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Fort Bedford (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ended this wise and deliberate act against the wounded hereditary affections and the monarchical propensities of the rural districts of the nation; till at last their fundamental measures had ceased to clash with the sentiment of the people, and the whole aristocracy had accepted their doctrines. Murray, afterwards Lord Mansfield, called himself a Whig, was one of the brightest ornaments of the party, and after Hardwicke, their oracle on questions of law. Cumberland, Newcastle, Devonshire, Bedford, Halifax, and the Marquis of Rockingham, were all reputed Whigs. So were George and Charles Townshend, the young Lord North, Grenville, Conwayand Sackville. On the vital elements chap. VII.} 1754. of civil liberty, the noble families which led the several factions had no systematic opinions. They knew not that America, which demanded their attention, would amalgamate the cause of royalty and oligarchy, and create parties in England on questions which the Revolution of 1688 had not even
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
housand men to America, held himself ready to sacrifice for peace all but honor and the protection due to his subjects; Instructions to Varin, N. Y. Paris Documents, XI. 2. consenting that New England should reach on the east to the Penobscot, and be divided from Canada on the north by the crest of the intervening highlands. Secret Instructions to Vandreuil, 1 April, 1754, Ibid. x. 8. While the negotiations were pending, Braddock arrived in the Chesapeake. In March, he reached Williamsburg, and visited Annapolis; on the fourteenth day of April, he, with Commodore Keppel, held a congress at Alexandria. There were present, of the American governors, Shirley, now next to Braddock in military rank; Delancey, of New York; Morris, of Pennsylvania; Sharpe, of Maryland; and Dinwiddie, of Virginia. Braddock directed their attention, first of all, to the subject of colonial revenue, H. Sharpe to Lord Baltimore, 19 April, 1754. on which his instructions commanded him to insist, a
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ts, or by a stamp-duty, which last method he at that time favored. Lieut. Gov. H. Sharpe to the Secretary, C. Calvert, 15 September, 1754. These measures were under consideration while the news was fresh of Washington's expulsion from the Ohio valley. Listening to the instance of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, the king instructed the Earl of Albemarle, then governor-in-chief of that Dominion, to grant lands west of the great ridge of mountains which separates the rivers Roanoke, James, and Potomac from the Mississippi, to such persons as should be desirous of settling them, in small quantities of not more than a thousand acres for any one person. chap. VII.} 1754 From the settlement of this tract it was represented that great additional security would be derived against the encroachments of the French. Representation of the Board of Trade to the king, 10 June, 1768. Thus Virginia seemed to have in charge the colonization of the west; and became the mother of states o
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
eld himself ready to sacrifice for peace all but honor and the protection due to his subjects; Instructions to Varin, N. Y. Paris Documents, XI. 2. consenting that New England should reach on the east to the Penobscot, and be divided from Canada on the north by the crest of the intervening highlands. Secret Instructions to Vandreuil, 1 April, 1754, Ibid. x. 8. While the negotiations were pending, Braddock arrived in the Chesapeake. In March, he reached Williamsburg, and visited Annapolis; on the fourteenth day of April, he, with Commodore Keppel, held a congress at Alexandria. There were present, of the American governors, Shirley, now next to Braddock in military rank; Delancey, of New York; Morris, of Pennsylvania; Sharpe, of Maryland; and Dinwiddie, of Virginia. Braddock directed their attention, first of all, to the subject of colonial revenue, H. Sharpe to Lord Baltimore, 19 April, 1754. on which his instructions commanded him to insist, and his anger kindled tha
Louisburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ned the danger to their chartered liberties from proprietary instructions; but, after a hearing before the Board of Trade, the address of the colonial legislature to their sovereign, like that of New York in the former year, was disdainfully rejected. Petitions for reimbursements and aids were received with displeasure; the people of New England were treated as Swiss ready to sell their services, desiring to be paid for protecting themselves. The reimbursement of Massachusetts for taking Louisburg was now condemned, as a subsidy to subjects who had only done their duty. You must fight for your own altars and firesides, was Sir Thomas Robinson's answer to the American agents, chap. VII.} 1755. as they were bandied to himself from Newcastle and from both to Halifax. Halifax alone had decision and a plan. In July, 1755, he insisted with the ministry on a general system to ease the mother country of the great and heavy expenses with which it of late years was burdened. Board to
