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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906. Search the whole document.

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John Bromfield (search for this): chapter 8
f three, James Russell, Samuel Dexter, and Isaac Mallett, was given full power to make transfer of the town's farm at Stoneham, so that the fee may rest in the school forever, as they may see fit. April 4, 1791, Voted to appoint a committee of seven to consider what further provision is best to be made for the public school and report at the May meeting. The gentlemen appointed were Richard Devens, Esq., Samuel Dexter, Esq., Captain Thomas Harris, John Larkin, Timothy Thompson, Jr., John Bromfield, and Philemon Russell. They beg leave to report it is their opinion that females be admitted into the public school within the Neck for six months of the year, from May to October, inclusive; that their hours of instruction be from 11 to 1 and 4 to 6, from the age of seven or more. That until nine years they be taught reading and spelling. That after that age they be also taught writing and arithmetic, and that reading from that time be considered as including propriety as to cadence,
nd handed to the citizens by the constables for the May meeting all annual statement of their funds, and a correct amount of moneys expended, in future. This was not an innovation, for there are in existence printed reports signed May, 1801, and May, 1802. The next that has come down to us is for 1813. From the Report of 1801:— Mr. Payson had unexpectedly resigned, and a Mr. Tillotson was engaged on trial. Unfortunately he fell ill, and the school was supplied by Messrs. Sewall and Rockwood, and afterwards for about the same time, six or seven weeks, by James Pike. Finally Mr. Ashur Adams was engaged. Mr. Blood was in charge of the reading school for young misses, and also gave instruction in English grammar, geography, and the Latin and Greek languages. The trustees flatter themselves that these gentlemen will give reasonable satisfaction to the town. Amount of money received, including $1,000 towards building the new schoolhouse and town hall, $4,124.81. Paid out, $3,--0
Josiah Bartlett, Aaron Putnam, Joseph Hurd, Nathaniel Hawkins, and Seth Wyman constituted the first board of trustees of the Charlestown free schools. April 18, 1793. The town treasurer was empowered to deliver to Aaron Putnam, Esq., treasurer for the trustees, all the moneys, bonds, notes of hand, etc., being the property of the free schools of Charlestown, that now are or may come into his. the treasurer's, hands. From this time all proceedings of the Charlestown School Board, up to 1814, were recorded by the secretary in a book, known as Volume I. Unfortunately, this valuable record is supposed to be lost, certainly it cannot now be consulted. The selectmen's books furnish us with the annual amounts appropriated for schools, the names of the trustees as they were elected, and a few other items. Voted May 6, 1793, to raise £ 175 for the schools, in addition to the school funds. May 12, 1794. The proceedings of the trustees of the schools, with a state of their funds,
dig a well at east end of the brick schoolhouse, to contain two pumps. There were two other wells in town (for fire purposes) at this time. July 3, 1812. Voted that the trustees have printed and handed to the citizens by the constables for the May meeting all annual statement of their funds, and a correct amount of moneys expended, in future. This was not an innovation, for there are in existence printed reports signed May, 1801, and May, 1802. The next that has come down to us is for 1813. From the Report of 1801:— Mr. Payson had unexpectedly resigned, and a Mr. Tillotson was engaged on trial. Unfortunately he fell ill, and the school was supplied by Messrs. Sewall and Rockwood, and afterwards for about the same time, six or seven weeks, by James Pike. Finally Mr. Ashur Adams was engaged. Mr. Blood was in charge of the reading school for young misses, and also gave instruction in English grammar, geography, and the Latin and Greek languages. The trustees flatter them
August 6th (search for this): chapter 8
od fathers of the town were to learn that appropriations for schoolhouses never come out with a surplus. We hear no more of this project until the meeting of May 14, 1798, three years later, when it is voted that the trustees exhibit their account for building the schoolhouse in Milk Row to the selectmen, and if they think it right, that they direct the treasurer to pay them what they have expended more than the original grant for that purpose, and direct the assessors to tax the same. August 6, ‘98, voted to approve of Mr. Samuel Tufts' bill for building the schoolhouse in Milk Row, and that the assessors be directed to tax the balance, being $241.49, agreeably to a vote of the town in May last. This would make the whole cost of this school not far from $750, or half as much again as the original estimate. May 1, 1797. After the proceedings of the trustees and their accounts were read and approved by the citizens at town meeting assembled, it was voted to raise $1,166 for th
