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Elizabeth City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ought of together. A stone, which had been brought from the frozen regions, was pronounced by the refiners of London to contain gold. The news excited the wakeful avarice of the city: there were not wanting those who endeavored to purchase of Elizabeth a lease of the new lands, of which the loose minerals were so full of the precious metal. A fleet was immediately fitted out, to procure more of the gold, rather than to make any further research for the passage into the Pacific; and Chap. Inow called No May 24. Man's land, and afterwards passed round the promontory of Gay Head, naming it Dover Cliff. At length they entered Buzzard's Bay—a stately sound, which they called Gosnold's Hope. The westernmost of the islands was named Elizabeth, from the queen—a name which has been transferred to the whole group. Here they beheld the rank vegetation of a virgin soil; the noble forests; the wild fruits and the flowers, bursting from the earth; the eglantine, the thorn, and the honeysu
Southampton (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 7
, 1606. repeated his voyage, and made a more accurate survey of Maine. Enterprises for discovery were now continuous. Bartholomew Gilbert, Purchas, IV. 1656—1658. returning from the West Indies, made an unavailing search for the colony of Raleigh. It was the last attempt to trace the remains of those unfortunate men. But as the testimony of Pring had confirmed the reports of Gosnold, the career of navigation was vigorously pursued. An expedition, pro- 1605. moted by the Earl of Southampton and Lord Arundel, of Wardour, and commanded by George Weymouth, who, in attempting a north-west passage, had already explored the coast of Labrador, now discovered the Penobscot River. Weymouth left England in March, and, in about six weeks, came in sight of the American continent near Cape Cod. Turning to the north, he approached the coast of Maine, and ascended the western branch of the Penobscot beyond Belfast Bay; where the deep channel of the broad stream, the abundance of its spac
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
2. May 14. far to the north of Nahant. Belknap's Biog II. 103. Williamson's Maine, i. 184, 185. He failed to observe a good harbor, and, standing for the south, l. It reached the American coast among the islands which skirt the harbors of Maine. The mouth Chap. III.} of the Penobscot offered good anchorage and fishing Pr danger. Purchas, IV. 1654—1656. Compare Belknap, II. 123—133; Williamson's Maine, i. p. 185—187. Pring, a few years later, 1606. repeated his voyage, and made a more accurate survey of Maine. Enterprises for discovery were now continuous. Bartholomew Gilbert, Purchas, IV. 1656—1658. returning from the West Indies, mican continent near Cape Cod. Turning to the north, he approached the coast of Maine, and ascended the western branch of the Penobscot beyond Belfast Bay; where theBrief Narration, c. II. Compare Belknap's Am. Biog. II. 134—150; Williamson's Maine, i. 191—195. Strange with what reckless confidence Oldmixon, i. 219, 220,
Manteo (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ay in America, they arrived in September in the west of England, accompanied by Manteo and Wanchese, two natives of the wilderness; and the returning voyagers gave su of this colony was destined to be influenced by the character of the natives. Manteo, the friend of the English, and who returned with the fleet from a visit to Enge jealousy, and murdered one of the assistants. The mother and the kindred of Manteo Chap III.} 1587 welcomed the English to the Island of Croatan; and a mutual frians. The vanities of life were not forgotten in the New Aug 13. World; and Manteo, the faithful Indian chief, by the commandment of Sir Walter Raleigh, received cke and Shaftesbury suggested the establishment of palatinates in Carolina, and Manteo shared his honors with the admired philosopher of his age. As the time for tor had they escaped with their lives to Croatan, and, through the friendship of Manteo, become familiar with the Indians? The conjecture has been hazarded, Lawson
ow advised to attempt a passage by the northeast, and was made president of the company of merchants who undertook the enterprise. In May, 1553, the fleet of three ships, under the command of Sir Hugh Willoughby, following the instructions of Cabot, now almost an octogenarian, dropped down the Thames with the intent to reach China by doubling the northern promontory of Norway. The admiral, separated from his companions in a storm, was driven by the cold in September to seek shelter in a Lapland harbor. When search was made for him in the following spring, his whole company had perished from cold; Willoughby himself, whose papers showed that he had survived till January, was found dead in his cabin. Richard Chancellor, in one of the other ships, reached the harbor of Archangel. This was the discovery of Russia, Chap. III.} 1554 and the commencement of maritime commerce with that empire. A Spanish writer calls the result of the voyage a discovery of new Indies. Hakluyt, i.
