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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Shawanese Indians (search for this): chapter 5
in a night as dark as can be conceived, with but forty men, marching in single file along a most narrow trace, Washington made his way to the camp of the Half-King. After council, it was agreed to go hand in hand, and strike the invaders. Two Indians, following the trail of the French, discovered their lodgment, away from the path, concealed among rocks. With the Mingo chiefs Washington made arrangements to come upon them by surprise. Perceiving the English approach, they ran to seize thei had done nothing to make it tenable. The little intrenchment was in a glade between two eminences covered with trees, except within sixty yards chap. V.} 1754. of it. On the third day of July, about noon, six hundred French, with one hundred Indians, came Journal of De Villiers in New York Paris Documents. Varin to Bigot, 24 July, 1754. Correspondence of H. Sharpe. in eight, and took possession of one of the eminences, where every soldier found a large tree for his shelter, and could f
th, of New York, and Franklin, the most benignant of statesmen, were deputed to prepare a constitution for a perpetual confederacy of the continent; but Franklin had already projected a plan, and had brought the heads of it with him. Hutchinson's History of Massachusetts, III. 21. The representatives of the Six Nations assembled tardily, but urged union and action. They accepted the tokens of peace. They agreed to look upon Virginia and Carolina as also present. We thank you, said Hendrick, the great Mohawk chief, we thank you for renewing and brightening the covenant chain. We will take this belt to Onondaga, where our council-fire always burns, and keep it so securely that neither the thunderbolt nor the lightning shall break it. Strengthen yourselves, and bring as many as you can into this covenant chain. You desired us to open our minds and hearts to you, added the indignant brave. Look at the French; they are men; they are fortifying every where. But, we are ashamed
De Villiers (search for this): chapter 5
enable. The little intrenchment was in a glade between two eminences covered with trees, except within sixty yards chap. V.} 1754. of it. On the third day of July, about noon, six hundred French, with one hundred Indians, came Journal of De Villiers in New York Paris Documents. Varin to Bigot, 24 July, 1754. Correspondence of H. Sharpe. in eight, and took possession of one of the eminences, where every soldier found a large tree for his shelter, and could fire in security on the troops its influence through the raw provincial levies, so inferior to the French in numbers and in position. At last, H. Sharpe to his Brother, Annapolis, 19 April, 1755. after thirty of the English, and but three of the French had been killed, De Villiers himself fearing his ammunition would give out, proposed a parley. The terms of capitulation which were offered were interpreted to Washington, who did not understand French, and, as interpreted, were accepted. On the fourth day of July, the
James Hamilton (search for this): chapter 5
d, were in a republican way of thinking; but he confessed himself unable to bring them to order. The As- chap. V.} 1754. sembly of Virginia, pleading their want of means, single-handed, to answer all the ends designed, appealed to the royal beneficence. Virginia Address to the King. Knox, Controversy Reviewed, 129, 130. In England, it was the opinion of the greatest men, that the colonies should do something for themselves, and contribute jointly towards their defence. Penn to Hamilton, 29 Jan. 1754. H. Sharpe to Calvert, Secretary for Maryland in England, 3 May, 1754. The ministry as yet did nothing but order the independent companies, stationed at New York and at Charleston, to take part in defence of Western Virginia. Glen, the governor of South Carolina, proposed a meeting, in Virginia, of all the continental governors, to adjust a quota from each colony, to be employed on the Ohio. The Assembly of this Dominion, observed Dinwiddie, Dinwiddie to H. Sharpe, 3 Apri
William Shirley (search for this): chapter 5
the French. Stoddard to Johnson, 15 May, 1753. Holland to Clinton, 15 May, 1753. Smith to Shirley, 24 December, 1753. The Six Nations foamed with eagerness to take up the hatchet; for, said theemoved. We are very sensible, Message from the General Assembly of Massachusetts Bay to Governor Shirley, 4 January, 1754. they added, of the necessity of the colonies affording each other mutual ll, at all times, with great cheerfulness, furnish their just and reasonable quota towards it. Shirley was at hand to make the same use of this message, as of a similar petition six years before. Bof America. Without such a settlement, and a method to enforce it, there could be no union. Shirley to the Lords of Trade, month is not given. Referred to January, 1754. The day of the Secretarheir own consent. The warmest friend of union and the principal hand in forming the plan, Shirley to Sir Thomas Robinson, 24 December, 1754. was Benjamin Franklin. He encountered a great deal
William Livingston (search for this): chapter 5
