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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910. Search the whole document.

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Rindge (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
er names of teachers at this school, not found upon the records, but vouched for by my informants, were: Ruth, daughter of Luke Wyman; Jason Bigelow Perry, Rindge (N. H.) Town History: John Perry (James and Lydia), baptized in West Cambridge in 1755; married (second wife) Abigail Bigelow, daughter of Jason and Abigail (Witt) Bi, 1793, died unmarried March 19, 1842. The youngest of the family was Jason Bigelow Perry, born September 27, 1801. Colonel J. B. Perry lived on the homestead in Rindge. He showed commendable interest in the welfare of the town, the schools, and all laudable public enterprises. He was an influential and useful citizen, and was Sally Wilson, daughter of Major Supply and Sally (Scripture) Wilson, of New Ipswich. They had nine children. He was living in 1875. [To be Continued.] of Rindge, N. H., and brother of Miss Perry already mentioned; a Mr. Munroe; and Miss Georgiana Adams, of Medford. During the summer of 1838 repairs were made on the school
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ars; Mary Warren. For the summer of 1834 Miss Martha McKoun, of Charlestown, was the teacher. Mrs. Cook remembers her well. Wyman's Charlestown says that John McKoun, printer, by wife Abigail had a daughter, Martha K., born June 22, 1816. The year 1836 is interesting, as it introduces to us the name of that faithful and very efficient teacher, Miss Sarah M. Burnham, who began her labors in Charlestown at the Russell District (or was it at Gardner Row?). Later she was transferred to Winter Hill for a term, and then to Milk Row, but it was in Cambridge that she made one of the grandest of records. (See Historic Leaves, Vol. VII., No. 2.) Other teachers for the summer, up to the formation of Somerville, were Miss Mary B. Gardner in 1837. Miss Clara D. Whittemore for 1838, 1839, and 1840, and Miss Elizabeth A. Caverno for 1841. Miss Gardner was the daughter of Miles Gardner, who resided just over the Alewife Brook on the Arlington side. She married a Mr. Pierce, and was last
Lunenburg, Ma. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
s a teacher in the Prospect Hill School Damon Genealogy, page 55, etc.: Rev. David Damon (grave at Arlington), born in Wayland September 12, 1787; graduated from Harvard in 1811; studied theology in the Cambridge Divinity School; ordained at Lunenburg in 1815; installed at West Cambridge in 1835; died June 25, 1843, in his fifty-sixth year; made D. D. by Harvard the day before his death; married October 16, 1815, Rebecca Derby, of Lynnfield; she died in Boston in October, 1852 (born in 1787). Son, Norwood, born in Lunenburg October 7, 1816; never married; resided in Boston.; Samuel (or Richard) Swan, not related to the other Swan family; Levi Russell, 1836-37, and again 1840-41, The Russells told the writer that George Swan lived at Arlington, and used to drive past every day on the way to school. On records I find George Swan and Eliza Ramsdell, intention, August 24, 1834. who was also employed at Prospect Hill, and whose career as a teacher we shall endeavor to notice in som
Canaan, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
, 1814. Clarissa D., their fourth child, baptized May 17, 1812; fifth child was Amos, a merchant and inventor; sixth child was James Russell Whittemore, born in 1818. Mrs. Cook says that Clara D. died of a cancer and unmarried. Miss Caverno, according to the printed genealogy of her family, was born November 29, 1829, and died November 19, 1855. She was the granddaughter of Jeremiah and Margaret (Brewster) Caverno, and daughter of Arthur and Olive H. (Foss) Caverno. Her people were of Canaan, N. H., or vicinity. While teaching here she boarded at the Gardners', next door to the schoolhouse. Other names of teachers at this school, not found upon the records, but vouched for by my informants, were: Ruth, daughter of Luke Wyman; Jason Bigelow Perry, Rindge (N. H.) Town History: John Perry (James and Lydia), baptized in West Cambridge in 1755; married (second wife) Abigail Bigelow, daughter of Jason and Abigail (Witt) Bigelow, of Marlboro. Of their children, Sarah, born June 12
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
he rank of colonel. He served in the Legislature of 1852 and 1853; was selectman sixteen years; chairman of War Committee during the Rebellion; for thirty years treasurer of the Congregational Society. He married November 11, 1828, Sally Wilson, daughter of Major Supply and Sally (Scripture) Wilson, of New Ipswich. They had nine children. He was living in 1875. [To be Continued.] of Rindge, N. H., and brother of Miss Perry already mentioned; a Mr. Munroe; and Miss Georgiana Adams, of Medford. During the summer of 1838 repairs were made on the school building, under the direction of the local trustees, Alfred Allen and James Underwood, at an expense of $248.74. From December, 1839, when the first grammar school on Somerville soil was established at Prospect Hill, until the division of the town, the school we have been considering was known as the ungraded district school in the Russell District. On the formation of Somerville in 1842, and the separation of school districts
