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Chelsea (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ty, being at various times member of the board of assessors, committee on public library, trustee of the Somerville hospital, and member of the fire department. He was a member of the Legislature in 1873, 1881, and 1882, of the common council in 1875 and 1876, and alderman in 1883, holding membership in the park, highway, and other important committees of the city government. On October 26, 1853, Mr. Vinal was maried to Miss Augusta Smith Peirce, daughter of John and Sarah Peirce, of Chelsea, now Revere, and great-granddaughter of Captain John Parker, one of the heroes of the battle of Lexington, and grandfather of Rev. Theodore Parker. Two memorials of Captain Parker have been preserved in the Massachusetts state house, one, the first firearm captured in the Revolution, the other, the gun carried by Captain Parker at the battle of Lexington. On the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage, October 26, 1903, the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Vinal was celebrated at their home
Robert Vinal (search for this): chapter 12
Vinal, who was a member of the Somerville Historical Society, and one of the most prominent citizens of Somerville, was born here on September 23, 1826, in the house which formerly stood on or near the site of Hotel Warren. He was son of Deacon Robert Vinal, formerly of Scituate, and Lydia (Stone) Vinal. His father came to Somerville, then Charlestown, in 1824; he was one of a family of five sons and six daughters; he was educated in the old Milk Row primary school, then standing within the Vinal. His father came to Somerville, then Charlestown, in 1824; he was one of a family of five sons and six daughters; he was educated in the old Milk Row primary school, then standing within the limits of the present cemetery, in the old Medford-street school, and in the Hopkins Classical school of Cambridge, then one of the foremost preparatory schools for Harvard College. After leaving school, he was employed in his father's grain store in Boston until 1848, when he became associated with his brother, Robert A. Vinal, in the same business on Lewis' wharf, which partnership lasted for fifteen years, or until the retirement of his brother, he continuing in the grain trade until 1876
Mary Lowell Vinal (search for this): chapter 12
un carried by Captain Parker at the battle of Lexington. On the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage, October 26, 1903, the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Vinal was celebrated at their home on Aldersey street, upon which occasion they received the congratulations and good wishes of many hundred friends and guests. Mr. Vinal died on July 14, 1904, at the age of seventy-seven years. A widow and seven daughters survive him, viz.: Miss Anna Parker Vinal, a member of this society, Miss Mary Lowell Vinal, Miss Martha Adams Vinal, Miss Josephine Vinal, Mrs. Sarah A. (Vinal) Keene, Miss Leonora Vinal, and Miss Leslie T. Vinal. Mr. Vinal in religion was a Unitarian, and a member of the First Unitarian Society. In politics he was a Republican. He was a man of strong convictions and unimpeachable character; successful in his business career and as a public official. He loved his native town and city, and his memory was stored with reminiscences of its history. An interesting paper
Sarah Peirce (search for this): chapter 12
the town and city, being at various times member of the board of assessors, committee on public library, trustee of the Somerville hospital, and member of the fire department. He was a member of the Legislature in 1873, 1881, and 1882, of the common council in 1875 and 1876, and alderman in 1883, holding membership in the park, highway, and other important committees of the city government. On October 26, 1853, Mr. Vinal was maried to Miss Augusta Smith Peirce, daughter of John and Sarah Peirce, of Chelsea, now Revere, and great-granddaughter of Captain John Parker, one of the heroes of the battle of Lexington, and grandfather of Rev. Theodore Parker. Two memorials of Captain Parker have been preserved in the Massachusetts state house, one, the first firearm captured in the Revolution, the other, the gun carried by Captain Parker at the battle of Lexington. On the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage, October 26, 1903, the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Vinal was celebrated
Charles D. Elliot (search for this): chapter 12
Quincy Adams Vinal By Charles D. Elliot Quincy Adams Vinal, who was a member of the Somerville Historical Society, and one of the most prominent citizens of Somerville, was born here on September 23, 1826, in the house which formerly stood on or near the site of Hotel Warren. He was son of Deacon Robert Vinal, formerly of Scituate, and Lydia (Stone) Vinal. His father came to Somerville, then Charlestown, in 1824; he was one of a family of five sons and six daughters; he was educated in the old Milk Row primary school, then standing within the limits of the present cemetery, in the old Medford-street school, and in the Hopkins Classical school of Cambridge, then one of the foremost preparatory schools for Harvard College. After leaving school, he was employed in his father's grain store in Boston until 1848, when he became associated with his brother, Robert A. Vinal, in the same business on Lewis' wharf, which partnership lasted for fifteen years, or until the retirement of
