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Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
f the house, throwing his arms wildly about his head, his face white as a sheet, and his eyes bulging with excitement, and shouted, My God! they have killed the President! Abe Lincoln's dead! Shot! He ran all the way from Temple street, near Broadway, across lots to tell the sad news. He nearly collapsed after delivering his message. The excitement about that little house was intense, the family, the brickmakers, the teamsters all crowded about us, and stood dazed by the awful intelligences tenants, and every year when cherries were ripe would invite them to come on a certain day and pick and eat cherries to their hearts' content. It was a red letter day for the brickmakers. There was a brickmaker, Chauncey Holt, who lived on Broadway (the big elm standing now in the middle of the road was just by the front or street end of his house), for whom Chauncey avenue was named. There was Albert Kenneson, also, who lived nearly opposite Holt, another of the turnpike brickmakers. Bo
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
nstruction of the corduroy road over Charlestown Neck may now be seen at the Historical Society's headquarters. Then the Winter Hill road, through to the Ford of the Mistick, was built, a country road, steep over the hill, and trying to both team and driver; gradually it had been pushed further back into the wilderness, accommodating at this time a community of farmers, whose crops and wood and supplies were slowly and tediously hauled over the route to and from the growing metropolis of New England, as had been the method for a hundred and fifty years or so. The sturdy farmer drove his own ox-wagon in those early times; two or three miles an hour was good doing. A trip to Boston occupied several days, albeit the distance might be less than twenty-five miles. It was the era of horseback-riding, of the saddle-bag and pillion. At every store stood many saddle-horses. Nearly all vehicles were of the heavy styles known as freighters or farm wagons. But little traveling was indulge
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
state, perhaps, that of all the brickmakers along the turnpike, Mark Fisk made himself felt more than the others; financially stronger, perhaps, than the others, he was looked up to by the smaller makers, some of whom were in his debt and carried on the business with the aid of Fisk's money. He owned twenty-two acres of land,—clay land and ledge,—was more progressive than the others, for it was Mark Fisk and Gardner Ring who bought of the patentees the sole right to make and sell in Eastern Massachusetts glazed bricks, tiles, etc. This was in 1839. Unlike the white enamelled brick of to-day, such as we see in the subway, their process put a gloss on the common red bricks; but the movement was too soon by a generation, and few, if any, were ever put upon the market. Next in importance among the brickmakers was David Washburn. A part of the years he operated two yards. The older residents of Somerville will remember him; he was a very large man, had a slight impediment in his speec
Cary (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
or shall be associated with them and their successors shall be a corporation by the name of The Medford Turnpike Corporation; and shall by that name sue and be sued, and enjoy all the privileges and powers which are by law incident to corporations, for the purpose of laying out and making a turnpike road from the easterly side of the road nearly opposite to Dr. Luther Stearns' house in Medford, and running easterly of Winter hill and Ploughed Hill to the east side of the road opposite to Page's Tavern, near the Neck in Charlestown, and for keeping the same in repair. Provided, that if the said corporation shall neglect to complete the said turnpike road for the space of three years after the passing of this act the same shall be void. Provided, however, that if the said road should be laid out across any grounds, the privileges of which have been heretofore granted to the proprietors of the Middlesex Canal for the purpose of cutting a canal, the proprietors of the said Medford Tur
Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 6
urnpike as well, so that taken together the brick industry contributed no mean proportion of the receipts from tolls of the old turnpike. Who did the work? In the earlier days the workmen were Yankees from the back country, from the New Hampshire and Maine farms largely. They were paid twelve dollars a month and board, working from sunrise till the stars appeared in the evening. Afterward the Irish, green from the bogs, were employed. These after a time gave way to the bluenoses from Nova Scotia, while all these later years French Canadians have monopolized the business of making bricks. They received from twenty-six to thirty dollars a month and board. In the early days when Yankees did the work the clay was dug out by hand; as the pit increased in depth the clay had to be shoveled over two or three times before it reached the surface, which is very different from the methods of to-day, where steam-shovels and cars do the work in many modern yards. Some of the brickmakers own
