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Charles (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
proved itself incapable of colonizing its domain, and could derive revenue only from sales of territory, disregarding a former grant of a large district on the Charles River, conveyed to Sir Henry Roswell, Sir John Young, Thomas Southcoat, John Humphrey, John Endicott, and Simon Whetcomb, a belt of land extending three miles south few miles, and on the nineteenth took back to Salem a favorable report of the land on its banks. Dudley and others who followed, preferred the country on the Charles river at Watertown. By common consent, early in the next month the removal was made, with much cost and labor, from Salem to Charlestown. But while drooping with tg his ministry received in England. In like manner the ruling elder and deacons were chosen and installed. Thus was constituted the body, which, crossing the Charles River, became known as the first church of Boston. It embodied the three great principles of congregationalism; a Chap. IX.} 1630. right faith attended by a true
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
y of the favorite 1627 Buckingham, eager to thwart the jealous Richelieu, to whom he was as far inferior in the qualities of a statesman, as he was superior in youth, manners, and Chap. IX.} personal beauty, hurried England into an unnecessary and disastrous conflict with France. The siege of Rochelle invited the presence of an English fleet; but the expedition was fatal to the honor and the objects of Buckingham. Hostilities were no where successfully attempted, except in America. Port Royal fell easily into the 1628. hands of the English; the conquest was no more than the acquisition of a small trading station. It was a bolder design to attempt the reduction of Canada. Sir David Kirk and his two brothers, Louis and Thomas, were commissioned to ascend the St. Lawrence, and Quebec received a summons to surrender. The garrison, destitute alike of provisions and of military stores, had no hope but in the character of Champlain, its commander: his answer of proud defiance conc
Dover, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Gorges' Narrative, c. XXIV. Hubbard, 614-16. Prince, 215. Adams's Annals of Portsmouth, 9, 10. Williamson's Maine, i. 222, and ff. Belknap's New Hampshire, c.;—a truly valuable work, highly creditable to American literature. Portsmouth and Dover are among the oldest towns in New England. Splendid as were the anticipations of the proprietaries, and lavish as was their enthusiasm in liberal expenditures, the immediate progress of the plantations was inconsiderable, and, even as fishing stg pestilence which left New Plymouth a desert; no notice seems to have been taken of the rights of the natives; nor did they now issue any deed of their lands; Savage on Winthrop, i. 405, and ff. but the soil in the 1630 immediate vicinity of Dover, and afterwards of Portsmouth, was conveyed to the planters themselves, or to 1631 those at whose expense the settlement had been made. Adams's Portsmouth, 17—19. A favorable impulse was thus given to the little colonies; and houses now began
Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
influence on public happiness, as any by which the human race has ever been diversified. The settlement near Weymouth was revived; a 1624. new plantation was begun near Mount Wollaston, 1625. within the present limits of Quincy; and the merchants of the West continued their voyages to the islands of New England. But these things were of feeble influence compared with the consequences of Chap IX.} 1624. the attempt at a permanent establishment near Cape Ann; for White, a minister of Dorchester, a Puritan, but not a separatist, breathed into the enterprise a higher principle than that of the desire of gain. Roger Conant, having already left New Plymouth for Nantasket, through a brother in England, who was a friend of White, obtained the agency of the adventure. 1625 A year's experience proved to the company, that their speculation must change its form, or it would produce no results; the merchants, therefore, paid with honest liberality all the persons whom they had employed, a
Salem Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
sdome, power, goodness, and truthe, than formerly wee have been acquainted with; Hee shall make us a prayse and glory, that men shall say of succeeding plantations, the Lord make it likely that of New England. After sixty one days at sea the Arbella came in sight of Mount Desert; on the tenth of June the White Hills were descried afar off; near the Isle of Shoals and Cape Ann, the sea was enlivened by the shallops of fishermen; and on the twelfth, as the ship came to anchor outside of Salem harbor, it was visited by William Pierce, of the Lyon, whose frequent voy- Chap. IX.} 1630. ages had given him experience as a pilot on the coast. Winthrop and his companions came full of hope; they found the colony in an unexpected condition of distress. Above eighty had died the winter before. Higginson himself was wasting under a hectic fever; many others were weak and sick; all the corn and bread among them was hardly a fit supply for a fortnight. The survivors of one hundred and eight
