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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906. Search the whole document.

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Mystick River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
equence. Voted April 13 to report a statement of facts to the town respecting the territorial limits and number of children in District No. 3. This school went on very well under the care of Mr. Russell until the schoolhouse was destroyed by fire, and so there was no regular exhibition. This fire was the third of March. The district commences in Cambridge road, sweeps around the Cambridge line, runs across Milk row by Isaac Tufts' to Winter Hill, by the house of Joseph Adams, Esq., to Mystic river, and down to the cluster of houses near the entrance of 3 Pole lane, and over to the place of beginning. It contains sixty-one families, and 106 children from four to fourteen, about one-third of whom are below seven years. The remaining seventy-three would be at a fair calculation the highest number to be provided for. Of these, the largest number live on the Milk Row side. This is the first report signed by James K. Frothingham, secretary of the board. The following quotations seem w
Alewife Brook (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
rer, who gave bonds for $10,000. Milk Row School, it will be noticed, at this time was represented by Captain Joseph Miller. The number of children in town was 1,167, or 457 between the ages of four and seven, and 710 from seven to fourteen. It appears that no children beyond the Neck, under seven and over fourteen years of age, were allowed to attend the town school. In reply to the complaints which came, in consequence, from the outlying districts, the report says that School No. 4 (Alewife Brook) contains thirty-four children, from four to fourteen, and yet this district receives for that number as much money as is expended within the Neck for fifty-one scholars. This distinction in favor of the schools outside is, in the opinion of the trustees, an ample indemnification for all inconveniences arising from their local situation; besides, the money appropriated without the Neck is abundantly sufficient to defray the expenses of their schools through that part of the year when th
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
om four to seven were thus educated at the expense of the town. The report read May 1, 1815, says: The trustees for two years past have kept a summer school at Winter Hill and the inhabitants have asked for a schoolhouse. The trustees would recommend one if, at the present time, our fellow-citizens were not struggling with great n New York, for information. From the report, signed May 5, 1817, we learn that District No. 3 is still maintaining two summer schools, namely, at Milk Row and Winter Hill. In speaking of No. 1, R. Gordon's services are highly praised. 1817-1818. August 9, 1817, the trustees have looked up the Lancastrian system of educatioibition. This fire was the third of March. The district commences in Cambridge road, sweeps around the Cambridge line, runs across Milk row by Isaac Tufts' to Winter Hill, by the house of Joseph Adams, Esq., to Mystic river, and down to the cluster of houses near the entrance of 3 Pole lane, and over to the place of beginning. I
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
one year, the latter for six years. Seth Wyman, the last of the original board, retired in 1807, and was succeeded by Captain Daniel Reed, who for nine years represented the upper end of Charlestown. Hon. Timothy Walker, Timothy Thompson, Captain Thomas Harris, Deacon David Goodwin, and John Kettell are names that stand for representative Charlestown families, but perhaps the most suggestive name on the list is that of Rev. Jedediah Morse, D. D. (1761-1826). This gentleman, a native of Connecticut, a graduate of Yale, and the leading minister of Charlestown from 1789 to 1820, was at this time delighting the educational world with his Geography, one of the first American text-books to gain an extensive and lasting circulation. For more than fifty years it was used in all parts of the country, but the later editions bore little resemblance to the feeble little volume which first saw the light in Charlestown. It served, where schoolbooks were scarce, not only as a geography, but als
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
on and namesake the following May, 1797. Two others elected to the original body of trustees should have more than a passing mention,—Aaron Putnam, Esq., and Joseph Hurd. The former was the first treasurer of the organization, an important office when we consider that it was for a better management of the school funds that a charter was granted by legislative act. Dr. Putnam's name deserves to be mentioned in connection with Charlestown affairs, for it was he who in 1801, sold to the United States four acres of his own, and as agent secured sixty-five acres, exclusive of flats, for a navy yard. Joseph Hurd, if we mistake not, served as the first secretary of the trustees. He was the son of Benjamin Hurd, and, as we understand it, brother of Benjamin, Jr., who succeeded him on the board. It is a noticeable fact that Messrs. Devens, Bartlett, Putnam, Hurd, and Gorham, Jr., all retired from office at the same time, and few of their successors, to judge from their terms of servi
