hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 227 5 Browse Search
Henry W. Longfellow 164 0 Browse Search
Henry Longfellow 151 1 Browse Search
Mary S. P. Longfellow 124 0 Browse Search
Alice M. Longfellow 114 2 Browse Search
William C. Bryant 76 0 Browse Search
Samuel Longfellow 74 4 Browse Search
New England (United States) 68 0 Browse Search
Washington Irving 52 0 Browse Search
John A. Lowell 50 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Search the whole document.

Found 83 total hits in 50 results.

1 2 3 4 5
West Indies (search for this): chapter 11
t is far finer in respect to rooms, especially in the upper stories. It was built, in all probability, in 1759 by Colonel John Vassall, whose family owned the still older house across the way now called the Batchelder House; and there is a tradition of a subterranean passage between the two houses, although this has hitherto been sought in vain. Both these dwellings belonged to a series of large houses on Brattle Street, called Tory Row, whose proprietors were almost all kinsfolk, owned West India estates and slaves, entertained company in great affluence, according to the descriptions of the Baroness Riedesel, and were almost all forced to leave the country at the approach of the Revolution. Tradition recalls a Twelfth Night party given by Mrs. Washington in 1776, she having come to visit her husband during his residence in Cambridge. She arrived in great ceremony, with a coach and four black horses, with postilions and servants in scarlet livery. During her visit she and her hu
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Chapter 10: Craigie House In entering on the duties of his Harvard professorship (December, 1836) Longfellow took rooms at the Craigie House in Cambridge. This house, so long his residence, has been claimed as having more historic interest than any house in New England, both from the fact of his ownership and of its having been the headquarters of General Washington during the siege of Boston. It has even been called from these two circumstances the best known residence in the United States, with the exception of Mt. Vernon, with which it has some analogy both in position and in aspect. It overlooks the Charles River as the other overlooks the Potomac, though the latter view is of course far more imposing, and the Craige House wants the picturesque semicircle of outbuildings so characteristic of Mt. Vernon, while it is far finer in respect to rooms, especially in the upper stories. It was built, in all probability, in 1759 by Colonel John Vassall, whose family owned the stil
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Chapter 10: Craigie House In entering on the duties of his Harvard professorship (December, 1836) Longfellow took rooms at the Craigie House in Cambridge. This house, so long his residence, has been claimed as having more historic interest than any house in New England, both from the fact of his ownership and of its having been the headquarters of General Washington during the siege of Boston. It has even been called from these two circumstances the best known residence in the United States, with the exception of Mt. Vernon, with which it has some analogy both in position and in aspect. It overlooks the Charles River as the other overlooks the Potomac, though the latter view is of course far more imposing, and the Craige House wants the picturesque semicircle of outbuildings so characteristic of Mt. Vernon, while it is far finer in respect to rooms, especially in the upper stories. It was built, in all probability, in 1759 by Colonel John Vassall, whose family owned the stil
Charles (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
t the Craigie House in Cambridge. This house, so long his residence, has been claimed as having more historic interest than any house in New England, both from the fact of his ownership and of its having been the headquarters of General Washington during the siege of Boston. It has even been called from these two circumstances the best known residence in the United States, with the exception of Mt. Vernon, with which it has some analogy both in position and in aspect. It overlooks the Charles River as the other overlooks the Potomac, though the latter view is of course far more imposing, and the Craige House wants the picturesque semicircle of outbuildings so characteristic of Mt. Vernon, while it is far finer in respect to rooms, especially in the upper stories. It was built, in all probability, in 1759 by Colonel John Vassall, whose family owned the still older house across the way now called the Batchelder House; and there is a tradition of a subterranean passage between the t
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ed, she said, to take no more students into the house. But her manner changed when I told her who I was. She said that she had read Outre-Mer, of which one number was lying on her side-board. She then took me all over the house and showed me every room in it, saying, as we went into each, that I could not have that one. She finally consented to my taking the rooms mentioned above, on condition that the door leading into the back entry should be locked on the outside. Young Habersham, of Savannah, a friend of Mrs. Craigie's, occupied at that time the other front chamber. He was a skilful performer on the flute. Like other piping birds, he took wing for the rice-fields of the South when the cold weather came, and I remained alone with the widow in her castle. The back part of the house was occupied, however, by her farmer. His wife supplied my meals and took care of my rooms. She was a giantess, and very pious in words; and when she brought in my breakfast frequently stopped to