Groton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
resent government, but the corporate body and their successors, wherever they were to meet, retained the chartered right of making their own selection of the persons whom they would admit to the freedom of the company. The conditions on which the privilege should be granted would control the political character of Massachusetts. At a very full general court, convened on the twentieth of October for the choice of new officers out of those who were to join the plantation, John Winthrop, of Groton in Suffolk, of whom extraordinary great commendations had been received both for his integrity and sufficiency, as being one altogether well fitted and accomplished for the place of governor, was by erection of hands elected to that office for one year from that day; and with him were joined a deputy and assistants, of whom nearly all proposed to go over. The greatness of the business brought a necessity for a supply of money. It was resolved, that the business should be proceeded in with
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
bard, 614-16. Prince, 215. Adams's Annals of Portsmouth, 9, 10. Williamson's Maine, i. 222, and ff. Belknap's New Hampshire, c.;—a truly valuable work, highly cree transformed into regular establishments of trade. For the early history of Maine, the original authorities are in Purchas vol. IV.; the Relation of the PresideNorth America, his first act with reference to the territory of the present state of Maine was, to invite the Scottish nation to become the guardians of its frontierility of the French minister, very different causes delayed the colonization of Maine. Hardly had the little settlement, which claimed the distinction of being the Except for the wealth to be derived from the forest and the sea, the coast of Maine would not at that time have been tenanted by Englishmen; and this again was fatifty inhabitants, when the first court ever duly organized on the soil of 1636 Maine was held within its limits. Documents in Folsom, 49—52. Josselyn, 200. Befo
Wethersfield (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
to themselves. The younger Winthrop, the future benefactor of Connecticut, one of those men in whom the elements of human excellence are mingled in the happiest union, returned from England July 7. with a commission from the proprietaries of that region, to erect a fort at the mouth of the stream—a Oct. 8. purpose which was accomplished. Yet, before his arrival in Massachusetts Bay, settlements had been commenced, by emigrants from the environs of Boston, at Hartford, and Windsor, and Wethersfield; and in the last days of the pleasantest of the autumnal months, a Oct. 15, O. S. company of sixty pilgrims, women and children being of the number, began their march to the west. Never before had the forests of America witnessed such a scene. But the journey was begun too late in the season: the winter was so unusually early and severe, Nov 15 that provisions could not arrive by way of the river; Trumbull's Connecticut, i. App. No. i imperfect shelter had been provided; cattle peri
Quincy (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
istory of a class of men as remarkable for their qualities and their influence on public happiness, as any by which the human race has ever been diversified. The settlement near Weymouth was revived; a 1624. new plantation was begun near Mount Wollaston, 1625. within the present limits of Quincy; and the merchants of the West continued their voyages to the islands of New England. But these things were of feeble influence compared with the consequences of Chap IX.} 1624. the attempt at aprelatist. At Nantasket and further south, stragglers lingered near the sea side, attracted by the gains of a fishing station and a petty trade in beaver. The Puritan ruler visited in person the remains of Morton's unruly company in what is now Quincy, rebuked them for their profane revels, and admonished them, to look there should be better walking. After the departure of the emigrant ship from England, the company, counselled by White, an eminent lawyer, and supported by the time-serving
Connecticut River (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
rriors; the whole number of the effective men of the emigrants was much less than two hundred. The danger was incessant; and while the settlers, with hardly a plough or a yoke of oxen, turned the wild fertility of nature into productiveness, they were at the same time exposed to the incursions of a savage enemy, whose delight was carnage. For the Pequods had already shown a hostile spirit. 1633 Several years had elapsed since they had murdered the clew of a small trading vessel in Connecticut River. W th some appearance of justice they pleaded the necessity of self-defence, and sent messengers to Boston 1634 Nov to desire the alliance of the white men. The government of Massachusetts accepted the excuse, and im- Chap. IX.} mediately conferred the benefit which was due from civilization to the ignorant and passionate tribes; it reconciled the Pequods with their hereditary enemies, the Narragansetts. No longer at variance with a powerful neighbor, the Pequods again displayed t
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