hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
New England (United States) 260 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 236 0 Browse Search
John Winthrop 190 0 Browse Search
John Smith 182 0 Browse Search
Hazard 160 0 Browse Search
Hening 138 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 134 0 Browse Search
Chalmers 128 0 Browse Search
France (France) 128 0 Browse Search
N. Y. Hist 116 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 599 total hits in 142 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Old Point Comfort (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ct as his lieutenant; and, on Friday, the Nov 22 twenty-second of November, with a small but favoring gale, Leonard Calvert, and about two hundred people, most of them Roman Catholic gentlemen and their ser- Chap. VII.} vants, in the Ark and the Dove, a ship of large burden, and a pinnace, set sail for the northern bank of the Potomac. Having staid by the way in Barbadoes and St. Christopher, it was not till February of the follow- 1634. Feb. 24. ing year, that they arrived at Point Comfort, in Virginia; where, in obedience to the express letters of King Charles, they were welcomed by Harvey with courtesy and humanity. Clayborne also appeared, but it was as a prophet of ill omen, to terrify the company by predicting the fixed hostility of the natives. Leaving Point Comfort, Calvert sailed into the Po- Mar. tomac; Winthrop, i. 134. and with the pinnace ascended the stream. A cross was planted on an island, and the country claimed for Christ and for England. At about forty
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ce. For a season, there was a divided rule; Fendall was acknowledged by the 1658 Catholic party in the city of St. Mary's; and the commissioners were sustained by the Puritans of St. Leonard's. At length, the conditions of a compromise were settled; and the government of the whole prov- Mar. 24. ince was surrendered to the agent of the proprietary. Permission to retain arms; an indemnity for arrears; relief from the oath of fealty; and a confirmation of the acts and orders of the recent Puritan assemblies;— these were the terms of the surrender, and prove the influence of the Puritans. Bacon's Preface, and 1658, c. i. McMahon, 211, and Council Proceedings, in McMahon, note to 14 Fendall was a weak and impetuous man; but I cannot find any evidence that his administration was stained by injustice. Most of the statutes enacted during his government were thought worthy of being perpetuated. The death of Cromwell left the condition of England uncertain, and might well diffuse
Newfoundland (Canada) (search for this): chapter 11
tations; he had been a member of the great company for Virginia; and, while secretary of state, he had obtained a special patent for the southern promontory of Newfoundland. How zealous he was in selecting suitable emigrants; how earnest to promote habits of domestic order and economical industry; how lavishly he expended his estate in advancing the interests of his settlement on the rugged shores of Avalon, Whitbourne's Newfoundland, in the Cambridge library. Also Purchas, IV. 1882—1891; Collier on, Calvert; Fuller's Worthies of Yorkshire, 201, 202; Wood's Athenae Oxonienses, II. 522, 523; Lloyd's State Worthies, in Biog. Brit. article Calvert; Chal evils of a common stock, he cherished enterprise by leaving each one to enjoy the results of his own industry. But numerous difficulties prevented success in Newfoundland: parliament had ever asserted the freedom of the fisheries, Chalmers, 84. 100. 114. 115. 116. 130. which his grants tended to impair; the soil and the clima
Old Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Chapter VII Colonization of Maryland. the limits of Virginia, by its second charter, ex- Chap. VII.} 1609. tended two hundred miles north of Old Point Comfort, and therefore included all the soil which subsequently formed the state of Maryland. It was not long before the country towards the head of the Chesapeake was explored; settlements in Accomack were extended; and commerce was begun with the tribes which Smith had been the first to visit. Porey, the secretary of the colony, made a discovery into the 1621. great bay, as far as the River Patuxent, which he ascended; but his voyage probably reached no farther to the north. The English settlement of a hundred men, which he is represented to have found already established, Chalmers, 206. was rather a consequence of his voyage, and seems to have been on the eastern shore, perhaps within the limits of Virginia. Purchas, IV. 1784. Smith, II. 61—64. The hope of a very good trade of furs, animated the adventurers; and i
Susquehanna (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
rnment over the companions of his voyages. Chalmers, 227, 228. Harvey enforced the commands of his sovereign, and 1632 Mar 8. confirmed the license by a colonial commission. Ibid. 228, 229. The Dutch plantations were esteemed to border upon Virginia. After long experience as a surveyor, and after years employed in discoveries, Clayborne, now acting under the royal license, formed establishments, not only on Kent Island, then within the Old Dominion, but also near the mouth of the Susquehannah. Hazard, i. 430. Relation of Maryland, 34. Thurloe, v. 486. Hazard, i. 630. Maryland Papers, in Chalmers, 233.Thus the Chap. VII.} colony of Virginia anticipated the extension of its commerce and its limits; and, as mistress of all the vast and commodious waters of the Chesapeake, and of the soil on both sides of the Potomac, indulged the hope of obtaining the most brilliant commercial success, and rising into powerful opulence, without the competition of a rival. It was the pec