Fayal (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 7
help in its attempts to trace the fate of the colony of Roanoke. The name of Raleigh stands highest among the statesmen of England, who advanced the colonization of the United States; and his fame belongs to American history. No Englishman of his age possessed so various or so extraordinary qualities. Courage which was never daunted, mild self-possession, and fertility of invention, insured him glory in his profession of arms; and his services in the conquest of Cadiz, or the capture of Fayal, were alone sufficient to establish his fame as a gallant and successful commander. In every danger, his life was distinguished by valor, and his death was ennobled by true magnanimity. He was not only admirable in active life as a sol- Chap III} dier; he was an accomplished scholar. No statesman in retirement ever expressed the charms of tranquil leisure more beautifully than Raleigh; and it was not entirely with the language of grateful friendship, that Spenser described his sweet ve
France (France) (search for this): chapter 7
eft the university of Oxford, to take part in the civil contests between the 1569 to 1575 Huguenots and the Catholics in France, and with the prince of Navarre, afterwards Henry IV., was learning the art of war under the veteran Coligny. The Protes the pope, which gave to Spain a paramount title to the North American world; and as a prince he sought a counterpoise to France in an intimate Spanish alliance, which he hoped to confirm by the successive marriage of one of his sons after the other its settlements in the New World. Already four hundred vessels came annually from the harbors of Portugal and Spain, of France and England, to the shores of Newfoundland. The English were not there in such numbers as other nations, for they still was determined to secure to England those delightful countries Chap. III.} 1584. Mar. 25. from which the Protestants of France had been expelled. Having presented a memorial, he readily obtained from Elizabeth a paten Hakluyt, III. 297—301. Ha
Edgartown Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
mong the islands which skirt the harbors of Maine. The mouth Chap. III.} of the Penobscot offered good anchorage and fishing Pring made a discovery of the eastern rivers and harbors—the Saco, the Kennebunk, and the York; and the channel of the Piscataqua was examined for three or four leagues. Meeting no sassafras, he steered for the south; doubled Cape Ann; and went on shore in Massachusetts; but, being still unsuccessful, he again pursued a southerly track, and finally anchored in Old Town harbor, on Martha's Vineyard. The whole absence lasted about six months, and was completed without disaster or danger. Purchas, IV. 1654—1656. Compare Belknap, II. 123—133; Williamson's Maine, i. p. 185—187. Pring, a few years later, 1606. repeated his voyage, and made a more accurate survey of Maine. Enterprises for discovery were now continuous. Bartholomew Gilbert, Purchas, IV. 1656—1658. returning from the West Indies, made an unavailing search for the colony of Raleigh. I
Penobscot (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
rom the West Indies, made an unavailing search for the colony of Raleigh. It was the last attempt to trace the remains of those unfortunate men. But as the testimony of Pring had confirmed the reports of Gosnold, the career of navigation was vigorously pursued. An expedition, pro- 1605. moted by the Earl of Southampton and Lord Arundel, of Wardour, and commanded by George Weymouth, who, in attempting a north-west passage, had already explored the coast of Labrador, now discovered the Penobscot River. Weymouth left England in March, and, in about six weeks, came in sight of the American continent near Cape Cod. Turning to the north, he approached the coast of Maine, and ascended the western branch of the Penobscot beyond Belfast Bay; where the deep channel of the broad stream, the abundance of its spacious harbors, the neighboring springs and copious rivulets, compelled the experienced Chap III.} 1605 mariner to admire the noble river, which is just now beginning to have upon it
Columbia River (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
t the tropics. Despairing of success, he retired to a harbor in a milder latitude, within the limits of Mexico; and, having refitted his ship, and named the country New Albion, he sailed for England, through the seas of Asia. Thus was the southern part of the Oregon territory first visited by Englishmen, yet not till after a voyage of the Spanish from Acapulco, commanded by 1542. Cabrillo, a Portuguese, had traced the American continent to within two and a half degrees of the mouth of Columbia River; Forster's Northern Voyages, III. c. IV. s. II. Humboldt, Nouv Esp. II. 436, 437. Compare Viage de las Goletas Sutil y Mexicana, 34. 36. 57. while, thirteen years after the 1593 voyage of Drake, John de Fuca, a mariner from the Chap. III.} 1593 Isles of Greece, then in the employ of the viceroy of Mexico, sailed into the bay which is now known as the Gulf of Georgia, and, having for twenty days steered through its intricate windings and numerous islands, returned with a belief,
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