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
n the lost territory. Coxe's Life of Horace Waxpole, II. 67. Charles Townshend would have sent three thousand regulars with three hundred thousand pounds, to New England, to train its inhabitants in war, and, through them, to conquer Canada. After assuming the hero, and breathing nothing but war, the administration confessed itmself ready to sacrifice for peace all but honor and the protection due to his subjects; Instructions to Varin, N. Y. Paris Documents, XI. 2. consenting that New England should reach on the east to the Penobscot, and be divided from Canada on the north by the crest of the intervening highlands. Secret Instructions to Vandreuireign, like that of New York in the former year, was disdainfully rejected. Petitions for reimbursements and aids were received with displeasure; the people of New England were treated as Swiss ready to sell their services, desiring to be paid for protecting themselves. The reimbursement of Massachusetts for taking Louisburg was
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Jersey showed the greatest contempt for the repeated solicitations of its aged governor. In Pennsylvania, in Maryland, in South Carolina, the grants of money by the assemblies were negatived, becaus royalists, if it comes, must come from his Majesty and the British parliament. Brief State of Pennsylvania. The Quakers also looked to the same authority, not for taxation, but for the abolition of the proprietary rule. Answer to Brief State of Pennsylvania. The contest along the American frontier was raging fiercely, when, in January, 1755, France proposed to England to leave the Ohi governors, Shirley, now next to Braddock in military rank; Delancey, of New York; Morris, of Pennsylvania; Sharpe, of Maryland; and Dinwiddie, of Virginia. Braddock directed their attention, first oto recover the authority which had been impaired by the unmanly facilities of former rulers. Pennsylvania had, in January, 1755, professed the loyalty of that province, and explained the danger to th
Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 7
o the Mississippi; and, as a measure of security against French encroachments, Halifax, by the king's command, Sir Thomas Robinson to the Board of Trade, 14 Juneugust, 1754. Such was the despotic, complicated, and impracticable plan of Halifax, founded so much on prerogative, as to be at war with the principles of the Enthe Second. of Horatio Gates, a young and gallant officer just returned from Nova Scotia. He was ready to answer questions, but they knew not what to ask. On the ad far as the Wabash, raze Niagara and Crown Point, surrender the peninsula of Nova Scotia, with a strip of land twenty leagues wide along the Bay of Fundy and the Atp. VII.} 1755. as they were bandied to himself from Newcastle and from both to Halifax. Halifax alone had decision and a plan. In July, 1755, he insisted with the Halifax alone had decision and a plan. In July, 1755, he insisted with the ministry on a general system to ease the mother country of the great and heavy expenses with which it of late years was burdened. Board to Secretary of State, Jul
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
de, and defended all their acts, in particular the instructions to Sir Danvers Osborne. The petition of the agent of Massachusetts was not allowed to be brought up. That to the House of Lords no one would offer; Letter of W. Bollan to Secretary d the bill, with the clause for America, was hurried through parliament. It is confidently stated, by the agent of Massachusetts, that a noble lord had then a bill in his pocket, ready to be brought in, to ascertain and regulate the colonial quote treated as Swiss ready to sell their services, desiring to be paid for protecting themselves. The reimbursement of Massachusetts for taking Louisburg was now condemned, as a subsidy to subjects who had only done their duty. You must fight for yovince objected to a stamp-tax as oppressive, though not to a moderate impost on West India products; and the voice of Massachusetts was unheeded, when, in November, it began to be thoroughly alarmed, and instructed its agent to oppose every thing th
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
hesitated in providing quarters for British soldiers, and would contribute to a general fund only when others did. New Jersey showed the greatest contempt for the repeated solicitations of its aged governor. In Pennsylvania, in Maryland, in South Carolina, the grants of money by the assemblies were negatived, because they were connected with the encroachments of popular power on the prerogative, schemes of future independency, the grasping at the disposition of all public money and filling allEngland, the government was more and more inclined to enforce the permanent authority of Great Britain. No Assembly had with more energy assumed to itself all the powers that spring from the management of the provincial treasury than that of South Carolina; and Richard Lyttleton, brother of Sir George Lyttelton, who, in November, 1755, entered the cabinet as chancellor of the exchequer, was sent to recover the authority which had been impaired by the unmanly facilities of former rulers. Pennsy
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