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Gold (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
I. part i. and II. Early in the spring of the following year, the wan- 540. Mar. 3. derers renewed their march, with an Indian guide, who promised to lead the way to a country, governed, it was said, by a woman, and where gold so abounded, that the art of melting and refining it was understood. He described the process so well, that the credulous Spaniards took heart, and exclaimed, He must have seen it, or the devil has been his teacher! The Indian appears to have pointed towards the Gold Region of North Carolina. Siliman's Journal, XXIII. 8, 9. The adventurers, therefore, eagerly hastened to the north-east; they passed the Alatamaha; they admired the fertile valleys of Georgia, rich, productive, and full of good rivers. They passed a northern tributary of the Alatamaha, and a southern branch of the Ogechee; and, at length, came upon the Ogechee itself, which, in April, flowed with a full April. channel and a strong current. Much of the time, the Spaniards were in wild s
Combahee (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
in 1523, lost fortune and life ingloriously in a dispute with Cortes for the government of the country on the river Panuco. A voyage for slaves brought the Spaniards in 1520. 1520 still further to the north. A company of seven, of whom the most distinguished was Lucas Vasquez de Ayllon, fitted out two slave ships from St. Domingo, in quest of laborers for their plantations and mines. From the Bahama Islands, they passed to the coast of South Carolina, which was called Chicora. The Combahee River received the name of the Jordan; the name of St. Helena, given to a cape, now belongs to the sound. The natives of this region had not yet learned to fear Europeans; and they fled at their approach, more from timid wonder than from a sense of peril. Gifts were interchanged, and the strangers received with confidence and hospitality. When at length the natives returned the visit of their guests, and covered the decks with cheerful throngs, the ships were got under way and steered for S
Peru (Peru) (search for this): chapter 6
of his officers, returned to New Spain. His failure to find a Northern Peru threw him out of favor; yet what could have more deserved appla The assertion was received even by those who had seen Mexico and Peru. To no one was this faith more disastrous than to Ferdinand de Sotose of freedom. Perceiving the angry jealousies of the conquerors of Peru, Soto had seasonably withdrawn, to display his opulence in Spain, anlged How brilliant must be the prospect, since even the conqueror of Peru was willing to hazard his fortune and the greatness of his name! Ad equipments the famous expeditions against the empires of Mexico and Peru. Every thing was provided that experience in former invasions and ty added, afforded them shelter through the winter. Yet no mines of Peru were discovered; no ornaments of gold Chap. II.} 1541. adorned the his pride. Should he, who had promised greater booty than Mexico or Peru had yielded, now return as a defeated fugitive, so naked that his tr
Pacific Ocean (search for this): chapter 6
, ed. 1665. The design of Cortes remained but the offer of loyalty. A voyage to the north-west was really under- 1525 taken by Stephen Gomez, an experienced naval officer, who had been with Magellan in the first memorable passage into the Pacific Ocean. The expedition was decreed by the council for the Indies, in the hope of discovering the northern route to India, which, notwithstanding it had been sought for in vain, was yet universally believed to exist. His ship entered the bays of Neful courage against hunger, want of water on the plains, cold and weariness, perils from beasts and perils from red men, the voyagers went from town to town in New Mexico, westward and still to the west, till in May, 1536, they drew near the Pacific Ocean at Chap. II.} 1536. the village of San Miguel in Sonora. From that place they were escorted by Spanish soldiers to Compostella; and all the way to the city of Mexico, they were entertained as public guests. In 1530 an Indian slave had to
Cape Saint John (Canada) (search for this): chapter 6
ears 1528 and 1540, discovered the Chesapeake, and made it known as the Bay of St. Mary. Under that appellation the historian Oviedo, writing a little after 1540, describes it as opening to the sea in the latitude of thirty-six degrees and forty minutes, and as including islands; of two rivers which it receives, he calls the northeastern one, Salt River; the other, the river of the Holy Ghost; the cape to the north of it, which he places in the latitude of thirty-seven degrees, he names Cape St. John. Oviedo: Hist. Gen. L. XXI. c. IX., ed. 1852, II. 146. The bay of St. Mary is marked on all Spanish maps, after the year 1549. J. G. Kohl. But as yet not a Spanish fort was erected on the Atlantic coast, not a harbor was occupied, not one settlement was begun. The first permanent establishment of the Spaniards in Florida was the result of jealous bigotry. For France had begun to settle the region with a Chap. II.} 1562 colony of Protestants; and Calvinism, which, with the sp