Amos Warren (search for this): chapter 12
Quincy Adams Vinal By Charles D. Elliot Quincy Adams Vinal, who was a member of the Somerville Historical Society, and one of the most prominent citizens of Somerville, was born here on September 23, 1826, in the house which formerly stood on or near the site of Hotel Warren. He was son of Deacon Robert Vinal, formerly of Scituate, and Lydia (Stone) Vinal. His father came to Somerville, then Charlestown, in 1824; he was one of a family of five sons and six daughters; he was educated in the old Milk Row primary school, then standing within the limits of the present cemetery, in the old Medford-street school, and in the Hopkins Classical school of Cambridge, then one of the foremost preparatory schools for Harvard College. After leaving school, he was employed in his father's grain store in Boston until 1848, when he became associated with his brother, Robert A. Vinal, in the same business on Lewis' wharf, which partnership lasted for fifteen years, or until the retirement of
e fiftieth anniversary of their marriage, October 26, 1903, the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Vinal was celebrated at their home on Aldersey street, upon which occasion they received the congratulations and good wishes of many hundred friends and guests. Mr. Vinal died on July 14, 1904, at the age of seventy-seven years. A widow and seven daughters survive him, viz.: Miss Anna Parker Vinal, a member of this society, Miss Mary Lowell Vinal, Miss Martha Adams Vinal, Miss Josephine Vinal, Mrs. Sarah A. (Vinal) Keene, Miss Leonora Vinal, and Miss Leslie T. Vinal. Mr. Vinal in religion was a Unitarian, and a member of the First Unitarian Society. In politics he was a Republican. He was a man of strong convictions and unimpeachable character; successful in his business career and as a public official. He loved his native town and city, and his memory was stored with reminiscences of its history. An interesting paper by him recalling events of former times, and entitled Neighborhoo
Robert A. Vinal (search for this): chapter 12
his father's grain store in Boston until 1848, when he became associated with his brother, Robert A. Vinal, in the same business on Lewis' wharf, which partnership lasted for fifteen years, or until park, highway, and other important committees of the city government. On October 26, 1853, Mr. Vinal was maried to Miss Augusta Smith Peirce, daughter of John and Sarah Peirce, of Chelsea, now Reington. On the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage, October 26, 1903, the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Vinal was celebrated at their home on Aldersey street, upon which occasion they receivedMrs. Vinal was celebrated at their home on Aldersey street, upon which occasion they received the congratulations and good wishes of many hundred friends and guests. Mr. Vinal died on July 14, 1904, at the age of seventy-seven years. A widow and seven daughters survive him, viz.: Miss AnnaMr. Vinal died on July 14, 1904, at the age of seventy-seven years. A widow and seven daughters survive him, viz.: Miss Anna Parker Vinal, a member of this society, Miss Mary Lowell Vinal, Miss Martha Adams Vinal, Miss Josephine Vinal, Mrs. Sarah A. (Vinal) Keene, Miss Leonora Vinal, and Miss Leslie T. Vinal. Mr. Vinal
ry of their marriage, October 26, 1903, the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Vinal was celebrated at their home on Aldersey street, upon which occasion they received the congratulations and good wishes of many hundred friends and guests. Mr. Vinal died on July 14, 1904, at the age of seventy-seven years. A widow and seven daughters survive him, viz.: Miss Anna Parker Vinal, a member of this society, Miss Mary Lowell Vinal, Miss Martha Adams Vinal, Miss Josephine Vinal, Mrs. Sarah A. (Vinal) Keene, Miss Leonora Vinal, and Miss Leslie T. Vinal. Mr. Vinal in religion was a Unitarian, and a member of the First Unitarian Society. In politics he was a Republican. He was a man of strong convictions and unimpeachable character; successful in his business career and as a public official. He loved his native town and city, and his memory was stored with reminiscences of its history. An interesting paper by him recalling events of former times, and entitled Neighborhood Sketches, was rea
Anna Parker Vinal (search for this): chapter 12
rearm captured in the Revolution, the other, the gun carried by Captain Parker at the battle of Lexington. On the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage, October 26, 1903, the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Vinal was celebrated at their home on Aldersey street, upon which occasion they received the congratulations and good wishes of many hundred friends and guests. Mr. Vinal died on July 14, 1904, at the age of seventy-seven years. A widow and seven daughters survive him, viz.: Miss Anna Parker Vinal, a member of this society, Miss Mary Lowell Vinal, Miss Martha Adams Vinal, Miss Josephine Vinal, Mrs. Sarah A. (Vinal) Keene, Miss Leonora Vinal, and Miss Leslie T. Vinal. Mr. Vinal in religion was a Unitarian, and a member of the First Unitarian Society. In politics he was a Republican. He was a man of strong convictions and unimpeachable character; successful in his business career and as a public official. He loved his native town and city, and his memory was stored with re
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