entle land-tax, being the most equitable, must be our last resort. He looked forward with hope to the congress at Albany, but his dependence was on the parliament; for with parliament there would be no contending. And when their hands are in, he added, who knows but that they may lay the foundation of a regular government amongst us, by fixing a support for the officers of the crown, independent of chap. V.} 1754. an assembly? James Alexander, of New York, T. Sedgwick's Life of W. Livingston. the same who, with the elder William Smith, had limited the prerogative, by introducing the custom of granting but an annual support, thought that the British parliament should establish the duties for a colonial revenue, which the future American Grand Council, to be composed of deputies from all the provinces, should have no power to diminish. The royalist, Colden, saw no mode of obtaining the necessary funds but by parliamentary taxation; the members of the Grand Council, unless rem
Pompadour (search for this): chapter 5
macy were thrown down. An action of about a quarter of an hour ensued. Ten of the French were killed; among them Jumonville, the commander of the party; and twenty-one were made prisoners. When the tidings of this affray crossed the Atlantic, the name of Washington was, for the first time, heard in the saloons of Paris. The partisans of absolute monarchy pronounced it with execration. They foreboded the loss of the Western World; and the flatterers of Louis the Fifteenth and of Madame Pompadour, the high-born panders to royal lust, outraged the fair fame of the spotless hero as a violator of the laws of nations. What courtier, academician, or palace menial would have exchanged his hope of fame with that of the calumniated American? The death of Jumonville became the subject for loudest complaint; this martyr to the cause of feudalism and despotism was celebrated in heroic verse, and continents were invoked to weep for his fall. And at the very time when the name of Washingt
lish station; and on the nineteenth of April, at midnight, the two Indians from Canajoharie, escorted by Mohawk warriors, that filled the air with their whoops chap. V.} 1753 and halloos, presented to Johnson the belt of warning which should urge the English to protect the Ohio Indians and the Miamis. Col. Johnson to the Governor of New York, 20 April, 1753. In May more than thirty canoes were counted as they passed Oswego; part of an army going to the Beautiful River of the French. Stoddard to Johnson, 15 May, 1753. Holland to Clinton, 15 May, 1753. Smith to Shirley, 24 December, 1753. The Six Nations foamed with eagerness to take up the hatchet; for, said they, Ohio is ours. On the report that a body of twelve hundred men had been detached from Montreal, by the brave Duquesne, the successor of La Jonquiere, to occupy the Ohio valley, the Indians on the banks of that river,—promiscuous bands of Delawares, Shawnees, and Mingoes, or emigrant Iroquois,—after a council at Log
Robert Dinwiddie (search for this): chapter 5
cupy the banks of the Monongahela. Sanctioned by the orders from the king, Dinwiddie, Dinwiddie to Sharpe, of Maryland, 24 Nov., 1753. of Virginia, resolved toDinwiddie to Sharpe, of Maryland, 24 Nov., 1753. of Virginia, resolved to send a person of distinction to the commander of the French forces on the Ohio River, to know his reasons for invading the British dominions, while a solid peace suey under the superintendence of their own committee. The House of Burgesses, Dinwiddie complained, were in a republican way of thinking; but he confessed himself u colony, to be employed on the Ohio. The Assembly of this Dominion, observed Dinwiddie, Dinwiddie to H. Sharpe, 3 April, 1754. will not be directed what suppliesDinwiddie to H. Sharpe, 3 April, 1754. will not be directed what supplies to grant, and will always be guided by their own free determinations; they would think it an insult on their privileges, that they are so very fond of, to be under e of a confederacy which should truly represent the whole American people. Dinwiddie was all the while persevering in his plans at the West. Trent was already th
rters were the delegates from New England; yet Connecticut feared the negative power of the governor-general. On the royalist side none opposed but Delancey. He would have reserved to the colonial governors a negative on all elections to the grand council; but it was answered, that the colonies would then be virtually taxed by a chap. V.} 1754. congress of governors. The sources of revenue suggested in debate were a duty on spirits and a general stamp-tax. Smith's New York, II. 185. Gordon's History of the American Revolution, i. At length after much debate, in which Franklin manifested consummate address, the commissioners agreed on the proposed confederacy pretty unanimously. It is not altogether to my mind, said Franklin, giving an account of the result; but it is as I could get it, Ms. Letter of Franklin. and copies were ordered, that every member might lay the plan of union before his constituents for consideration; a copy was also to be transmitted to the governor of
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