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Shrewsbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ighborhood as No. 6, and the one at the extremity of the town as No. 7. Mr. Tenney had the care of No. 4 and No. 5 Mr. Wyman of No. 6 and No. 7. The summer schools were examined Wednesday, October 14, and the teachers, according to this numbering, were Miss Mary Dodge, Miss Catherine Blanchard, Miss M. Whittemore, and Miss Maria A. Stearns. The two former received $112, the two latter $78. The male teachers for the winter schools in these four districts were: Joseph S. Hastings, of Shrewsbury, for the Woburn Road school; P. R. Russell, Jr., for the West Cambridge Road school; William Sawyer, Jr., for Winter Hill; and Henry C. Allen, of Bridgewater, for Milk Row. All Were to begin the first Monday in December. Lewis Colby, of Cambridge College, seems to have taken Mr. Hastings' place for a few weeks. January 18, 1830, Mr. Allen requested to be relieved from further services on account of some unpleasant circumstances having occurred from want of suitable discipline in his sch
Bridgewater (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
schools were examined Wednesday, October 14, and the teachers, according to this numbering, were Miss Mary Dodge, Miss Catherine Blanchard, Miss M. Whittemore, and Miss Maria A. Stearns. The two former received $112, the two latter $78. The male teachers for the winter schools in these four districts were: Joseph S. Hastings, of Shrewsbury, for the Woburn Road school; P. R. Russell, Jr., for the West Cambridge Road school; William Sawyer, Jr., for Winter Hill; and Henry C. Allen, of Bridgewater, for Milk Row. All Were to begin the first Monday in December. Lewis Colby, of Cambridge College, seems to have taken Mr. Hastings' place for a few weeks. January 18, 1830, Mr. Allen requested to be relieved from further services on account of some unpleasant circumstances having occurred from want of suitable discipline in his school. His resignation was accepted, and Lewis Colby, a member of the Cambridge school, was put in charge. From bills approved we learn that Mr. Allen rece
Winter Hill (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
n for this year the fact that the school districts were re-numbered, that at Winter Hill being known henceforth as No. 4, that at Milk Row as No. 5, the one in the A. Russell, Jr., for the West Cambridge Road school; William Sawyer, Jr., for Winter Hill; and Henry C. Allen, of Bridgewater, for Milk Row. All Were to begin the firoved, and appeared well at the examination. Captain Tenney examined No. 4 (Winter Hill). Thirty-five were present out of the fifty-two enrolled. The captain did nlk Row; Ebenezer Smith, Jr., for tile Gardner district; and Moses W. Walker, Winter Hill. Before the end of the term, Mr. Smith had been succeeded by L. W. Stanton, and George W. Brown had charge for two months at Winter Hill. The schools at No. 4 and No. 5 are now allowed to be kept through the entire year. Messrs. Runey andat Milk Row, who was to receive $16 per month; Miss Abby Mead, of Woburn, at Winter Hill; Miss Whittemore, for the Russell district; and Miss Mary W. Jeffurds, for t
Sarah A. Mead (search for this): chapter 8
resident), George W. Warren, Charles Forster, John Sanborn, Eliah P. Mackintire (treasurer), Frederick Robinson (secretary), Francis Bowman. 1841, John C. Magoun, M. F. Haley, Philander Ames, Alfred Allen, Frederick Robinson, Richard Frothingham, Jr., E. P. Mackintire, Charles Forster, John Sanborn, Francis Bowman, George W. Tyler (?). 1830-1831. The (summer) schools beyond the Neck were kept six months, beginning with the third Monday in April. Miss Abigail Bradley (No. 4)and Miss Sarah A. Mead (No. 5) received $16 per month, and Miss Miranda Whittemore (No. 6) and Miss Phebe W. Wiley (No. 7) received $13 per month. Before the end of the term Miss Wiley was succeeded by Miss Mary Dodge. John Runey and Guy C. Hawkins had charge of the outside schools, and were empowered to take a school census in wards 4 and 5. Later they report seventy-six scholars in the former and 109 in the latter, between the ages of four and fifteen. The committee appointed to consider the subject o
S. N. Cooke (search for this): chapter 8
Esq., and after amendment was adopted. 1831-1832. The teachers for the summer term without the Neck, to begin April 1, 1831, were: Miss Catherine Blanchard, at Milk Row, who was to receive $16 per month; Miss Abby Mead, of Woburn, at Winter Hill; Miss Whittemore, for the Russell district; and Miss Mary W. Jeffurds, for the Gardner district. The teachers for the winter term, with $32 a month at No. 4 land No. 5, $30 at No. 6, and $28 at No. 7, were Moses W. Walker, John N. Sherman, S. N. Cooke, and E. W. Sanborn, respectively. The trustees vote to hold their meetings the last Monday evening of each month, as usual. Mr. Frothingham is authorized, July 25, to commence prosecution against boys for engaging in breaking the glass in the Neck schoolhouse. October 4 it is recorded that smallpox has appeared in town and threatens to spread in some of the primary departments. Consequently it is voted that no scholar be allowed to attend any of the public schools after to-morr
