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Newbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
son, Dr. To Rent of Lovell's Is., £ 10. To Money pd being for year 1697, £ 8. To Rent for the Island, £ 10. To money being rent for school land, £ 8. Total, £ 36. From the Emerson Genealogy we learn that Rev. John Emerson, of the class of 1675 (Harvard), was the son of Nathaniel 2 (Thomas 1) Emerson. He was born in Ipswich, 1654, and died in Salem February 24, 1712. His grave is in the Charter street burying ground. He served as a chaplain in the Indian Wars, and taught school at Newbury, Charlestown, and Salem. August 25, 1699, the selectmen of Salem called him from Charlestown, at a salary of £ 50, to teach Greek, Latin, writing, cyphering, and to perfect such in reading as can read a chapter competently well. The following regulations at Salem were, doubtless, not unlike those in other communities at that day. The school bell was to be rung at 7 a. m. and 5 p. m. from March 1 to November 1, and at 8 a. m. and 4 p. m. from November 1 to March 1. School was to begin and<
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
the family must have lived here after his services as schoolmaster had ended. Benjamin Thompson has been styled by some the first native American poet. His versification was considered smooth and correct. Perhaps his most famous work was ‘New England's Crisis,’ a long poem on King Philip's War. November 16, 1674. ‘Mr. Thompson, having resigned up his charge in this town as schoolmaster ye 7 instant, this day ye Selectmen, with the advice and consent of the Reverend Mr. Thomas Shepard annual meeting in March, it was voted, if there should be a county school settled by the General Court, that this Town would raise £ 40, in order to provide for it, if it be settled in this town. Apparently nothing ever came of this. Neal's ‘New England,’ page 613, asserts that there was hardly a child of nine or ten years old throughout the whole country at this time but could read and write and say his catechism. If this be true, from the account which we have attempted to present, it
Kings Chapel (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ing in 1687, young Miles continued to teach in Charlestown for a while, for it appears that the town was obliged to pay him his salary up to October of that year. About this time he became an Episcopalian, and we next find him connected with King's Chapel, Boston. In 1692 he visited England and brought away gifts for his chapel left by Queen Mary, then deceased, and also from King William. Some of these substantial evidences of royal favor are still treasured in Boston and elsewhere. In 1698 the wardens of King's Chapel, for the third time, apply to the Bishop of London for an assistant, and, in mentioning Mr. Miles, speak of him in most flattering terms as ‘well liked of all of us,’ and as ‘a good liver and a painful preacher.’ April 15, 1723, he laid the corner-stone ‘at ye new North Church.’ After a ministry of nearly forty years, he died March 4, 1728. The receipt by which Samuel Myles, of Boston, in Co. of Suffolk, etc., Clerk, for and in consideration of £ 28 curre
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
oyal favor are still treasured in Boston and elsewhere. In 1698 the wardens of King's Chapel, for the third time, apply to the Bishop of London for an assistant, and, in mentioning Mr. Miles, speak of him in most flattering terms as ‘well liked of all of us,’ and as ‘a good liver and a painful preacher.’ April 15, 1723, he laid the corner-stone ‘at ye new North Church.’ After a ministry of nearly forty years, he died March 4, 1728. The receipt by which Samuel Myles, of Boston, in Co. of Suffolk, etc., Clerk, for and in consideration of £ 28 current money pd by Nath'l Dows, of Charlestown, treasurer of said town, doth remise, release, and forever quit claim unto said Town, etc., etc., the amount of its indebtedness to him ‘from the beginning of the world unto the present time,’ is a curious specimen of legal writing of that day. It was signed 27 March, 1699, and witnessed by Jno. Cutler and Thomas Parks. We are not without evidence that the colonists of the stricter so
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
e class of 1675 (Harvard), was the son of Nathaniel 2 (Thomas 1) Emerson. He was born in Ipswich, 1654, and died in Salem February 24, 1712. His grave is in the Charter street burying ground. He served as a chaplain in the Indian Wars, and taught school at Newbury, Charlestown, and Salem. August 25, 1699, the selectmen of Salem called him from Charlestown, at a salary of £ 50, to teach Greek, Latin, writing, cyphering, and to perfect such in reading as can read a chapter competently wSalem called him from Charlestown, at a salary of £ 50, to teach Greek, Latin, writing, cyphering, and to perfect such in reading as can read a chapter competently well. The following regulations at Salem were, doubtless, not unlike those in other communities at that day. The school bell was to be rung at 7 a. m. and 5 p. m. from March 1 to November 1, and at 8 a. m. and 4 p. m. from November 1 to March 1. ScSalem were, doubtless, not unlike those in other communities at that day. The school bell was to be rung at 7 a. m. and 5 p. m. from March 1 to November 1, and at 8 a. m. and 4 p. m. from November 1 to March 1. School was to begin and end accordingly! Comment and comparisons with present-day methods are unnecessary. Mr. Emerson married, in 1699, Sarah, widow of John Carter, and daughter of Richard and Joanna Stowers, of Charlestown. A daughter, Sarah, b
