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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
lefields of Spotsylvania county in the Civil War were unveiled to-day. Colonel E. C. Massey, representing Governor Swanson, delivered the address of welcome at the tablet unveiling. General Joseph Plume then transferred the memorial to the State of New Jersey, and Governor Fort, of that State, made a speech accepting and transferring it again to the Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteer Veterans' Association. An address on behalf of the latter body was delivered by Theodore F. Swayze, of Washington, D. C. Similar addresses of presentation and acceptance were made at the unveiling of the monument. Miss Lena Rowe and Miss Grace Jones, of this city, and Miss Jennie Cawley and Miss Miriam Gordon, of New Jersey, jointly drew the cords which disclosed the memorials to public view. One of the events which excited most interest was the return of the battle flag of the Fourteenth Georgia Regiment. Representative Parker and Colonel A. W. Whitehead made speeches. About 400 members of the Ne
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
. General Joseph Plume then transferred the memorial to the State of New Jersey, and Governor Fort, of that State, made a speech accepting a, of this city, and Miss Jennie Cawley and Miss Miriam Gordon, of New Jersey, jointly drew the cords which disclosed the memorials to public volonel A. W. Whitehead made speeches. About 400 members of the New Jersey Veterans' Association were in attendance. Lunch was served on thd the monument. General Joseph Plume presented the monument to New Jersey, and Governor Fort, of New Jersey, accepted it and transferred itNew Jersey, accepted it and transferred it to the Fifteenth Regiment Association. The acceptance speech was made by Theodore F. Swayze, after the singing of Columbia. The principal aFifteenth regiment, New Jersey Volunteers. Erected by the State of New Jersey to mark that portion of the Confederate line held by the Fou On the west side is the following: Erected by the State of New Jersey, under authority of an act of the Legislature of 1908, intro
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
Memorials to men who fell at Spotsylvania. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, May 13, 1909. Monuments are unveiled at Bloody Angle and Salem Church—Tributes paid by North and South to victims of famous battles. Fredericksburg, Va., May 13, 1909. A memorial tablet on the battlefield of Bloody Angle and a monument at Salem Church in memory of the New Jersey volunteers who fell on the battlefields of Spotsylvania county in the Civil War were unveiled to-day. Colonel E. C. Massey, representing Governor Swanson, delivered the address of welcome at the tablet unveiling. General Joseph Plume then transferred the memorial to the State of New Jersey, and Governor Fort, of that State, made a speech accepting and transferring it again to the Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteer Veterans' Association. An address on behalf of the latter body was delivered by Theodore F. Swayze, of Washington, D. C. Similar addresses of presentation and acceptance were made at the unveiling of th
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
orthern counties—Rundeston, Sussex, Somersex, Warren and Morris. They came from plow and workshop, from desk and pulpit, the flower of mankind, eager at their country's call. With banners flying they marched peacefully away from Flemington, N. J., most of them never to return, but all destined to engage in a conflict unparalleled in the annals of war. They fought from Fredericksburg to Appomattox: in more than twenty-four conflicts, such well known battles as Gettysburg, Wilderness, Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. It was on this battlefield—Spotsylvania—however, that they accomplished a crowning achievement by passing the enemy's line and holding a most strategical position. This enemy did not yield before it had exhausted half of the regiment. So desperate did both sides fight that their deeds of valor will be remembered as long as the war itself, and after this monument shall have crumbled into dust. The closing address was made by Col. A. W. Whitehead, of Newark, N. J.<
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
Memorials to men who fell at Spotsylvania. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, May 13, 1909. Monuments are unveiled at Bloody Angle and Salem Church—Tributes paid by North and South to victims of famous battles. Fredericksburg, Va., May 13, 1909. A memorial tablet on the battlefield of Bloody Angle and a monumenwar. They fought from Fredericksburg to Appomattox: in more than twenty-four conflicts, such well known battles as Gettysburg, Wilderness, Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. It was on this battlefield—Spotsylvania—however, that they accomplished a crowning achievement by passing the enemy's line and holding a most strategical poshe Union line, recapturing the position it had lost. For the length of time of the struggle and the number of men engaged the slaughter at the Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania surpassed anything on record. It was the culminating clash of contest by the bravest and most determined men on both sides. Bloody Angle tablet. The tab<