d so did President Jared Sparks in 1832. Five years after, Longfellow took the rooms, and thus describes his first visit to Mrs. Craigie:— The first time I was in Craigie House was on a beautiful afternoon in the year 1837. I came to see Mr. McLane, a law-student, who occupied the southeastern chamber. The window-blinds were closed, but through them came a pleasant breeze, and I could see the waters of the Charles gleaming in the meadows. McLane left Cambridge in August, and I took possMcLane left Cambridge in August, and I took possession of his room, making use of it as a library or study, and having the adjoining chamber for my bedroom. At first Mrs. Craigie declined to let me have rooms. I remember how she looked as she stood, in her white turban, with her hands crossed behind her, snapping her gray eyes. She had resolved, she said, to take no more students into the house. But her manner changed when I told her who I was. She said that she had read Outre-Mer, of which one number was lying on her side-board. She th
he had resolved, she said, to take no more students into the house. But her manner changed when I told her who I was. She said that she had read Outre-Mer, of which one number was lying on her side-board. She then took me all over the house and showed me every room in it, saying, as we went into each, that I could not have that one. She finally consented to my taking the rooms mentioned above, on condition that the door leading into the back entry should be locked on the outside. Young Habersham, of Savannah, a friend of Mrs. Craigie's, occupied at that time the other front chamber. He was a skilful performer on the flute. Like other piping birds, he took wing for the rice-fields of the South when the cold weather came, and I remained alone with the widow in her castle. The back part of the house was occupied, however, by her farmer. His wife supplied my meals and took care of my rooms. She was a giantess, and very pious in words; and when she brought in my breakfast frequent
Andrew Craigie (search for this): chapter 11
92, the dates being a little uncertain, by Andrew Craigie, apothecary-general of the northern depart25, 1900, and published in their documents. Mr. Craigie sometimes entertained a hundred guests at tueen Victoria's father, then Prince Edward. Mr. Craigie had large business transactions, speculatedooms, and thus describes his first visit to Mrs. Craigie:— The first time I was in Craigie Houadjoining chamber for my bedroom. At first Mrs. Craigie declined to let me have rooms. I remember Young Habersham, of Savannah, a friend of Mrs. Craigie's, occupied at that time the other front ch, and the house very still. I used to hear Mrs. Craigie go down to breakfast at nine or ten in the the leaves, came spinning down in myriads. Mrs. Craigie used to sit by the open windows and let theto the curiously cosmopolitan atmosphere of Mrs. Craigie's mind. The sale catalogue of her books lire apparently written by a schoolgirl under Mr. Craigie's care; and there was a tradition, not very
r her white turban unmolested. She would have nothing done to protect the trees from these worms; she used to say, Why, sir, they are our fellow-worms; they have as good a right to live as we have. It was certainly a strange chance which threw the young poet, on his return from Europe, into the curiously cosmopolitan atmosphere of Mrs. Craigie's mind. The sale catalogue of her books lies before me, a mass of perhaps five hundred odd volumes of worthy or worthless literature: Goethe's Werther beside the American Frugal Housewife, and Heath's Book of Beauty beside Hannah More. Yet it was doubtless the only house in Cambridge which then held complete sets of Voltaire and Diderot, of Moli-ère, Crebillon, and Florian, Madame de Sevigne and Madame de Stael. Some of the books thus sold form a part to this day of the Longfellow library at Craigie House; but there is no reference to the poet in the original catalogue, except that it includes Outre-Mer, No. 1, doubtless the same copy
De Sevigne (search for this): chapter 11
ch threw the young poet, on his return from Europe, into the curiously cosmopolitan atmosphere of Mrs. Craigie's mind. The sale catalogue of her books lies before me, a mass of perhaps five hundred odd volumes of worthy or worthless literature: Goethe's Werther beside the American Frugal Housewife, and Heath's Book of Beauty beside Hannah More. Yet it was doubtless the only house in Cambridge which then held complete sets of Voltaire and Diderot, of Moli-ère, Crebillon, and Florian, Madame de Sevigne and Madame de Stael. Some of the books thus sold form a part to this day of the Longfellow library at Craigie House; but there is no reference to the poet in the original catalogue, except that it includes Outre-Mer, No. 1, doubtless the same copy which he saw lying on the sideboard. Mr. J. E. Worcester, the lexicographer, shared the house with Longfellow, as did for a time Miss Sally Lowell, an aunt of the poet. Mr. Worcester bought it for himself, and ultimately sold it to Mr. N
1 2 3 4 5