davis' brigade of three regiments (the fourth was absent at the time); all veteran troops and renowned fighters—and how many more of Heth's regiments south of the pike I cannot tell—opposing our brigade of three regiments, and these depleted by the absence of Company D of the 149th at Division headquarters, and Company K of the 150th in Washington, guarding the Presidential premises. Had the Rebs not been deceived as to our numbers, they would then in all probability have swept the Key Point, as Gen. Doubleday called our position; and how could our Corps commander have retrieved such a disaster, hard pressed as he was at all points. Was it chance, or destiny, that blinded Brehm and his men to the nearness of their capture at this important juncture? If the proximity of the enemy was unnoticed because they were then engaged in one of their hot discussions over their peculiar position, and what was best to do, it was a most fortunate co—incidence. If—as Stone quotes Nichol
Montgomery County (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
ed the Bucktails were on their retreat back towards Gettysburg and I followed, seeing it impossible to return to Brehm without falling in the hands of the enemy. I had failed in carrying-out my orders, but whenever the brigade made a fresh stand I remained with them and did the best I could in helping to check the enemy. (Signed) Fred. Hoffman, 149th Color Guard, Gettysburg. Sworn and subscribed before me this 11th day of May, 1907. John J. Martin, Notary Public, in and for Montgomery Co., Ohio. The above is an exact copy of the original except the spelling and punctuation. To aid the historian in sifting the facts regarding the colors of the 149th P. V., in the first day's fight at Gettysburg, from a mass of contradictions, I hereby testify that when lying in the southeast corner of the McPherson barnyard, the Confederates already being along the lane east of the barn, I saw Color-Bearer Brehm, with his flag, run obliquely through the meadow east of the lane; that
Aldie (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
le the artillery fire passed over our heads. Close on to I P. M. the scene changed. The enemy's re-enforcements were now arriving on the field. The first intimation we had of it was the fire of one of their batteries (Carter's) stationed on Oak hill, north of us. The crash of a shell through the tops of the old cherry trees along the lane admonished our Commander that we were exposed to an enfilade fire which might do us great damage. He at once swung our left out on the pike in line with the right, and ordered a left side-step movement to bring as much of the regiment as possible into the shelter of the dry ditch on the southern edge of the pike, in which we then lay down. We were now comparatively safe from the battery on Oak hill, but, unfortunately, the enemy to the west got a glimpse of our left before we lay down, and shrewdly guessing our position, at once commenced to drop shells into our ranks over the crest of the ridge. With those thirty-four guns on our flank the
Minersville (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
regiment; that I changed my course and got by the left flank of the enemy, but before getting far was disabled by a gun shot wound through my leg. (Signed) Franklin W. Lehman. Subscribed and sworn to before me this 4th day of March, A. D. , 1907; and I hereby certify that the contents of the above declaration were fully made known to him before swearing, and that I have no interest, direct or indirect, in the prosecution of this claim. Luther G. Witt, Notary Public. Minersville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., May 3rd, 1907. Capt. J. H. Bassler, Myerstown, Pa., Dear Sir and Comrade:—I hereby respectfully refer Capt. Gamble to my statement in your Reminiscences of the First Day's Fight at Gettysburg, a copy of which you told me you had sent to the Captain. I now reiterate under oath, that excepting the first advance of our regiment to the railroad cut, and later on the dash at us of a squad of Confederates out of the wheat field, after, as subsequent events proved, our regiment ha
before, in the field north of the pike. Though unable to shift my body I could turn my head, sufficiently, to get a view of part of the meadow east of the McPherson lane, but could not see our line. It was then—at 15 to 20 minutes after 3 P. M.—that the dash on our colors took place, and I will let the surviving actors in that drama tell the story in their own language, in the following affidavits, the originals of which were sent to Captain Ralph E. Gamble, U. S. A., stationed at San Juan, Porto Rico, who lost seven blood relatives out of my regiment in the first day's fight, and is engaged in the commendable work of writing its history in that eventful battle. To aid him in elucidating the facts of our Color episode, is one of the objects of this paper. Affidavits. To Whom it May Concern: I hereby certify under oath that in the first day's fight at Gettysburg, July 1st, 1863, I was bearer of the State flag; that while my regiment, the 149th P. V., was lying in line
t. Some may think that now was the time for Brehm to run. Not so in the judgment of men noted for their thorough study of the fight. There is ground for belief that it was of great service to our cause that Brehm stuck to his post. True, he might then have left with a good excuse and saved the flags; but the results attained by his remaining, far outweigh in importance the loss of the colors. This is what Stone believed after reading Daniel's report, and such was the view taken by Col. Batchelder, who stands pre-eminent as the historian of the battle. I was introduced to the Colonel while attending the G. A. R. encampment at Gettysburg, in 1881, my first revisit to the battlefield. He questioned me minutely about our color affair, and my queries in return elicited the fact that he had investigated it before to some purpose by consulting Confederate reports and interviewing prominent officers on that side; and he expressed high admiration of Brehm's conduct and firmness under
J. H. Bassler (search for this): chapter 1.25
fight at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863. Paper read before the Lebanon county Historical Society, October 18, 1907, by J. H. Bassler, late Captain of the Color Company. The Reverend J. T. Lumpkin, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, enjoys tthe prosecution of this claim. Luther G. Witt, Notary Public. Minersville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., May 3rd, 1907. Capt. J. H. Bassler, Myerstown, Pa., Dear Sir and Comrade:—I hereby respectfully refer Capt. Gamble to my statement in your Reminisaking for the regiment at the top of his speed. soldiers' home, N. D. V. S., Central branch, May 11th, 1907. To Capt. J. H. Bassler, Dear Comrade:—Below find my sworn statement to be sent by you to Capt. Gamble, to assist him in getting at thected noting down the name of this comrade, as I was very weak then and my water soaked diary was not within my reach. J. H. Bassler, Late Captain Co. C., 149th Regiment Pa. Vol's. Sworn and subscribed before me this fourth day of June, A. D. ,
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