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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ted to abandon the cold Chap. VI.} and sterile clime of New England, and plant themselves in the milder regions on the Delawe, prevented a frequent intercourse between Virginia and New England. It was in vain that the ministers, invited from Boston's Journal, II. 77, 78. 95, 96, and 164, 165. Hubbard's New England, 410 411. Johnson, b. III. c. XI. in II. Mass. Hist.r, and very malignant towards the way of the churches in New England. While Virginia thus displayed, though with comparatidon, two from Bristol, twelve Hollanders, and seven from New England. New Description of Virginia, 15, in II. Mass. Hist. colony. Of itself it inflicted no wound on Virginia or New England. In vain did the Dutch expostulate against the act as d to trammel the industry of Virginia, and Maryland, and New England. His ambition aspired to make England the commercial emny of Virginia enjoyed liberties as large as the favored New England; displayed an equal degree of fondness for popular sover
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
uth were invited to remove within the jurisdiction of Virginia; Puritan 1629. merchants planted themselves on the James River without fear, and emigrants from Massachusetts had 1640. recently established themselves in the colony. The honor of Laud had been vindicated by a judicial sentence, and south of the Potomac the decrees oinvited from Boston by the Puritan settlements in Virginia, carried letters from Winthrop, written to Berkeley and his council by order of the general court of Massachusetts. The hearts of the people were much inflamed with desire after the ordinances; but the missionaries were silenced by the government, and ordered to leave the cginia. Maryland, which was not expressly included in the ordinance, had taken care to acknowledge the new order of things; Langford's Refutation, 6, 7. and Massachusetts, alike unwilling to encounter the hostility of parliament, and jealous of the rights of independent 1651 May 7. legislation, by its own enactment, prohibited
Sweden (Sweden) (search for this): chapter 10
, and Maryland, and New England. His ambition aspired to make England the commercial emporium of the world. His plans extended to the possession of the harbors in the Spanish Netherlands; France was obliged to pledge her aid to conquer, and her consent to yield Dunkirk, Mardyke and Gravelines; and Dunkirk, in the summer of 1658, was given up to his ambassador by the French king in person. Nor was this all: he desired the chief harbors in the North Sea, and the Baltic; and an alliance with Sweden, made not simply from a zeal for Protestantism, was to secure him Bremen, and Elsmore, 1657 and Dantzig, as his reward. Thurloe, VI. 478. Heeren's Works, i. 158. In the West Indies, his commanders planned the capture of Jamaica, which 1655 succeeded; and the attempt at the reduction of Hispaniola, then the chief possession of Spain among the islands, failed only through the incompetency or want Chap. VI.} of concert of his agents. It is as the rival of Holland, the successful anta
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 10
irginia, the Cavaliers, exiles like their monarch, met in frequent groups to recount their toils, to sigh over defeats, and to nourish loyalty and hope. Norwood, in Churchill, VI. 160—186. Hammond's Leah and Rachel, 16. The faithfulness of the Virginians Chap VI.} 1650 June. did not escape the attention of the royal exile; from his retreat in Breda he transmitted to Berkeley a new commission; Chalmers, 122. he still controlled the distribution of offices, and, amidst his defeats in Scotland, Norwood, in Ch., VI. 186. still remembered with favor the faithful Cavaliers in the western world. Charles the Second, a fugitive from England, was still the sovereign of Virginia. Virginia was whole for monarchy, and the last country, belonging to England, that submitted to obedience of the commonwealth. Hammond's Leah and Rachel, 20; Ed. 1656. But the parliament did not long permit its authority to be denied. Having, by the vigorous energy and fearless enthusiasm of republic
Hispaniola (search for this): chapter 10
unkirk, in the summer of 1658, was given up to his ambassador by the French king in person. Nor was this all: he desired the chief harbors in the North Sea, and the Baltic; and an alliance with Sweden, made not simply from a zeal for Protestantism, was to secure him Bremen, and Elsmore, 1657 and Dantzig, as his reward. Thurloe, VI. 478. Heeren's Works, i. 158. In the West Indies, his commanders planned the capture of Jamaica, which 1655 succeeded; and the attempt at the reduction of Hispaniola, then the chief possession of Spain among the islands, failed only through the incompetency or want Chap. VI.} of concert of his agents. It is as the rival of Holland, the successful antagonist of Spain, the protector of English shipping, that Cromwell laid claims to glory. The crown passed from the brow of his sons; his wide plans for the possession of commercial places on the continent were defeated; Dunkirk was restored; the monarchy, which he subverted, was reestablished; the nob
