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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
n Ann Warren began the summer term at Winter Hill June 4; the next week Miss Gardner at No. 5, and Miss Ann Brown at No. 4 opened their schools. The last mentioned, being transferred to one of the primary schools on the peninsula, was succeeded by Miss Elizabeth Gerrish, July 3. About this time Mr. Kelley resigned, and Chester Adams was assigned to his place on committees. At the same meeting it was voted to authorize the treasurer to purchase three maps of the world and three of the United States for the three grammar schools. The outside schools had their usual fall examinations in October. Dr. Hurd was authorized to secure teachers for the winter school in wards 4 and 5. Ira Stickney was engaged for the Milk Row school, and Joel Pierce for the Winter Hill road. The former was relieved February 5, 1828, on account of ill-health, and the latter probably did not serve that season, as the teachers, according to pay-roll, were Philemon R. Russell, Jr., $124, Bowen A. Tufts, $98,
Chelmsford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
s examined. Number enrolled, thirty-five boys and twenty-three girls; present, seventeen and eighteen respectively. There were present of the trustees Messrs. Adams, Jackson, Cutter, and Pool. Remarks were made by several of these gentlemen, and the exercises were closed by an address to the Throne of Grace by Rev. Mr. Jackson. Mr. Joshua O. Colburn was employed to teach the winter school at ward 3 five months, to begin the first Tuesday in November, at $30 per month; Mr. John Parker, of Chelmsford, was engaged for the ward 6 school, at $32, from November 15; Philemon R. Russell, Jr., received the appointment to ward 4, at $27; and Bowan A. Tufts for ward 5, at $26, both to begin November 1 and to continue through the season. The number of pupils without the Neck in October was 199; in the whole town, 1,144. Of bills approved at this time, Charlotte Wayne; received $84; Eliza Wayne, $88; Cornelius Walker, $200; Sarah Perry, $63; Jane Hobbs, $16; Eliza Ann Cutter, $60; Samuel Bigel
Winter Hill (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Jackson of the trustees have charge of the Milk Row and Winter Hill schools; that Miss Charlotte Wayne be employed at the fo, was found in rather a languishing condition. No. 6 at Winter hill, under Miss Whipple, was found in a state of improvementthat Miss Whipple be permitted to continue the school at Winter Hill two weeks longer. Voted that the winter schools outsiowered to procure wood for the school at the Neck and at Winter Hill, and that Mr. Kelley perform a like duty for the other o 4, thirty-eight for ward 5, and sixty-seven for ward 6 (Winter Hill). The teachers of these schools received for services asis the opinion of your committee that the schoolhouse at Winter Hill may be made convenient and comfortable by merely placing houses. Miss Susan Ann Warren began the summer term at Winter Hill June 4; the next week Miss Gardner at No. 5, and Miss Aengaged for the Milk Row school, and Joel Pierce for the Winter Hill road. The former was relieved February 5, 1828, on acco
Mount Benedict (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ce on Monday next. Application for admission to this school may be made to Benjamin Swift, Chester Adams, Henry Jaques, committee. Charlestown, November 15, 1827. June 7, 1828, the private school kept by Nathaniel Magoun opens. Under date of August 9, 1828, appears the notice of a select school to be kept by Moses A. Curtis. Latin and Greek will be taught. But most interesting of these advertisements is the following, under date of February 9, 1828:— The Ursuline Community, Mt. Benedict, Charlestown, Admits-ladies from six to fourteen years of age. The garden has two acres, the whole farm twelve acres. Each pupil is to bring with her her bed and bedding, six towels, six napkins, and her table furniture, consisting of table and tea spoon, knife, fork, and tumbler, all which will be returned at her departure. The uniform of the young ladies consists, on week days of a gray Bombazette dress, and white on Sundays. Three months notice of a removal is requested. No boarde
Nathaniel H. Henchman (search for this): chapter 3
for the coming year is $6,000. Signed by Chester Adams, for the Secretary. 1826-27. Voted that Mr. Hall J. Kelley have charge of wards 3 and 6, and Mr. Nathaniel H. Henchman of wards 4 and 5. These gentlemen were requested to draft a set of rules and regulations for the schools outside the Neck, and to report the same to the board. Later, on the death of Mr. Henchman, whose appearance and deportment gave promise of a valuable and efficient service, William S. Phipps, of the trustees, was assigned to Mr. Henchman's place on committees. Mr. Benjamin Whipple was made secretary of the board in place of Mr. Jackson, who was ill. Samuel Bigelow is stillMr. Henchman's place on committees. Mr. Benjamin Whipple was made secretary of the board in place of Mr. Jackson, who was ill. Samuel Bigelow is still teacher of the school at the Neck. Voted that salaries for teachers of summer schools outside the Neck shall not exceed the sums allowed last year, and that the length of the term be the same, twenty weeks. Voted to pay the primary teachers a salary of $225 each. The trustees also considered the expediency of allowing the femal