Reuben Swan (search for this): chapter 8
ight years of age, and averaging sixty-three in each school. Early in the spring of 1831 L. Gulliver resigned as writing teacher at the Town Hill school, and Reuben Swan succeeded him. About the same time Mr. Conant, at the Training Field school, was followed by Amos Barker. The other male teachers on the peninsula at this time Miss Jaquith, of the primary teachers, resigned this year. February 2, 1832, the resignation of Samuel Bigelow, of the Neck school, Was accepted, also that of Reuben Swan, of the Female Writing school, both having entered other occupations. The salary of the former was $600, of the latter $500. Moses W. Walker, of the Winter Hill school, was elected to the Neck school, and Thomas Stephenson to succeed Mr. Swan. As Mr. Stephenson's health was delicate, after two months he was succeeded by James Swan at the same salary, $500. At the close of the season, on the recommendation of Mr. Hawkins, the services of John N. Sherman were retained at Milk Row at $
Alfred Allen (search for this): chapter 8
reasurer), Paul Willard (secretary), Amos Hazeltine, Joseph F. Tufts, Captain Larkin Turner (president), John Stevens, Alfred Allen. 1836, Charles Thompson (president), J. W. Valentine, M. D., George W. Warren (treasurer), Alfred Allen, James UndeAlfred Allen, James Underwood, Charles Forster, Thomas Browne, Jr. (secretary). 1837, the same. 1838, Richard Frothingham, Jr., Charles Forster, Alfred Allen, Thomas Browne, Jr., George W. Warren, James Underwood, Eliah P. Mackintire. 1839, the same, except that JoAlfred Allen, Thomas Browne, Jr., George W. Warren, James Underwood, Eliah P. Mackintire. 1839, the same, except that John Sanborn succeeds Mr. Mackintire. 1840, Richard Frothingham, Jr. (president), George W. Warren, Charles Forster, John Sanborn, Eliah P. Mackintire (treasurer), Frederick Robinson (secretary), Francis Bowman. 1841, John C. Magoun, M. F. Haley, Philander Ames, Alfred Allen, Frederick Robinson, Richard Frothingham, Jr., E. P. Mackintire, Charles Forster, John Sanborn, Francis Bowman, George W. Tyler (?). 1830-1831. The (summer) schools beyond the Neck were kept six months, beginning w
Lewis Colby (search for this): chapter 8
, for Winter Hill; and Henry C. Allen, of Bridgewater, for Milk Row. All Were to begin the first Monday in December. Lewis Colby, of Cambridge College, seems to have taken Mr. Hastings' place for a few weeks. January 18, 1830, Mr. Allen requestedasant circumstances having occurred from want of suitable discipline in his school. His resignation was accepted, and Lewis Colby, a member of the Cambridge school, was put in charge. From bills approved we learn that Mr. Allen received $51.68; Mr. Hastings, $98; Mr. Russell, $120; Mr. Colby, $76.40; and Mr. Sawyer, $124. At the examination of No. 7, Messrs. Wyman and Jackson reported that Mr. Hastings had taught the school with much ability, and they were highly gratified. No. 6 was also commended by the examiners, Messrs. Wyman and Walker. Mr. Colby's school was examined by Chester Adams. Forty-eight were present out of a total of seventy-four. This school has given the trustees much anxiety, but since it was under the present ma
nce prosecution against boys for engaging in breaking the glass in the Neck schoolhouse. October 4 it is recorded that smallpox has appeared in town and threatens to spread in some of the primary departments. Consequently it is voted that no scholar be allowed to attend any of the public schools after to-morrow who has not been vaccinated. This order was rescinded December 26. Voted that Election vacation stand as formerly, viz., the last week in May and the first Monday in June. Miss Gates and Miss Jaquith, of the primary teachers, resigned this year. February 2, 1832, the resignation of Samuel Bigelow, of the Neck school, Was accepted, also that of Reuben Swan, of the Female Writing school, both having entered other occupations. The salary of the former was $600, of the latter $500. Moses W. Walker, of the Winter Hill school, was elected to the Neck school, and Thomas Stephenson to succeed Mr. Swan. As Mr. Stephenson's health was delicate, after two months he was succeed
Richard Frothingham (search for this): chapter 8
er), Alfred Allen, James Underwood, Charles Forster, Thomas Browne, Jr. (secretary). 1837, the same. 1838, Richard Frothingham, Jr., Charles Forster, Alfred Allen, Thomas Browne, Jr., George W. Warren, James Underwood, Eliah P. Mackintire. 1839, the same, except that John Sanborn succeeds Mr. Mackintire. 1840, Richard Frothingham, Jr. (president), George W. Warren, Charles Forster, John Sanborn, Eliah P. Mackintire (treasurer), Frederick Robinson (secretary), Francis Bowman. 1841, John C. Magoun, M. F. Haley, Philander Ames, Alfred Allen, Frederick Robinson, Richard Frothingham, Jr., E. P. Mackintire, Charles Forster, John Sanborn, Francis Bowman, George W. Tyler (?). 1830-1831. The (summer) schools beyond the Neck werenborn, respectively. The trustees vote to hold their meetings the last Monday evening of each month, as usual. Mr. Frothingham is authorized, July 25, to commence prosecution against boys for engaging in breaking the glass in the Neck schoolho
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