Unity, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Charlestown control, and also the first and second winters after Somerville was established. Mr. Russell was employed more than once to teach at West Cambridge, in the district known as the Rocks. Philemon Robbins Russell was born January 2, 1795, and died June 6, 1863, at the age of sixty-eight. He received his education in an academy at Lexington. Russell Street of this city was named for him, and it was in that neighborhood that he lived and died. He married Miss Mary Wilkins, of Unity, N. H., and was survived by two daughters, Mary M., the wife of Edwin R. Prescott, and Susan E., the second wife of the late Amos Haynes. The annual report of the trustees for 1838-39 says of Mr. Russell: His efforts and skill are worthy of the highest commendation. He insisted upon the thoroughness of all his pupils. His uniform practice is, if a pupil makes a blunder in recitation, he is compelled afterwards to repeat that part of his answer correctly, as a word going around the class must
Dedham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
of Miles Gardner, who resided just over the Alewife Brook on the Arlington side. She married a Mr. Pierce, and was last known to be living at an advanced age in Dedham, where she had a daughter who was a teacher in the public schools there. Arlington Vital Records: Mary Gardner and Oliver Pierce, intention, December 25, 1842; Miles T. Gardner, of Dedham, and Martha E. Cotting, May 24, 1838. Dedham Records: Oliver Pierce, of Dedham, and Miss Mary Gardner, of West Cambridge, intention, December 25, 1842. Miss Whittemore, the trustees' report says, brought the school from a state of confusion to one of discipline, and inspired so much confidence that shDedham, and Miss Mary Gardner, of West Cambridge, intention, December 25, 1842. Miss Whittemore, the trustees' report says, brought the school from a state of confusion to one of discipline, and inspired so much confidence that she was hired by the newly-elected committee of Somerville to resume her position at this school in 1842. At her examination, Friday, October 28, 1842, there were present of the committee Messrs. Hawkins, Allen, Adams, Russell, and Hill. Miss Whittemore came of a West Cambridge family. Perhaps she was this one (Arlington Record
Lynn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ngs, son of Jonas and Lucy, born June 8, 1796; Joseph S. Hastings and Joanna Newton, of Westboro, married at West Cambridge June 14, 1833. Miss Whittemore, who had taught acceptably for five successive summers, was succeeded in 1833 by Miss Kezia Russell, daughter of William Adams and Kezia Teel Russell, and an elder sister of the late Mrs. Carr and the late Mrs. Rebecca Russell Stearns. Two years later Miss Kezia was again in charge. Soon after this she married a Mr. Hatch, a farmer of Saugus. For the winter of 1833-34 H. K. Curtis, of Stoughton, was the teacher for four months, at a salary of $30 per month. He had forty-one pupils. He was liked as a teacher, and boarded in the family of Philemon R., Sr. Hiram Keith Curtis, of Stoughton, graduated from Harvard College in the class of 1833. He was made A. M., and died in 1888 at East Stoughton, now Avon. After graduation he adopted the profession of civil engineer. He entered the office of Loammi Baldwin at Charlestown, a
Marlboro, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
H. (Foss) Caverno. Her people were of Canaan, N. H., or vicinity. While teaching here she boarded at the Gardners', next door to the schoolhouse. Other names of teachers at this school, not found upon the records, but vouched for by my informants, were: Ruth, daughter of Luke Wyman; Jason Bigelow Perry, Rindge (N. H.) Town History: John Perry (James and Lydia), baptized in West Cambridge in 1755; married (second wife) Abigail Bigelow, daughter of Jason and Abigail (Witt) Bigelow, of Marlboro. Of their children, Sarah, born June 12, 1793, died unmarried March 19, 1842. The youngest of the family was Jason Bigelow Perry, born September 27, 1801. Colonel J. B. Perry lived on the homestead in Rindge. He showed commendable interest in the welfare of the town, the schools, and all laudable public enterprises. He was an influential and useful citizen, and was much employed in public affairs. He received a commission in the Twelfth Regiment of Militia, and retired with the rank of
Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
e it takes. After 1829 our school, which is sometimes designated on the records as the West Cambridge Road School, was officially known as District No. 6. During the following winter, 1830-31, James Swan was appointed to teach in the Russell District. He completed the term, and the next year at the Female Writing School, Charlestown, closely followed Reuben Swan, who had resigned February 2, 1832. According to Wyman, who gives this line of Swans, Reuben and James, the latter born in Dorchester in 1809, were the sons of Reuben Swan, Sr., and Ruth Teel, who were married in 1804. Seven of their sons, including the two mentioned, were school teachers. According to my informants, this family at one time lived on North Street, West Somerville, on the old Cook place, which had originally belonged to the Teels (the mother's people). The winter term for 1831-32 was taught by S. N. Cooke. Mrs. Carr told me that he was an Englishman, and a fine man. She was twelve years old that winter
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