Jamaica, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
quer, and her consent to yield Dunkirk, Mardyke and Gravelines; and Dunkirk, in the summer of 1658, was given up to his ambassador by the French king in person. Nor was this all: he desired the chief harbors in the North Sea, and the Baltic; and an alliance with Sweden, made not simply from a zeal for Protestantism, was to secure him Bremen, and Elsmore, 1657 and Dantzig, as his reward. Thurloe, VI. 478. Heeren's Works, i. 158. In the West Indies, his commanders planned the capture of Jamaica, which 1655 succeeded; and the attempt at the reduction of Hispaniola, then the chief possession of Spain among the islands, failed only through the incompetency or want Chap. VI.} of concert of his agents. It is as the rival of Holland, the successful antagonist of Spain, the protector of English shipping, that Cromwell laid claims to glory. The crown passed from the brow of his sons; his wide plans for the possession of commercial places on the continent were defeated; Dunkirk was
Barbados (Barbados) (search for this): chapter 10
igorous energy and fearless enthusiasm of republicanism, triumphed over all its enemies in Europe, it turned its attention to the Oct. 3. colonies; and a memorable ordinance Hazard, i. 637, 638. Parliamentary History, III. 1357. The commentary of Chalmers, p. 123, is that of a partisan lawyer. at once empowered the council of state to reduce the rebellious colonies to obedience, and, at the same time, established it as a law, that foreign ships should not trade at any of the ports in Barbadoes, Antigua, Bermudas, and Virginia. Maryland, which was not expressly included in the ordinance, had taken care to acknowledge the new order of things; Langford's Refutation, 6, 7. and Massachusetts, alike unwilling to encounter the hostility of parliament, and jealous of the rights of independent 1651 May 7. legislation, by its own enactment, prohibited all intercourse with Virginia, till the supremacy of the commonwealth should be established; although the order, when it was found to
DeRuyter (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
I. 1374, 5, 8. Godwin, III. 381—2. Heeren, i. 156. A naval war soon followed, which Cromwell eager- 1652 ly desired, and Holland as earnestly endeavored to avoid. The spirit of each people was kindled with the highest national enthusiasm; the commerce of the world was the prize contended for; the ocean was the scene of the conflict; and the annals of recorded time had never known so many great naval actions in such quick succession. This was the war in which Blake, and Ayscue, and De Ruyter, gained their glory; and Tromp fixed a broom to his mast in bravado, as if to sweep the English flag from the seas. Cromwell was not disposed to trammel the industry of Virginia, and Maryland, and New England. His ambition aspired to make England the commercial emporium of the world. His plans extended to the possession of the harbors in the Spanish Netherlands; France was obliged to pledge her aid to conquer, and her consent to yield Dunkirk, Mardyke and Gravelines; and Dunkirk, in t
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ants had refused to submit, and a skirmish had ensued, in which the blood of Europeans was shed for the first time on the waters of the Chesapeake; and Clayborne, defeated and banisned from Maryland as a murderer Hammond's Leah and Rachel. and an outlaw, sheltered himself in Virginia, where he had long been a member of the council. There the contest was renewed; and Harvey, Chap. VI.} far from attempting to enforce the claims of Virginia, against the royal grant, courted the favor of Baltimore. The colonists were indignant that their governor should thus, as it seemed to them, betray their interests; and as the majority of the council favored their wishes, Sir John Harvey was thrust out of his government; and Captain John West appointed to the office, till the king's pleasure be known. An assembly was summoned in May, to receive complaints against Harvey; but he had in the mean time consented to go to England, and there meet his accusers. Hening, i. 223, and 4. Oldmixon, i
Mediterranean Sea (search for this): chapter 10
strength, because they were always free; the new people at its birth was independent, and remained so; the emigrants were dismissed, not as servants but as equals. They were the natural, not the necessary, allies of the mother Chap VI} country. They spoke the same dialect, revered the same gods, cherished the same customs and laws; but they were politically independent. Freedom, stimulating exertion, invited them to stretch their settlements from the shores of the Euxine to the Western Mediterranean, and urged them forward to wealth and prosperity, commensurate with their boldness and the vast extent of their domains. The colonies of Carthage, on the contrary, had no sooner attained sufficient consideration to merit attention, than the mother state insisted upon a monopoly of their commerce. The colonial system is as old as colonies and the spirit of commercial gain and political oppression. Brougham's Colonial Policy, i. 21-23. Dionysius Halicarnassus, l. III. But of all
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