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Ipswich, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
in 1682, but held the office for a short time only, as he died the next year. The stone which marks his burial place may be found in the old cemetery at Harvard Square. Daniel, the second son, was a Chirurgeon, and resided in Cambridge and Boston. David, the third, did not hold any important office, but apparently was well known in the precinct of The Farms, as his son Samuel sometimes signed his name, Samuel Stone, David's Son. There were two daughters, Elizabeth, who settled in Ipswich, and Sarah, who married Joseph Merriam and lived at Concord. John Cooper, the son of Gregory Stone's second wife, by her first husband, became a prominent citizen of Cambridge. He was selectman thirty-eight years, town clerk thirteen years, and deacon of the church twenty-three years. His sister, Lydia, married David Fiske, and resided part of the time on Linnaean Street, Cambridge, and afterwards at The Farms, where he was one of the most prominent men. He was a wheelwright, but much
Essex County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
Gregory Stone and some of his descendants By Sara A. Stone Gregory Stone, and Simon, his elder brother, came to this country with their families from England in 1635. Their English ancestry has been traced with probable accuracy back to one Symond Stone, who lived in Much Bromley, Essex County. His will was probated in 1510, and is now in possession of the British Museum. Simon and Gregory were greatgreat-grand-sons of this Symond, and the record of their baptisms has been found in the church register of Much Bromley, February 9, 1585-6, and April 19, 1592, respectively. The marriage of Simon to Joan Clark in 1616 is also there; but the marriage of Gregory to Margaret Garrad has been found in the parish register at Nayland, Suffolk County. There are also records of the birth of four children, and the burial of the mother and youngest within two days of each other. Gregory married for his second wife the widow Lydia Cooper, who already had two children by her former husban
Charles (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
and Cambridge cemeteries once belonged to him. According to tradition it was he who built the old-fashioned house of colonial style, that, with the extensive buildings connected with it, served six generations of his descendants for two hundred years, till it was destroyed by fire. In the beginning, Watertown included a tract which now is divided into Waltham, Weston, and the largest part of Lincoln, and that part of Cambridge lying east of Mt. Auburn Cemetery, between Fresh Pond and Charles River, though these tracts were probably not inhabited, and even Watertown proper being but sparsely sprinkled with houses. Charlestown had already been settled, and Cambridge, then called Newe Towne, seems to have been designed merely as a fortified place, very small in extent, and apparently without definite bounds. The dividing line between Charlestown and Cambridge was established in 1632-3, and was substantially the same as that which now divides Cambridge from Somerville. A grant by
Framingham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
community, which was called The Farms. Perhaps here might be interposed a brief record of the children of Gregory Stone, other than Samuel, in whom we are chiefly interested. John, the oldest, settled in that part of Sudbury which is now Framingham, but in the latter part of his life came back to Cambridge, occupying the homestead after the death of his father, in 1672, carrying out a wish expressed in the latter's will. He was deacon of the church at Sudbury, and was employed by the tow a knife, enabled them to eat their bread and milk, or bean porridge, out of rude bowls or troughs, cut with an axe from blocks of wood. The terror from Indians must have been even worse. It is related that, after a massacre by the Indians at Framingham, during King Philip's War, a little girl was taken away to Canada, but was afterward rescued and brought back. The tales she could picture to her daughter, who figures in this narrative later on, can best be left to the imagination. On the
Dedham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ss than £ 12 yearly of the town's money for this school. Compared with the present outlay in the same district, this seems a mere trifle, but perhaps this man, for his faithfulness to public duties, is deserving of an enduring monument, such as the naming of a school building for himself and his family, full as much as some of our more modern worthies who have been thus honored. The Kent family was long identified with the history of Charlestown. The grandfather of Samuel came here from Dedham in 1653, and left a good estate to his children. Ebenezer, a distant cousin of Samuel, was the ancestor of Hon. William H. Kent, one of the mayors of Charlestown. Joseph Kent died May 30, 1753, in his seventy-ninth year, and was the father of nine children. In his will there is mention of seventy-four acres at Winter Hill, bounded, east, by a rangeway; west, by Peter Tufts; etc. Besides several smaller parcels, he left to his son Samuel sixteen acres, bought of N. Hayward, near Winter Hil