Malden Bridge (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
was longer than the celebrated London bridge over the Thames, and as a triumph of engineering skill was not surpassed by any other in existence. It was planned and built by Lemuel Cox, of Medford, a shipwright. This same man, in 1787, built Malden bridge, and later, the old Essex bridge at Salem. On the completion of the structure a great celebration occurred in Charlestown, a vast feast was given; this took place on the 17th of June, and was a grand gala occasion. Poetry and song entered in bricks per year were made between the Charlestown line and the Cutter mill. Ten thousand cords of wood alone were teamed over the turnpike yearly, to say nothing of great quantities of sand. Most of the wood was landed from schooners below Malden bridge; this was spruce and hemlock,—round wood. After being thrown on to the wharf men were employed to split it, it being considered profitable to buy it round and split it afterward; it would measure more. The sand came largely from the Simpso
Middlesex Canal (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ate, the county, the city, and the town seemingly vie with each other in their efforts to improve the highways, and so facilitate the transportation of merchandise from point to point. Not so in the early years of the past century; any old thing of a road was thought good enough for the farmers, although at that time the hauling was all practically done by this class of the community. You know about the time of the chartering of the Boston & Lowell railroad, the officials of the old Middlesex Canal went upon record as stating, that no railroad, no corporation could compete with the farmer in this teaming business, because the farmer, having the necessary paraphernalia which he used in his business as an agriculturist upon his farm and in moving his crops and supplies, could team goods over the roads cheaper than anyone else, and it was useless to think he couldn't. The farmers did starve out the old canal company; it would seem by the above statement that its officials were willin
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
The one outlet from Boston on the north was by way of the new Charlestown bridge. This bridge, built in 1786, was the marvel of the times, a sort of a seven days wonder to the people of that time. It was longer than the celebrated London bridge over the Thames, and as a triumph of engineering skill was not surpassed by any other in existence. It was planned and built by Lemuel Cox, of Medford, a shipwright. This same man, in 1787, built Malden bridge, and later, the old Essex bridge at Salem. On the completion of the structure a great celebration occurred in Charlestown, a vast feast was given; this took place on the 17th of June, and was a grand gala occasion. Poetry and song entered into the programme. Here is a specimen of the verses:— I sing the day in which the bridge Is finish-ed and done. Boston and Charlestown lads, rejoice! And fire your cannon guns! The bridge is finished now, I say, Each other bridge outvies, For London bridge, compared with ours, Appears in dim
John Brook (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
o shorten the route to Charlestown bridge, which served now as the inlet of the whole northern country to Boston—to open a direct, level and thoroughly constructed road from Medford to connect with this highway,—to connect also with Milk Row road and the new Cambridge bridge. As in the case of the Middlesex Canal, so in the movement which resulted in the building of the turnpike, Medford people were prominent. Three of the five incorporators of the turnpike corporation, Benjamin Hall, John Brooks, and Ebenezer Hall, were also among the petitioners for an act to incorporate the Canal company ten years previous (1793). On the 2nd of March, 1803, the charter declared that the above-named with Fitch Hall and Samuel Buel and all such persons as are or shall be associated with them and their successors shall be a corporation by the name of The Medford Turnpike Corporation; and shall by that name sue and be sued, and enjoy all the privileges and powers which are by law incident to corpor
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
stence. It was planned and built by Lemuel Cox, of Medford, a shipwright. This same man, in 1787, built Malde direct, level and thoroughly constructed road from Medford to connect with this highway,—to connect also with ent which resulted in the building of the turnpike, Medford people were prominent. Three of the five incorporaoad nearly opposite to Dr. Luther Stearns' house in Medford, and running easterly of Winter hill and Ploughed Hroute. Later Colonel Jaques and the Cutters at the Medford line were the only intermediate dwellers on the linwas by way of Temple street to Winter Hill road. To Medford and the back towns, therefore, together with such othe only building standing in Somerville, if not in Medford, that stood along the turnpike originally. It is sy opposite the mill, and opened on to Main streeet, Medford, where the entrance to Combination Park is now; aftkyard adjoined the premises. I was driving in from Medford; having a little business there, I drove across fro
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