hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
New England (United States) 260 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 236 0 Browse Search
John Winthrop 190 0 Browse Search
John Smith 182 0 Browse Search
Hazard 160 0 Browse Search
Hening 138 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 134 0 Browse Search
Chalmers 128 0 Browse Search
France (France) 128 0 Browse Search
N. Y. Hist 116 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 519 total hits in 155 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Southampton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
o Almighty God and to those from whom it had issued, in the names of the burgesses and of the whole colony whom they represented; the more so, as they were promised the power to allow or disallow the orders of court of the London company. A perpetual interest attaches to this first elective body that ever assembled in the Western world, representing the people of Virginia, and making laws for their government, more than a year before the Mayflower, with the Pilgrims, left the harbor of Southampton, and while Virginia was still the only British colony on the continent of America. The functions of government were in some degree confounded; but the record of the proceedings justifies the opinion of Sir Edwin Sandys, that the laws were very well and judiciously formed. The enactments of these earliest American lawgivers were instantly put in force, without waiting for their ratification by the company in England. Former griefs were buried in oblivion, and they who had been depende
Cape Charles (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
colonists. Newport, who commanded the ships, was acquainted with the old passage, and, consuming the whole of the early spring in a navigation which should have been completed in February, sailed by way of the Canaries and the West India Islands. As he turned to the north, a severe storm carried his fleet beyond the settlement of Raleigh, into the magnificent Bay of the Chesapeake. Smith, i. 150. Stith, 44. The head-lands received and retain April 26. the names of Cape Henry and Cape Charles, from the sons of King James; the deep water for anchorage, putting the emigrants in good Comfort, gave a name to the Northern Point; and within the capes a country opened, which appeared to the emigrants to claim Chap IV.} 1607 the prerogative over the most pleasant places in the world. Hope revived for a season, as they advanced. Heaven and earth seemed never to have agreed better to frame a place for man's commodious and delightful habitation. Smith, i. 114. Stith, 45. A noble
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 8
. Contrary to her commands, he was there subjected to the harshest usage among half-savage serfs. Rising against his taskmaster, whom he slew in the struggle, he mounted a horse, and through forest paths escaped from thraldom to the confines of Russia. Again the hand of woman relieved his wants; he travelled across the country to Transylvania, and, there bidding farewell to his companions in arms, he resolved to return to his own sweet country. But, as he crossed the continent, he heard the far as he could advance in boats, but struck into the in- Chap. IV.} 1607-8 terior. His companions disobeyed his instructions, and, being surprised by the Indians, were put to death. Smith himself, who, in the plains of the Crimea and of Southern Russia, had become acquainted with the superstitions and the manners of wandering tribes, did not beg for life, but preserved it by the calmness of self-possession. Displaying a pocket compass, he amused the savages by an explanation of its powers
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
in for some years Chap. IV.} 1608. longer the fabled dwelling-place of a giant progeny. Burk, i. 123. He was the first to make known to the English the fame of the Mohawks, who dwelt upon a great water, and had many boats, and many men, and, as it seemed to the feebler Algonquin tribes, made war upon all the world; in the Chesapeake Bay he encountered a little fleet of their canoes. Smith, i. 181—183. The Patapsco was discovered and explored, and Smith probably entered the harbor of Baltimore. Stith, 64. The majestic Potomac, which at its mouth is seven miles broad, especially invited curiosity; and passing beyond the heights of Vernon and the city of Washington, he ascended to the falls above Georgetown. Compare Smith, i. 177, with Stith, 65, and Smith's map. Nor did he merely explore the rivers and inlets. He penetrated the territories, established friendly relations with the native tribes, and laid the foundation for future beneficial intercourse. The ma In the Ri
Gloucester county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ry of his character and his designs. It was evident that he was a being of a higher order: was his nature beneficent, or was he to be dreaded as a dangerous enemy? Their minds were bewildered, as they beheld his calm fearlessness; and they sedulously observed towards him the utmost reverence and hospitality, as if to propitiate his power, should he be rescued from their hands. The decision of his fate was referred to Pow- Chap IV} 1607-8 hatan, who was then residing in what is now Gloucester county, on York River, at a village to which Smith was conducted through the regions, now so celebrated, where the youthful Lafayette hovered upon the skirts of Cornwallis, and the arms of France and the Confederacy were united to achieve the crowning victory of American independence. The passion of vanity rules in forests as well as in cities; the grim warriors, as they met in council, displayed their gayest apparel before the Englishman, whose doom they had assembled to pronounce. The fea
