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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903. Search the whole document.

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William Brackenbury (search for this): chapter 12
now East Somerville, Prospect, Central, and Spring hills, the southerly slope of Winter hill, and a considerable portion of West Somerville, its boundaries not being very clearly defined at that time. The dividing of this common ground among the citizens, or stinting of the pasture, as they termed it, received attention as early as 1635—a committee being then appointed to consider the matter. At a town meeting held February 6, 1636 (27th 1637 n. s.) four of the inhabitants, viz., William Brackenbury, Ezekial Richeson, Thomas Ewar, and Ralph Sprague, were chosen to assist the selectmen in Stinting the common and considering of the great Lotts according to portion. They were to meet monthly for that purpose. In making their apportionment of rights in the common pasturage, the committee at this time (1627) decided to value a person at three cows, and in their records of later years, the size of a common or stint of land for one cow was one and one-half acres, so that it would seem
Joseph Lynde (search for this): chapter 12
the affirmative:— 1.—That there should be one Acre & a halfe layd out to a Common. 2.—Where they would have this Land layd out, it was Voted & past for the neerr or hither part of the Comon. 3.—Whether this Land should be for ever or for years, It past for a good Inheritance in ffee Simple. 4.—That a Comitte may be Chosen for the heareing & proveing & confirmjng of the Titles of Clajmers to the respective Commons. 5.—The Committee were then Chosen by Vote, & are, viz.— Mr. Joseph LyndeCapt. Ricd SpragueCapt Lar Hammond James Russell Esqr.Lieut Jno Cutter 6.—That Sergt Ricd Lowden, Josiah Wood, Snr, and Tho: White be Impowrd to gether Up the Rent due to ye proprietors, wch monv is to be delivered to sd Comitte for defraying of Charges that arise by Surveying, Laying out & Clearing of, &c. 7.—That the Common be measured by the Care of ye Committee so that ye numbr of Acres thereon may be known. 8.—That it be left wth ye Comitte wch are Empowered
Ezekial Richeson (search for this): chapter 12
e, Prospect, Central, and Spring hills, the southerly slope of Winter hill, and a considerable portion of West Somerville, its boundaries not being very clearly defined at that time. The dividing of this common ground among the citizens, or stinting of the pasture, as they termed it, received attention as early as 1635—a committee being then appointed to consider the matter. At a town meeting held February 6, 1636 (27th 1637 n. s.) four of the inhabitants, viz., William Brackenbury, Ezekial Richeson, Thomas Ewar, and Ralph Sprague, were chosen to assist the selectmen in Stinting the common and considering of the great Lotts according to portion. They were to meet monthly for that purpose. In making their apportionment of rights in the common pasturage, the committee at this time (1627) decided to value a person at three cows, and in their records of later years, the size of a common or stint of land for one cow was one and one-half acres, so that it would seem from these records
Jonathan Mousalls (search for this): chapter 12
o be paid by the proprietors: This wee propose as necessary for the future Settlement of the right of each proprietor; for the prevention of all after disputes relating there Unto. Thirdly, Wee conceive it necessary that one Acre & A halfe of Land to A Common (According to the Vote of the proprietor), be Laid out at the hither end of the Comon, Excluding all necessary Highwayes, both publicke and private. Fourthly, Wee propose that the piece of Land lying next the Towne, viz.: from Jno. Mousalls gate, Upon A Line Over to the lower Corner of Thomas Crasswells Land, all yt Land within that line Unto the Neck of Land, be Left in Common for publick military Exercises, &c. Fifthly, It will be necessary yt the laying out of the proportions of Land to Each Commoner, or proprietor, be referred Unto A Committe of meet prsons to be chosen together with the Artist, who are to Regulate the Same, According to their best discretions, in the most Equitable manner; the proprietors Voted the
Ensigne David (search for this): chapter 12
in Charles Towne bounds on this Side Menotamies River (being called the Stinted Pasture) Unto the proprietors thereof (According Unto A Vote of thiers past, when Conveened together March Tenth, 1684-5), which was Effected and performed by their Committee (Chosen and Confirmed by the Said proprietors March 27th, 1685), who haveing finished the said worke, The Selectmen of Said Towne being satisfied therewith, Ordered it, yt each mans proprietie in the Said Land According to the platt of Ensigne David ffiske the Surveyor (According to Law) be recorded in the Towns booke of records, to be their propper Right, and Estate. This record shows that a plan was made of this last division; I think no such plan has ever been discovered, yet a description of each lot is recorded, and the whole record is much more definite than in any of the previous allotments. This last division extended as far as Alewife brook; it covered 650 acres of land. These two divisions, or Dividents, as they we