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ovement. If, as he says, twenty-one districts were established, and to each a schoolmistress was assigned for those from four to seven, then, as the whole number was 425; each teacher had about twenty pupils, and the cost for each child was a little more than $2. The address also informs us that two of the schoolhouses on the peninsula were of brick, two stories high. In eulogistic mood, Dr. Bartlett goes on to say: The free schools were the glory of our ancestors, they are the boast of New England, and the palladium of our future prosperity. We cannot refrain from congratulating our fellow-citizens on a situation of their public schools so auspicious to the best interests of the town, so gratifying to the dearest hopes of parents, and bearing such honorable testimony to the eminent ability and fidelity of the instructors. The records of the school board that have come down to us begin with May, 1814. According to their By-Laws, the trustees met for organization the first Tuesd
excepted), it cannot be denied that the rule is not only favorable, but generous, to the people without the Neck. The teachers of the town schools were Israel Alger, with Oliver Jaquith for an assistant, and for the others Messrs. Fuller and Stickney. There had been two public examinations of each during the year, and frequent informal visit had been made, as a board. As a necessary and valuable auxiliary in teaching geography, the trustees had furnished a pair of globes and a map for the0, and Mr. Jaquith took the charge until June 8, when David Dodge was installed. July 18 Mr. Alger suddenly resigned as principal of the grammar school, on account of ill health, and Abraham Andrews, A. B., was elected his successor August 9. Mr. Stickney, at the Neck, gave up his position January 15, and was later succeeded by John Bennett. Mr. Jaquith was retained this year as Mr. Andrews' assistant. He resigned June, 1814, and was succeeded by Robert Gordon. February 25 the trustees vis
James Green (search for this): chapter 12
Seth Wyman, Captain Harris, Matthew Bridge, Deacon Goodwin, John Stone, Peter Tufts, Jr., Joseph Phipps. 1806, Seth Wyman, Matthew Bridge, Peter Tufts, Jr., James Green, Elijah Mead, John Tufts, Samuel Thompson. 1807, James Green, Elijah Mead, Peter Tufts, Jr., Captain Daniel Reed, John Kettell, Daniel Parker, Samuel Kent. James Green, Elijah Mead, Peter Tufts, Jr., Captain Daniel Reed, John Kettell, Daniel Parker, Samuel Kent. 1808, the same, with the exception of James Green, who was succeeded by Timothy Thompson. 1809, the same. 1810, the same, with the exception of Timothy Thompson, who was succeeded by David Devens. 1811, Rev. William Collier, Jonas Tyler, William Austin, Joseph Phipps, Samuel Kent, Philemon R. Russell, Ebenezer Cutter. James Green, who was succeeded by Timothy Thompson. 1809, the same. 1810, the same, with the exception of Timothy Thompson, who was succeeded by David Devens. 1811, Rev. William Collier, Jonas Tyler, William Austin, Joseph Phipps, Samuel Kent, Philemon R. Russell, Ebenezer Cutter. 1812, Rev. William Collier, Dr. Abram R. Thompson, Captain Nehemiah Wyman, Captain Daniel Reed, David Stetson, Captain Joseph Miller, George Bartlett. 1813, 1814, 1815, the same. 1816, the same, with the exception of Captain Miller, who is succeeded by Isaac Tufts. Holding over for a number of years previous to the reorga
Oliver Jaquith (search for this): chapter 12
favorable, but generous, to the people without the Neck. The teachers of the town schools were Israel Alger, with Oliver Jaquith for an assistant, and for the others Messrs. Fuller and Stickney. There had been two public examinations of each durt year. From the report read May 2, 1814:— The writing school, kept by D. Fuller, was vacated by him May 20, and Mr. Jaquith took the charge until June 8, when David Dodge was installed. July 18 Mr. Alger suddenly resigned as principal of thecessor August 9. Mr. Stickney, at the Neck, gave up his position January 15, and was later succeeded by John Bennett. Mr. Jaquith was retained this year as Mr. Andrews' assistant. He resigned June, 1814, and was succeeded by Robert Gordon. Febrat the Neck, with ninety pupils, under Mr. Bennett, and April 26 and 29 the two schools at No. 1, under Messrs. Andrews, Jaquith, and Dodge. They were perfectly satisfied with the good order and improvement of all. The schools without the Neck are
Ebenezer Cutter (search for this): chapter 12
Jr., James Green, Elijah Mead, John Tufts, Samuel Thompson. 1807, James Green, Elijah Mead, Peter Tufts, Jr., Captain Daniel Reed, John Kettell, Daniel Parker, Samuel Kent. 1808, the same, with the exception of James Green, who was succeeded by Timothy Thompson. 1809, the same. 1810, the same, with the exception of Timothy Thompson, who was succeeded by David Devens. 1811, Rev. William Collier, Jonas Tyler, William Austin, Joseph Phipps, Samuel Kent, Philemon R. Russell, Ebenezer Cutter. 1812, Rev. William Collier, Dr. Abram R. Thompson, Captain Nehemiah Wyman, Captain Daniel Reed, David Stetson, Captain Joseph Miller, George Bartlett. 1813, 1814, 1815, the same. 1816, the same, with the exception of Captain Miller, who is succeeded by Isaac Tufts. Holding over for a number of years previous to the reorganization of 1793 is the name of Nathaniel Hawkins. Wyman, who gives him the title of colonel, says that Mr. Hawkins came to Charlestown from South Kingsto
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