Wallachia (Romania) (search for this): chapter 8
glish cavalier distinguished himself by the bravest leats of arms, in the sight of Christians and infidels, engaging fearlessly and always successfully in the single Chap. IV.} combat with the Turks, which, from the days of the crusades, had been warranted by the rules of chivalry. His signal prowess gained for him the favor of Sigismund Bathori, the unfortunate prince of Transylvania. At length he, with many others, was overpowered in 1602 Nov 18. A sudden skirmish among the glens of Wallachia, and was left severely wounded in the field of battle. A prisoner of war, he was now, according to the Eastern custom, offered for sale like a beast in a marketplace, and was sent to Constantinople as a slave. A Turkish lady had compassion on his misfortunes and his youth, and, designing to restore him to freedom, removed him to a fortress in the Crimea. Contrary to her commands, he was there subjected to the harshest usage among half-savage serfs. Rising against his taskmaster, whom h
Hampshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 8
eputy, who was both self-willed and avaricious, might be complete, he was further invested with the place of admiral of the country and the adjoining seas. Stith, 145. The return of Lord Delaware to America might Chap. IV} 1617. have restored tranquillity; the health of that nobleman was not equal to the voyage; he embarked with many emigrants, but did not live to reach Virginia. Stith, 148. In Royal and Noble Authors, II. 180—183, Lord Delaware is said to have died at Wher-well, Hants, June 7, 1618. The writers on Virginia uniformly relate that he died at sea. Smith II. 34. The tyranny of Argall was, therefore, left unrestrained; but his indiscriminate rapacity and vices were destined to defeat themselves, and procure for the colony an inestimable benefit; for they led him to defraud the company, as well as to oppress the colonists. The condition of Virginia became intolerable; the labor of 1618 the settlers was perverted to the benefit of the governor; servitude, for
Hungary (Hungary) (search for this): chapter 8
In boyhood he had sighed for the opportunity of setting out on brave adventures; and though not yet thirty years of age, he was already a veteran in the service of humanity and of Christendom. His early life had been given to the cause of freedom in the Low Countries, where he had fought for the independence of the Batavian Republic. Again, as a traveller, he had roamed over France; had visited the shores of Egypt; had returned to Italy; and, panting for glory, had sought the borders of Hungary, where there had long existed an hereditary warfare with the followers of Mahomet. It was there that the young English cavalier distinguished himself by the bravest leats of arms, in the sight of Christians and infidels, engaging fearlessly and always successfully in the single Chap. IV.} combat with the Turks, which, from the days of the crusades, had been warranted by the rules of chivalry. His signal prowess gained for him the favor of Sigismund Bathori, the unfortunate prince of Tra
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
f their tribes preserved the memory. He was allowed to send a letter to the fort at Jamestown; and the savage wonder was increased; for he seemed, by some magic, to endow the paper with the gift of intelligence. The curiosity of all the clans of the neighborhood was awakened by the prisoner; he was conducted in triumph from the settlements on the Chickahominy to the Indian villages on the Rappahannock and the Potomac; and thence, through other towns, to the residence of Opechancanough, at Pamunkey. There, for the space of three days, they practised incantations and ceremonies, in the hope of obtaining some insight into the mystery of his character and his designs. It was evident that he was a being of a higher order: was his nature beneficent, or was he to be dreaded as a dangerous enemy? Their minds were bewildered, as they beheld his calm fearlessness; and they sedulously observed towards him the utmost reverence and hospitality, as if to propitiate his power, should he be rescu
France (France) (search for this): chapter 8
dy a veteran in the service of humanity and of Christendom. His early life had been given to the cause of freedom in the Low Countries, where he had fought for the independence of the Batavian Republic. Again, as a traveller, he had roamed over France; had visited the shores of Egypt; had returned to Italy; and, panting for glory, had sought the borders of Hungary, where there had long existed an hereditary warfare with the followers of Mahomet. It was there that the young English cavalier di-8 hatan, who was then residing in what is now Gloucester county, on York River, at a village to which Smith was conducted through the regions, now so celebrated, where the youthful Lafayette hovered upon the skirts of Cornwallis, and the arms of France and the Confederacy were united to achieve the crowning victory of American independence. The passion of vanity rules in forests as well as in cities; the grim warriors, as they met in council, displayed their gayest apparel before the Englishma
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...