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
master's poetry.’ After leaving Charlestown, we next find Mr. Thompson teaching in his native town, where he engaged March 3, 1678,9, at a salary of £ 30. The town is to give him a piece of land to put a house on, and every child is to carry to the schoolmaster one-half cord of wood, besides the quarter money every year. 1688, Mr. Benjamin Thompson, physician and schoolmaster, is mentioned on the Braintree records, and 1696 he is the town clerk of that place. He was keeping school in Roxbury from 1700 to 1704. Mr. Thompson was twice married, first, to Susanna Kirtland, of Lynn, secondly, to Prudence Payson. He died April 13, 1714, in his seventy-second year, leaving eight children and twenty-eight grandchildren. Of these, a daughter, Susanna, was born in Charlestown June 10, 1673. The birth of a daughter, Anna, February 21, 1676, is also assigned to Charlestown. If so, the family must have lived here after his services as schoolmaster had ended. Benjamin Thompson has bee
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
him 5 pounds per year for house rent, to be payd in Towne pay, which agreement is to continue for one year.’ December 6, 1686. ‘Mr. Samuel Phipps, as Town Treasurer, is empowered to lay out the 25 pounds money belonging to the Free School, Provided he take sufficient security therefor.’ From Sibley's ‘Harvard Graduates’ we learn that the Rev. Samuel Miles was the son of Rev. John Miles, a Baptist preacher, who, in 1663, formed a society in Rehoboth, the oldest Baptist church in Massachusetts. He died in 1683, while his son Samuel, according to his will, was a student at the college. After graduating in 1687, young Miles continued to teach in Charlestown for a while, for it appears that the town was obliged to pay him his salary up to October of that year. About this time he became an Episcopalian, and we next find him connected with King's Chapel, Boston. In 1692 he visited England and brought away gifts for his chapel left by Queen Mary, then deceased, and also from
Rehoboth (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
in corn at money price. Likewise to allow him 5 pounds per year for house rent, to be payd in Towne pay, which agreement is to continue for one year.’ December 6, 1686. ‘Mr. Samuel Phipps, as Town Treasurer, is empowered to lay out the 25 pounds money belonging to the Free School, Provided he take sufficient security therefor.’ From Sibley's ‘Harvard Graduates’ we learn that the Rev. Samuel Miles was the son of Rev. John Miles, a Baptist preacher, who, in 1663, formed a society in Rehoboth, the oldest Baptist church in Massachusetts. He died in 1683, while his son Samuel, according to his will, was a student at the college. After graduating in 1687, young Miles continued to teach in Charlestown for a while, for it appears that the town was obliged to pay him his salary up to October of that year. About this time he became an Episcopalian, and we next find him connected with King's Chapel, Boston. In 1692 he visited England and brought away gifts for his chapel left by
Middlesex County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
econd wife, Katherine, daughter of John Brackenbury. He always resided in Charlestown, and, to judge from the records, deserves to be ranked among her most famous citizens. It was here that he joined the church, March 9, 1684. He held all the offices in the gift of his fellow townsmen, serving as constable, town clerk or recorder, town treasurer, selectman, and representative to the General Court. This last distinction he enjoyed, in all, twelve years. He was Clerk of the Courts for Middlesex county from 1689 to 1722, and for a time was Register of Deeds for the same. He also served as captain of the militia. Mr. Phipps died August 7, 1725. His interest in the Charlestown school is evinced from various entries in the records, some of which we quote later on. Taking up, in chronological order, the various references to the school during the Phipps regime, we learn somewhat of the school fund and of the disciplining of the schoolboys. January 4, 1875. ‘Voted that Lotts forfe
Ipswich, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
eare thereafter.’ January 6, 1698-9. ‘Xtopher Goodwin, for work at schoolhouse (4-6) four and sixpence.’ January 23, 1698. Treasurer's account:— Mr. John Emerson, Dr. To Rent of Lovell's Is., £ 10. To Money pd being for year 1697, £ 8. To Rent for the Island, £ 10. To money being rent for school land, £ 8. Total, £ 36. From the Emerson Genealogy we learn that Rev. John Emerson, of the class of 1675 (Harvard), was the son of Nathaniel 2 (Thomas 1) Emerson. He was born in Ipswich, 1654, and died in Salem February 24, 1712. His grave is in the Charter street burying ground. He served as a chaplain in the Indian Wars, and taught school at Newbury, Charlestown, and Salem. August 25, 1699, the selectmen of Salem called him from Charlestown, at a salary of £ 50, to teach Greek, Latin, writing, cyphering, and to perfect such in reading as can read a chapter competently well. The following regulations at Salem were, doubtless, not unlike those in other communiti
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