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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Rossbach (Saxony-Anhalt, Germany) (search for this): chapter 13
Chapter 13: Conquest of the valley of the West.—William Pitt's ministry continued. 1757-1758. the Protestant nations compared Frederic to chap. XIII.} 1757. Gustavus Adolphus, as the defender of the Reformation and of freedom. With a vigor of hope like his own, Pitt, who, eight days before the battle of Rossbach, had authorized Frederic to place Ferdinand of Brunswick at the head of the English army on the continent, planned the conquest of the colonies of France. Consulted through the under secretaries, Franklin gave full advice on the conduct of the American war, criticised the measures proposed by others, and recommended and enforced the conquest of Canada. In the House of Commons, Lord George Sackville, a man perplexed in action and without sagacity in council, of unsound judgment yet questioning every judgment but his own, restless and opinionated, made the apology of Loudoun. Nothing is done, nothing attempted, said Pitt with vehement asperity. We have lost a
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 13
the conduct of the American war, criticised the measures proposed by others, and recommended and enforced the conquest of Canada. In the House of Commons, Lord George Sackville, a man perplexed in action and without sagacity in council, of unsoundd Rigby, the colonies were unsuspicious. The genius of Pitt and his respect for their rights, the prospect of conquering Canada and the West, and unbounded anticipations of future greatness, roused their most active zeal. In some of them, especiallr sooner or later it must fall; such are the numbers of the English, such the difficulty of our receiving supplies. The Canadian war-parties were on the alert; in March a body of Iroquois and other Indians waylaid a detachment of about two hundred rfrom censure, maligned the Americans, and afterwards assisted in parliament to tax the witnesses of his pusillanimity. Canada was exhausted. Peace, peace, was the cry; no matter with what boundaries. I have not chap XIII.} 1758. lost courage,
Kingston (Canada) (search for this): chapter 13
rombie was commander-in-chief; but the general confidence rested solely on Howe. Early in the spring, Bradstreet, of New York, had proposed an attempt upon Fort Frontenac; Lord Howe overruled objections; and the gallant provincial was to undertake it, as soon as the army should have established itself on the north side of the l to be exchanged in the autumn. Better success awaited Bradstreet. From the majority in a council of war, he extorted a reluctant leave to proceed against Fort Frontenac. At the Oneida carrying-place, Brigadier Stanwix placed under his command twenty-seven hundred men, all Americans, more than eleven hundred of them New Yorkelands as fertile, rich and luxuriant as any in the universe. Crossing Lake Ontario in open boats, they landed, on the twentyfifth of August, within a mile of Fort Frontenac. It was a quadrangle, mounted with thirty pieces of cannon and sixteen small mortars. On the second day, such of the garrison as had not fled surrendered.
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
eir instructions for a common fund, and their menaces of taxation .by parliament, invited the New England colonies, and New York, and New Jersey, each without limit, to raise as many men as possible,cipations of future greatness, roused their most active zeal. In some of them, especially in New England, their contributions exceeded a just estimate of their ability. The thrifty people of Massacimself a member of parliament, was honored by a unanimous tribute from the House of Commons. New England, too, triumphed; for the praises chap. XIII.} 1758. awarded to Amherst and Wolfe recalled th safe occasion for interposition. Meantime nine thousand and twenty-four provincials, from New England, New York, and New Jersey, assembled on the shore of Lake George. There were the six hundred New England rangers, dressed like woodmen; armed with a firelock and a hatchet; under their right arm a powder-horn; a leather bag for bullets at their waist; and to each officer a pocket compass as
North America (search for this): chapter 13
s the cry; no matter with what boundaries. I have not chap XIII.} 1758. lost courage, wrote Montcalm, nor have my troops; we are resolved to find our graves under the ruins of the colony. Pitt, who had carefully studied the geography of North America, knew that the success of Bradstreet had gained the dominion of Lake Ontario and opened the avenue to Niagara; and he turned his mind from the defeat at Ticonderoga, to see if the banner of England was already waving over Fort Duquesne. For secured; the civilization of liberty and commerce and religion was henceforth to maintain the undisputed possession of the Ohio. These dreary deserts, wrote Forbes, will soon be the richest and most fertile of any possessed by the British in North America. On the twenty-eighth, a numerous detachment went to Braddock's field, where their slaughtered comrades, after more than three years, lay yet unburied in the forest. Here and there a skeleton was found resting on the trunk of a fallen tre