lestown church, and town clerk for many years. In 1681 action was again taken by the inhabitants of Charlesrtionment was made among the people of the town, and 1681, there were numerous transfers of titles to rights ilan to guide them. Why it was deemed necessary in 1681 to again revive the question of titles in the Stintedivision of 1636, or in any other record previous to 1681, to show whether their tenure was forever or temporat they were for all time. In every sale previous to 1681, the deed simply gives the number of cow commons, buave been the cause which led to a reapportionment in 1681, the records of which begin as follows, viz.:— Chy this meeting reported on December 15 (25th n. s.), 1681, as follows: First, that wee have wth much pai divisions could be made. In these two divisions of 1681 and 1685 the common land was laid out in ranges, runs. The rangeways, though spoken of in the record of 1681 as being twenty-four feet in width, are later record
e main, the Cow commones, the Stinted Pasture, the Stinted Common, and the land without the neck, meaning the land beyond the neck. This tract embraced what is now East Somerville, Prospect, Central, and Spring hills, the southerly slope of Winter hill, and a considerable portion of West Somerville, its boundaries not being very clearly defined at that time. The dividing of this common ground among the citizens, or stinting of the pasture, as they termed it, received attention as early as 1635—a committee being then appointed to consider the matter. At a town meeting held February 6, 1636 (27th 1637 n. s.) four of the inhabitants, viz., William Brackenbury, Ezekial Richeson, Thomas Ewar, and Ralph Sprague, were chosen to assist the selectmen in Stinting the common and considering of the great Lotts according to portion. They were to meet monthly for that purpose. In making their apportionment of rights in the common pasturage, the committee at this time (1627) decided to value a
— John Greene, Recorder. This John Greene was ruling elder of the Charlestown church, and town clerk for many years. In 1681 action was again taken by the inhabitants of Charlestown regarding the division of the Stinted common. Between 1636, when the first apportionment was made among the people of the town, and 1681, there were numerous transfers of titles to rights in the common, from one owner to another, but in none of these transfers, nor in the records of 1638, and later years,o again revive the question of titles in the Stinted Pasture I do not know. The question may have arisen before, and evidently did then, whether or not these titles were permanent; there seems to have been nothing in the record of the division of 1636, or in any other record previous to 1681, to show whether their tenure was forever or temporary, but I think the persons receiving the grants believed that they were for all time. In every sale previous to 1681, the deed simply gives the number o
land beyond the neck. This tract embraced what is now East Somerville, Prospect, Central, and Spring hills, the southerly slope of Winter hill, and a considerable portion of West Somerville, its boundaries not being very clearly defined at that time. The dividing of this common ground among the citizens, or stinting of the pasture, as they termed it, received attention as early as 1635—a committee being then appointed to consider the matter. At a town meeting held February 6, 1636 (27th 1637 n. s.) four of the inhabitants, viz., William Brackenbury, Ezekial Richeson, Thomas Ewar, and Ralph Sprague, were chosen to assist the selectmen in Stinting the common and considering of the great Lotts according to portion. They were to meet monthly for that purpose. In making their apportionment of rights in the common pasturage, the committee at this time (1627) decided to value a person at three cows, and in their records of later years, the size of a common or stint of land for one cow
t of land for one cow was one and one-half acres, so that it would seem from these records that each settler was entitled in this division to rights in four and one-half acres of grazing land, although this afterwards may have been changed. In 1638 the rights of the different owners in the Stinted pasture were registered in the town's book of possessions, and again in 1648 and in 1653-4. At a meeting of the selectmen on the thirteenth day of February, 1657, n. s., all the proprietary rights common. Between 1636, when the first apportionment was made among the people of the town, and 1681, there were numerous transfers of titles to rights in the common, from one owner to another, but in none of these transfers, nor in the records of 1638, and later years, or in the confirmation of titles in 1657, is there any description of lots by bounds, or any reference to rangeways or streets, or any plan mentioned covering the territory laid out and allotted. It is probable that some survey
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