December 7th, 1792 AD (search for this): chapter 8
ontinued his work in Boston until 1782. The Memorial History of Boston says: Samuel Holbrook, the schoolmaster, was Town Clerk of Charlestown, 1783. There must be some mistake in the date of his death, July 24, 1784, as the Charlestown records speak of him as late as March 5, 1787, when he was still living. His successor, Samuel Payson, was at the head of the town school in 1788. June 1 and November 12 of that year he received his quarter's salary, in the last instance £ 27 15s Od. December 7, 1792, The committee appointed upon memorial of Mr. Payson, the schoolmaster, have attended and find Mr. Payson has lost £ 50 in consequence of being obliged to sell his warrants for less than their nominal value in order to subsist himself and family. They report it is just and proper that the town make good the deficiency. Mr. Payson probably continued to serve as town clerk until his resignation from the school, some time in 1800. Samuel Payson, perhaps a graduate of Harvard College, cl
March 5th, 1787 AD (search for this): chapter 8
an unreasonable correction, but apparently no action was taken. In 1776 Mr. Holbrook received an extra £ 80 on account of the high cost of living, and in 1777 he was allowed £ 100 for the same reason. He seems to have continued his work in Boston until 1782. The Memorial History of Boston says: Samuel Holbrook, the schoolmaster, was Town Clerk of Charlestown, 1783. There must be some mistake in the date of his death, July 24, 1784, as the Charlestown records speak of him as late as March 5, 1787, when he was still living. His successor, Samuel Payson, was at the head of the town school in 1788. June 1 and November 12 of that year he received his quarter's salary, in the last instance £ 27 15s Od. December 7, 1792, The committee appointed upon memorial of Mr. Payson, the schoolmaster, have attended and find Mr. Payson has lost £ 50 in consequence of being obliged to sell his warrants for less than their nominal value in order to subsist himself and family. They report it is jus
ools in 1802. During a part of this period George Bartlett appears to have been master of the writing school. Voted, December 6, 1790, that George Bartlett have an order on the treasurer for his bill for ink for the school, 12s 11d. Mr. Bartlett was born October 5, 1760, and was a brother of Hon. Josiah Bartlett, already mentioned. He married Mary Gorham, and one of their family of eight children, Catharine, became the wife of Rev. James Walker, president of Harvard College (Wyman). From 1812 to 1816, inclusive, Mr. Bartlett served on the board of trustees. December 3, 1792, voted that Mary Rand have an order on the treasurer for her bill for schooling poor children, £ 1 5s Od. This item preserves the name of one of the female teachers of that period. We are now arrived at a time when Charlestown school affairs are to take on a more modern aspect. In accounting for the change, which was a gradual one, we can do no better than to glean from the records. The immediate cause,
1802. During a part of this period George Bartlett appears to have been master of the writing school. Voted, December 6, 1790, that George Bartlett have an order on the treasurer for his bill for ink for the school, 12s 11d. Mr. Bartlett was born October 5, 1760, and was a brother of Hon. Josiah Bartlett, already mentioned. He married Mary Gorham, and one of their family of eight children, Catharine, became the wife of Rev. James Walker, president of Harvard College (Wyman). From 1812 to 1816, inclusive, Mr. Bartlett served on the board of trustees. December 3, 1792, voted that Mary Rand have an order on the treasurer for her bill for schooling poor children, £ 1 5s Od. This item preserves the name of one of the female teachers of that period. We are now arrived at a time when Charlestown school affairs are to take on a more modern aspect. In accounting for the change, which was a gradual one, we can do no better than to glean from the records. The immediate cause, it woul
May 1st, 1797 AD (search for this): chapter 8
t, that they direct the treasurer to pay them what they have expended more than the original grant for that purpose, and direct the assessors to tax the same. August 6, ‘98, voted to approve of Mr. Samuel Tufts' bill for building the schoolhouse in Milk Row, and that the assessors be directed to tax the balance, being $241.49, agreeably to a vote of the town in May last. This would make the whole cost of this school not far from $750, or half as much again as the original estimate. May 1, 1797. After the proceedings of the trustees and their accounts were read and approved by the citizens at town meeting assembled, it was voted to raise $1,166 for the schools. Thus the old order of things was passing, and we are to hear of pounds, shillings, and pence no more. This was the annual appropriation (or more exactly, $1,166.66) until 1801. The amount gradually increased until May, 1806, when it reached the sum of $3,000. It fell off again in 1808 to $2. 000, but by May 14, 1812,
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