Bushy Run (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
rs while under the particular directions of the man they knew and loved. Every encampment was so planned as to hasten the issue. On the thirteenth the veteran Armstrong, who had proved his superior skill in leading troops rapidly and secretly through the wilderness, pushed forward with one chap. XIII.} 1758. thousand men, and in five days threw up defences within seventeen miles of Fort Duquesne. On the fifteenth, Washington, who followed, was on Chestnut Ridge; on the seventeenth, at Bushy Run. All, he reported, are in fine spirits and anxious to go on. On the nineteenth, Washington left Armstrong to wait for the Highlanders, and, taking the lead, dispelled by his vigilance every apprehension of the enemy's approach. When on the twenty-fourth, the general encamped his whole party among the hills of Turkey Creek within ten miles of Fort Duquesne, the disheartened garrison, then about five hundred in number, set fire to the fort in the night time, and by the light of its flames
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ut limit, to raise as many men as possible, believing them well able to furnish at least twenty thousand, for the expedition against Montreal and Quebec, while Pennsylvania and the southern colonies were to aid in conquering the West. He assumed that England should provide arms, ammunition and tents; he expected and required noth 1758. command as brigadier saw twelve hundred and fifty Highlanders arrive from South Carolina. They were joined by three hundred and fifty Royal Americans. Pennsylvania, animated by an unusual military spirit which seized even Benjamin West, known afterwards as a painter, and Anthony Wayne then a boy of thirteen, raised for thar as Raystown. See how our time has been misspent, cried Washington, angry at delay, and obstinately opposed to the opening the new route which Armstrong, of Pennsylvania, as obstinately advocated. But Forbes preserved a clear head and a firm will, or as he himself expressed it, was actuated by the spirits of William Pitt; and
Boscawen, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
lfe. Of the French ships in the port, three were burned on the twenty-first of July; in the night following the twenty-fifth, the boats of the squadron, with small loss, set fire to the Prudent, a seventy-four, and carried off the Bienfaisant. Boscawen was prepared to send six English ships into the harbor. But the town of Louisburg was already a heap of ruins; for eight days, the French officers and men had had no safe place for rest; of their fifty-two cannon, forty were disabled. They hadso much treasure was lavished to fortify, so much heroism to conquer. Wolfe, whose heart was in England, bore home the love and esteem of the army. The trophies were deposited with pomp in the cathedral of St. Paul's; the churches gave thanks; Boscawen, himself a member of parliament, was honored by a unanimous tribute from the House of Commons. New England, too, triumphed; for the praises chap. XIII.} 1758. awarded to Amherst and Wolfe recalled the deeds of her own sons. On the surrender
Iroquois, Wyoming (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ho had not enjoyed repose enough to fill their garners by cultivating their lands, were cut off from regular intercourse with France. I shudder, said Montcalm, in February, 1758, when I think of provisions. The famine is very great. For all our success, thus he appealed to the minister, New France needs peace, or sooner or later it must fall; such are the numbers of the English, such the difficulty of our receiving supplies. The Canadian war-parties were on the alert; in March a body of Iroquois and other Indians waylaid a detachment of about two hundred rangers in the forests near Fort Carillon, as the French called Ticonderoga, and brought back one hundred and forty-six scalps, with three prisoners, as living messages. But what availed such small successes? In the general dearth, the soldiers could receive but a half-pound of bread daily; the inhabitants of Quebec but two ounces daily. Words could not describe the misery of the people. The whole country was almost bare of veg
Fontenoy (France) (search for this): chapter 13
own Point, Abercrombie, a friend of Bute, was commander-in-chief, though Pitt selected the young Lord Howe to be the soul of the enterprise. None of the officers won favor like Howe and Wolfe. To high rank and great connections Howe added manliness, humanity, a capacity to discern merit, and judgment to employ it. As he reached America, he adopted the austere simplicity befitting forest warfare. Wolfe, then thirty-one years old, had been eighteen years in the army; was at Dettingen and Fontenoy, and won laurels at Laffeldt. Merit made him at two-and-twenty a lieutenant-colonel, and his active genius improved the discipline of his battalion. He was at once authoritative and humane, severe yet indefatigably kind; modest, but aspiring and conscious of ability. The brave soldier dutifully loved and obeyed his widowed mother, and his gentle nature saw visions of happiness in scenes of domestic love, even while he kindled at the prospect of glory, as gunpowder at fire. On the twen
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