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
te stones in ye Old Burying Ground, his is the eleventh, or the second from the further end; and that of his wife, who died three years later, has been placed beside it. This couple lived together sixty-four years. The schools of Charlestown beyond the Neck‚ÄĒRevolutionary period Frank Mortimer Hawes (Continued.) Our account of the school beyond Charlestown Neck has been brought down to 1754. The object of this paper will be to continue its history to 1793. After the bounds of Medford were definitely established, there were left three school districts, which we, not the records, have chosen to call the Milk Row, the Alewife Brook, and the Gardner Row. The first of these embraced nearly the whole of what is now Somerville; the second may be said to have extended from the Old Powder House well up into Arlington; the third lay wholly in that town and along by the Mystic ponds. As we have indicated, the town books afford very meagre information, and we are forced to conten
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
p Increase, also from London, and settled in Watertown, where he and his descendants for several ge was destroyed by fire. In the beginning, Watertown included a tract which now is divided into Wtracts were probably not inhabited, and even Watertown proper being but sparsely sprinkled with hou. It is presumed that he settled first in Watertown, as he had large grants of land there, whichis time, there was moving to and fro between Watertown and Newe Towne, and Gregory Stone was one ofater, there was a fence to be erected on the Watertown line, and he was one of a committee of sevenet high, with two gates, on the line between Watertown and Cambridge. There is reason to think thaarried on June 7, 1655, to Sarah Stearns, of Watertown, and located at The Farms. He was made freeen men dismissed from churches in Cambridge, Watertown, Woburn, and Concord to enter into the work.question of the bounds between Cambridge and Watertown seems not to have been settled, or, at least
Waltham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ntee of eight lots, and later was one of the largest land owners in the town. A considerable part of the land now occupied by Mt. Auburn and Cambridge cemeteries once belonged to him. According to tradition it was he who built the old-fashioned house of colonial style, that, with the extensive buildings connected with it, served six generations of his descendants for two hundred years, till it was destroyed by fire. In the beginning, Watertown included a tract which now is divided into Waltham, Weston, and the largest part of Lincoln, and that part of Cambridge lying east of Mt. Auburn Cemetery, between Fresh Pond and Charles River, though these tracts were probably not inhabited, and even Watertown proper being but sparsely sprinkled with houses. Charlestown had already been settled, and Cambridge, then called Newe Towne, seems to have been designed merely as a fortified place, very small in extent, and apparently without definite bounds. The dividing line between Charlestown
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
, abutting uppon the Heade of the8 mile line toward Concord. In this locality many had now settled, and his so and Sarah, who married Joseph Merriam and lived at Concord. John Cooper, the son of Gregory Stone's second wihe was one of a committee to run the bounds between Concord and Cambridge. In 1673 he was appointed constable, looke after the Common fencis for the farmes neere Concord. Upon complaint made by him and Joseph Merriam, pointed to devid the lands conteyned betwixt oburne Concord and our head line, and alsoe to leave Convenient hi from churches in Cambridge, Watertown, Woburn, and Concord to enter into the work. The names of a son of each Samuel Stone, East. He married Dorcas Jones, of Concord, June 12, 1679. He probably resided in what is now Lincoln, somewhat nearer the church at Concord than the one at Cambridge, for the births of all his children a. In 1698 his wife was admitted to the church from Concord, and from that time their interests seem to have be
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ousin of Samuel, was the ancestor of Hon. William H. Kent, one of the mayors of Charlestown. Joseph Kent died May 30, 1753, in his seventy-ninth year, and was the father of nine children. In his will there is mention of seventy-four acres at Winter Hill, bounded, east, by a rangeway; west, by Peter Tufts; etc. Besides several smaller parcels, he left to his son Samuel sixteen acres, bought of N. Hayward, near Winter Hill, and the use of twelve acres of wood. He bequeathed his negro Peggy to Winter Hill, and the use of twelve acres of wood. He bequeathed his negro Peggy to his daughter Mehitabel; Venus to his daughter Rebecca; Jenny to his son Benjamin; and Violet to his son Stephen. The will of his widow, probated 1762, mentions her negro girl Jane. Samuel, the fifth child, born July 18, 1714, lived and died probably on what is now Somerville avenue. The family homestead is still standing above the Middlesex Bleachery, near Kent street. Mr. Kent was a blacksmith, and, like his father, held various town offices, including that of selectman. Wyman's invaluabl
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