Spotsylvania county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
Memorials to men who fell at Spotsylvania. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, May 13, 1909. Monuments are unveiled at Bloody Angle and Salem Church—Tributes paid by North and South to victims of famous battles. Fredericksburg, Va., May 13, 1909. A memorial tablet on the battlefield of Bloody Angle and a monument at Salem Church in memory of the New Jersey volunteers who fell on the battlefields of Spotsylvania county in the Civil War were unveiled to-day. Colonel E. C. Massey, representing Governor Swanson, delivered the address of welcome at the tablet unveiling. General Joseph Plume then transferred the memorial to the State of New Jersey, and Governor Fort, of that State, made a speech accepting and transferring it again to the Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteer Veterans' Association. An address on behalf of the latter body was delivered by Theodore F. Swayze, of Washington, D. C. Similar addresses of presentation and acceptance were made at the unveiling of th
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
ring to the Fifteenth Regiment, Senator Freelinghuysen said: It was recruited from five of the northern counties—Rundeston, Sussex, Somersex, Warren and Morris. They came from plow and workshop, from desk and pulpit, the flower of mankind, eager at their country's call. With banners flying they marched peacefully away from Flemington, N. J., most of them never to return, but all destined to engage in a conflict unparalleled in the annals of war. They fought from Fredericksburg to Appomattox: in more than twenty-four conflicts, such well known battles as Gettysburg, Wilderness, Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. It was on this battlefield—Spotsylvania—however, that they accomplished a crowning achievement by passing the enemy's line and holding a most strategical position. This enemy did not yield before it had exhausted half of the regiment. So desperate did both sides fight that their deeds of valor will be remembered as long as the war itself, and after this monument sha<
Flemings (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
olumbia. The principal address of the occasion was made by State Senator Joseph S. Freelinghuysen, of Raritan, N. J., who received much applause. In referring to the Fifteenth Regiment, Senator Freelinghuysen said: It was recruited from five of the northern counties—Rundeston, Sussex, Somersex, Warren and Morris. They came from plow and workshop, from desk and pulpit, the flower of mankind, eager at their country's call. With banners flying they marched peacefully away from Flemington, N. J., most of them never to return, but all destined to engage in a conflict unparalleled in the annals of war. They fought from Fredericksburg to Appomattox: in more than twenty-four conflicts, such well known battles as Gettysburg, Wilderness, Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. It was on this battlefield—Spotsylvania—however, that they accomplished a crowning achievement by passing the enemy's line and holding a most strategical position. This enemy did not yield before it had exhausted<
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
s-dispatch, May 13, 1909. Monuments are unveiled at Bloody Angle and Salem Church—Tributes paid by North and South to victims of famous battles. Fredericksburg, Va., May 13, 1909. A memorial tablet on the battlefield of Bloody Angle and a monument at Salem Church in memory of the New Jersey volunteers who fell on theefully away from Flemington, N. J., most of them never to return, but all destined to engage in a conflict unparalleled in the annals of war. They fought from Fredericksburg to Appomattox: in more than twenty-four conflicts, such well known battles as Gettysburg, Wilderness, Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. It was on this battlon, of Brooklyn, also spoke. Then taps was sounded and benediction pronounced. The entire party, expressing its delight in Virginia hospitality, returned to Fredericksburg, and to-night left on a special train for Washington en route to Gettysburg to spend a day before returning home. This double unveiling took place on the a
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
n engaged, 423; loss, 116 killed, 159 wounded, 33 missing. On the opposite side is the following inscription: Commissioners appointed by Governor John Franklin Fort, viz., Hon. John F. Dryden, chairman; Sergeant William H. Wyckoff, treasurer; Private Stephen W. Gordon, secretary; Sergeant William H. Crawley, General Joseph W. Plume, Private Albert W. Whiteland, Private John S. Gibson and Private Henry W. Hoffman. At Salem Church. The monument at Salem Church is built of New Hampshire granite, and is said to have cost $20,000. The shaft bears the following inscription: Sixth Army Corps, 1861-1865. To commemorate the services of the Fifteenth Regiment, New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, commanded by Colonel William H. Penrose, U. S. A. Engaged two hours on this line of battle on the Federal side, May 3, 1863. Loss, 41 killed, 105 wounded, 4 missing. On the west side is the following: Erected by the State of New Jersey, under authority of an act of the L
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