ss Cutter's (ward 5). October 14 the Winter Hill school was examined. Number enrolled, thirty-five boys and twenty-three girls; present, seventeen and eighteen respectively. There were present of the trustees Messrs. Adams, Jackson, Cutter, and Pool. Remarks were made by several of these gentlemen, and the exercises were closed by an address to the Throne of Grace by Rev. Mr. Jackson. Mr. Joshua O. Colburn was employed to teach the winter school at ward 3 five months, to begin the first Tuesdfrom the warrant for town meeting, to be held March 5, 1827, that measures were taken for a new school building. The site afterwards chosen was on the Training field, and the building committee, consisting of Thomas Hooper, Josiah Harris, and Lot Pool, made their final report in the following December. We learn that the building was fifty-six by thirty-two feet, and stood on a piece of land with ninety-one feet frontage (other dimensions given), and that in the yard was a good well of water wi
Rebecca French (search for this): chapter 3
d about 1813, these schools were of a private character, and the mistresses depended upon their patrons for reimbursement. They were: Mrs. Polly Jaquith, Mrs. Mary Thompson, Mrs. Hannah Rea, Mrs. Mary Walker, Miss Lucy Wyman (succeeded by Miss Rebecca French), Miss Adeline Hyde, and Miss Roxanna Jones. The whole number in these schools was 445; present at the examinations, 385. The trustees are free to declare their belief that the benefit of these institutions will fully meet the most sanguinn E. Whipple, $80; Susan R. Warren, $80; Elizabeth Gerrish, $52.31. In the autumn of 1827 the people at Milk Row were allowed to use their schoolhouse during the recess for a private school. No 2 primary school was vacated by the death of Miss French, and Miss Ann Brown was given the position. The trustees have considered it expedient to, continue the children in the primary schools until they are eight years old. In the eight primary departments there are 533 scholars, with from thirt
Ezekiel D. Dyer (search for this): chapter 3
parent, guardian, or master, and no scholar shall be admitted on any pretense after school shall have been opened fifteen minutes. The winter schools without the Neck were examined as follows: No. 6, by Messrs. Jackson and Whipple, the others by Messrs. Walker and Kelley. The number of scholars on the rolls was, eighty-two for Milk Row, forty for ward 4, thirty-eight for ward 5, and sixty-seven for ward 6 (Winter Hill). The teachers of these schools received for services as follows: Ezekiel D. Dyer, $150; Philemon R. Russell, Jr., $112; Charles Tidd, $102; Andrew Wallis, $160. In the report for ward 6 we read: This school in point of order and discipline has deteriorated since our last visit. The teacher, although he has been uncommonly industrious and devoted, yet a want of that system and method so essential was very apparent. The writing was generally very ordinary, but the trustees do not mean to be understood to say that nothing useful has been taught or learned in this sch
Sarah Perry (search for this): chapter 3
er Adams, and Rev. Henry Jackson of the trustees have charge of the Milk Row and Winter Hill schools; that Miss Charlotte Wayne be employed at the former, and Miss Eliza Wayne at the latter, to teach twenty weeks, at $4.00 per week; and that Miss Sarah Perry be engaged for school No. 4 for the same time, at $3.17 per week. Mr. (James) Russell was empowered to secure a teacher for ward 5, at $3.00 per week. Voted that schools without the Neck be no longer permitted to be closed on the afternoonegin November 1 and to continue through the season. The number of pupils without the Neck in October was 199; in the whole town, 1,144. Of bills approved at this time, Charlotte Wayne; received $84; Eliza Wayne, $88; Cornelius Walker, $200; Sarah Perry, $63; Jane Hobbs, $16; Eliza Ann Cutter, $60; Samuel Bigelow, $150; and (in February) Samuel Barrett, $150. Seven primary schools went into effect May 16, 1825. They were located according to the recommendation of last year. For the first
Eliza Ann Cutter (search for this): chapter 3
; Mr. John Parker, of Chelmsford, was engaged for the ward 6 school, at $32, from November 15; Philemon R. Russell, Jr., received the appointment to ward 4, at $27; and Bowan A. Tufts for ward 5, at $26, both to begin November 1 and to continue through the season. The number of pupils without the Neck in October was 199; in the whole town, 1,144. Of bills approved at this time, Charlotte Wayne; received $84; Eliza Wayne, $88; Cornelius Walker, $200; Sarah Perry, $63; Jane Hobbs, $16; Eliza Ann Cutter, $60; Samuel Bigelow, $150; and (in February) Samuel Barrett, $150. Seven primary schools went into effect May 16, 1825. They were located according to the recommendation of last year. For the first time we are permitted to give the names of the primary teachers of Charlestown, for up to this date, except for a brief period about 1813, these schools were of a private character, and the mistresses depended upon their patrons for reimbursement. They were: Mrs. Polly Jaquith, Mrs. Ma
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