Nova Scotia (Canada) (search for this): chapter 6
Chapter 2: Spaniards in the United States. I have traced the progress of events, which, for a Chap. II.} season, gave to France the uncertain possession of Acadia and Canada. The same nation laid claim to large and undefined regions at the southern extremity of our republic. The expedition of Francis I. discovered the continent in a latitude south of the coast which Cabot had explored; but Verrazzani had yet been anticipated. The claim to Florida, on the ground of discovery, belonged to the Spanish, and was successfully asserted. Extraordinary success had kindled in the Spanish nation an equally extraordinary enthusiasm. No sooner had the New World revealed itself to their enterprise, than the valiant men, who had won laurels under Ferdinand among the mountains of Andalusia, sought a new career of glory in more remote adventures. The weapons that had been tried in the battles with the Moors, and the military skill that had been acquired in the romantic conquest of Gra
Tampico (Tamaulipas, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 6
vers, inhabitants, and every thing else that seemed worthy of remark; and especially noticing the vast volume of wafer brought down by one very large river, till at last they came upon the track of Cortes near Vera Cruz. Between that harbor and Tampico they set up a pillar as the landmark of the discoveries of Garay. More than eight months were employed in thus exploring three hundred leagues of the coast, and taking possession Chap. II.} 1519. of the country for the crown of Castile. The e name of the Espiritu Santo. The account of the expedition having been laid before Charles the Fifth, a royal edict in 1521, granted to Garay the privilege of colonizing at his own cost the region which he had made known, from a point south of Tampico to the limit of Ponce de Leon, near the coast of Alabama. But Garay thought not of the Mississippi and its valley: he coveted access to the wealth of Mexico; and, in 1523, lost fortune and life ingloriously in a dispute with Cortes for the gove
Granada (Spain) (search for this): chapter 6
s under Ferdinand among the mountains of Andalusia, sought a new career of glory in more remote adventures. The weapons that had been tried in the battles with the Moors, and the military skill that had been acquired in the romantic conquest of Granada, were now turned against the feeble occupants of America. The passions of avarice and religious zeal were strangely blended; and the heroes of Spain sailed to the west, as it they had been bound on a new crusade, where infinite wealth was to ree indulged, that the laws of nature themselves would yield to the desires of men so fortunate and so brave? Juan Ponce de Leon was the discoverer of Florida 1512 His youth had been passed in military service in Spain: and, during the wars in Granada, he had shared in the wild exploits of predatory valor. No sooner had the return of the first voyage across the Atlantic given an assurance of a New World, than he hastened to participate in the dangers and the fruits of adventure in America.
Seville (Spain) (search for this): chapter 6
g that a massive block, which from the summit seemed no taller than a man, was higher than the tower of the cathedral at Seville. In no other part of the continent has there been found so deep a gulf, hollowed out by a river for its channel, where le of noble birth and good estates. Houses and vineyards, lands for tillage, and rows of olive-trees in the Ajarrafe of Seville, were sold, as in the times of the crusades, to obtain the means of military equipments. The port of 1538. San Lucar oissippi, he came upon the country of Nilco, which was well peopled. The river was there larger than the Guadalquivir at Seville. At last, he arrived at the April 17. province where the Washita, already united with the Red River, enters the Missis winds and the certain perils of the proposed colonization, they turned about before coming near the bay, and sailed for Seville, spreading the worst accounts of a country which none of them had seen. Melendez returned to Spain, impoverished, but
Bahama Islands (search for this): chapter 6
ght not of the Mississippi and its valley: he coveted access to the wealth of Mexico; and, in 1523, lost fortune and life ingloriously in a dispute with Cortes for the government of the country on the river Panuco. A voyage for slaves brought the Spaniards in 1520. 1520 still further to the north. A company of seven, of whom the most distinguished was Lucas Vasquez de Ayllon, fitted out two slave ships from St. Domingo, in quest of laborers for their plantations and mines. From the Bahama Islands, they passed to the coast of South Carolina, which was called Chicora. The Combahee River received the name of the Jordan; the name of St. Helena, given to a cape, now belongs to the sound. The natives of this region had not yet learned to fear Europeans; and they fled at their approach, more from timid wonder than from a sense of peril. Gifts were interchanged, and the strangers received with confidence and hospitality. When at length the natives returned the visit of their guests,
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