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
dis- Chap. VII.} 1632. pensed with; and, at the appointment of the Baron of Baltimore, all present and future liege people of the English king, except such as shou1633 apprehension, and before any colonists had embarked under the charter of Baltimore, her commissioners had in England remonstrated against the grant as an invasitish state paper office. Under the munificence and superintending mildness of Baltimore, the dreary wilderness was soon quickened with the swarming life and activityes of a sovereign, but members of a commonwealth; and, but for the claims of Baltimore, Maryland would equally Chap VII.} enjoy the benefits of republican liberty.nsequence, Stone, Hatton and his friends, reinstated the rights of Lord 1654 Baltimore in their integrity; displacing all officers of the contrary party, they intro Chap. VII.} dissensions, of which the root had consisted in the claims that Baltimore had always asserted, and had never been able to establish. What should now b
St. George, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
rtyseven leagues above the mouth of the river, he found the village of Piscataqua, an Indian settlement nearly opposite Mount Vernon. The chieftain of the tribe would neither bid him go nor stay; he might use his own discretion. It did not seem safe for the English to plant the first settlement so high up the river; Calvert descended the stream, examining, in his barge, the creeks and estuaries nearer the Chesapeake; he entered the river which is now called St. Mary's, and which he named St. George's; and, about four leagues from its junction with the Potomac, he anchored at the Indian town of Yoacomoco. The native inhabitants, having suffered from the superior power of the Susquehannahs, who occupied the district between the bays, had already resolved to remove into places of more security in the interior; and many of them had begun to migrate before the English arrived. To Calvert, the spot seemed convenient for a plantation; it was easy by presents of cloth and axes, of hoes an
St. Christopher (Saint Kitts and Nevis) (search for this): chapter 11
some unknown reason, abandoned his purpose of conducting the emigrants in person, appointed his brother to act as his lieutenant; and, on Friday, the Nov 22 twenty-second of November, with a small but favoring gale, Leonard Calvert, and about two hundred people, most of them Roman Catholic gentlemen and their ser- Chap. VII.} vants, in the Ark and the Dove, a ship of large burden, and a pinnace, set sail for the northern bank of the Potomac. Having staid by the way in Barbadoes and St. Christopher, it was not till February of the follow- 1634. Feb. 24. ing year, that they arrived at Point Comfort, in Virginia; where, in obedience to the express letters of King Charles, they were welcomed by Harvey with courtesy and humanity. Clayborne also appeared, but it was as a prophet of ill omen, to terrify the company by predicting the fixed hostility of the natives. Leaving Point Comfort, Calvert sailed into the Po- Mar. tomac; Winthrop, i. 134. and with the pinnace ascended the
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
l the soil which subsequently formed the state of Maryland. It was not long before the country tow It is appended in English to the Relation of Maryland, 1635. It has been commented upon by Chalmerd the proprietary government to the people of Maryland; and, but for these, the patent would have beChalmers, 212. 232—235. Yet the people of Maryland were not content with vindicating the limits throughout the whole colonial legislation of Maryland, the body representing the people, in its supuld have endangered the separate existence of Maryland; yet we have seen Virginia, which had ever bethe colony could bear. Bacon, 1641—2, c. v Maryland, for all its divisions, was the abode of happealth; and, but for the claims of Baltimore, Maryland would equally Chap VII.} enjoy the benefits y goodness had been to her a fatal dowry; and Maryland was claimed by four separate aspirants. Virginia, Berkeley yielded to the public will; in Maryland, Fendall permitted the power of the people to[45 more...]<
Jamaica (Jamaica) (search for this): chapter 11
d with rivers and deep bays, united to perfect the scene of colonial felicity and contentment. Ever intent on advancing the interests of his colony, Lord Baltimore invited the Puritans of Massachusetts to emigrate to Maryland, offering them lands and privileges, and free liberty of religion; but Gibbons, to whom he had forwarded a commission, was so wholly tutored in the New England discipline, that he would not advance the wishes of the Irish peer; and the people, who subsequently refused Jamaica and Ireland, were not now tempted to desert the Bay of Massachusetts for the Chesapeake. Winthrop, II. 148, 149. But secret dangers existed. The aborigines, alarmed at the rapid increase of the Europeans, vexed at being frequently overreached by their cupidity, com- 1642 to 1644. menced hostilities; for the Indians, ignorant of the remedy of redress, always plan retaliation. After a war of frontier aggressions, marked by no decisive events, peace was reestablished on the usual ter
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...