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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Granby (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
d overcome the still obstinate resistance from the king. Exaggerating the danger from the continuance of the riots, Halifax, on Monday, obeying Bedford's directions about the disposition of the troops, wrote to the king to appoint the Marquis of Granby, their partisan, to the command in chief, insinuating against Cumberland the old and just charge of cruelty and want of popularity; while the king himself, in violation of the constitution, privately ordered Cumberland to act as captain-general. new assurances against Bute's meddling in state affairs; that Mackenzie, Bute's brother, should be dismissed from his employment and place; that Lord Holland, the adviser of the plan for the regency bill, should meet with the same treatment; that Granby should be appointed commander-in-chief, to the exclusion of Cumberland; and that the ministers should settle the government in Ireland. Terms more humiliating could not have been devised. On the next day Grenville called to receive the 23. k
Halifax, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
The royal family are those who are in the chap. XII.} 1765. May. order of succession, one after another, answered Bedford, unmasking the malice in which the bill had been conceived. Richmond wished that, in the doubt, the judges should be consulted. On this, Sandwich moved the adjournment. The king, who had never intended to appoint his mother, was anxious to save her name from disagreeable discussion in parliament. When, therefore, he May 2. received the report of the occurrence, Halifax was authorized to use words whose meaning would admit of no dispute. But before he could deliver his message, Richmond proposed to include among those eligible to the regency, the princess dowager, and others descended from the late king. The motion was rejected by the ministers; after which Halifax, using the king's authority, renewed the same motion, except that he omitted the princess dowager. In this way the bill passed the House of Lords. The ministry had not intended so much; they
West Indies (search for this): chapter 12
be loaded upon any horse, cart, or carriage for conveyance. America abounded in iron ores of the best quality, as well as in wood and coal; slitting mills, steel furnaces, and plating forges, to work with a tilt hammer, were prohibited in the colonies as nuisances. While free labor was debarred of its natural rights, the slave trade was encouraged with unrelenting eagerness; and in the year that had just expired, from Liverpool alone, seventy-nine ships had borne from Africa to the West Indies and the continent more than fifteen thousand three hundred negroes, two-thirds as many as the first colonists of Massachusetts. And now taxation, direct and indirect, was added to colonial restrictions; and henceforward both were to go together. A duty was to be collected on foreign sugar, molasses, indigo, coffee, Madeira wine, imported directly into any of the plantations in America; also a duty on Portugal and Spanish wines, on Eastern silks, on Eastern calicoes, on foreign linen c
East India (search for this): chapter 12
ed on foreign sugar, molasses, indigo, coffee, Madeira wine, imported directly into any of the plantations in America; also a duty on Portugal and Spanish wines, on Eastern silks, on Eastern calicoes, on foreign linen cloth, on French lawn, though imported directly from Great Britain; on British colonial coffee shipped from one plantation to another. Nor was henceforward any chap. XII.} 1765. May. part of the old subsidy to be drawn back on the export of foreign goods of Europe or the East Indies, except on the export of white calicoes and muslins, on which a still higher duty was to be exacted and retained. And stamp duties were to be paid throughout all the British American colonies, on and after the first day of the coming November. These laws were to be enforced, not by the regular authorities only, but by naval and military officers, irresponsible to the civil power in the colonies. The penalties and forfeitures for breach of the revenue laws were to be decided in courts
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
who was always the friend of the protective policy; and it had the approval of the king. But Bedford having, like Edmund Burke, caught the more liberal views of political economy which were then beginning to prevail, especially in France and in Scotland, spoke on the side of freedom of trade; and the bill was refused a second reading. The silk weavers were exasperated; professing to believe that Bedford had been bought by the French. On Tuesday they went in a large body to Richmond 14. to commander-in-chief. He agreed that Bute should never, directly or indirectly, publicly or pri- chap. XII.} 1765. May. vately, have any thing to do with his business; he consented to dismiss Mackenzie from the administration of the affairs of Scotland, but not from the office of Privy Seal. Grenville was obstinate. But, interposed the king, he has my promise to continue in that employment for life; I passed to him my royal word, and, falling into great agitation, he went so far as to say, I
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 12
s; nor molasses, nor rice, with some exceptions; nor beaver, nor peltry, nor copper ore, nor pitch, nor tar, nor turpentine, nor masts, nor yards, nor bow- chap. XII.} 1765 May. sprits, nor coffee, nor pimento, nor cocoa-nuts, nor whale-fins, nor raw silk, nor hides, nor skins, nor pot and pearl ashes, to any place but Great Britain, not even to Ireland. Nor might any foreign ship enter a colonial harbor. Salt might be imported from any place into New England, New York, Pennsylvania, and Quebec; wines might be imported from the Madeiras and the Azores, but were to pay a duty in American ports for the British exchequer; and victuals, horses, and servants might be brought from Ireland. In all other respects, Great Britain was not only the sole market for the products of America, but the only storehouse for its supplies. Lest the colonists should multiply their flocks of sheep, and weave their own cloth, they might not use a ship, nor a boat, nor a carriage, nor even a packhorse, to
Halifax (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
manifest want of confidence in his ministers roused their jealousy, and when they received his orders to prepare a bill for carrying his design into effect, they thought to fix in the public mind their hostility to Bute and win popularity by disqualifying the princess dowager. To this end, in the choice of the regent, the king was to be restrained to the queen or any other person of the royal family. He approved the minute entirely, not knowing that, in the opinion of Bedford, Grenville, Halifax and Sandwich, his own family did not include his mother. At the request chap. XII.} 1765. April. of the duke of Cumberland, the king, again without consulting his four ministers, gave directions, that his uncle and his brothers, five in all, should be specially designated as fixed members of the council. This they refused to approve; and yielded to his wishes only on condition that he should renounce the privilege which he had reserved of appointing four others To Grenville he refused
Saint James (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
have a ministry; the former was under no necessity of being of it. He went about, vowing vengeance on the courtiers who had exposed him to such unworthy treatment, and resolved to remain in power in spite of the king. I can depend, said he, on all my friends as well as colleagues. There have been examples of new ministries that have not been able to last more than four-and-twenty hours. Meantime, the royal envoy at Hayes was making the Great Commoner every offer. I am ready to go to St. James's, said Pitt, if I can carry the constitution along with me. Since his health was no longer equal to the post of secretary of state, he might select any station. For measures, he might balance the Bourbon alliance by any alliance that he should judge the most valid, and direct the foreign course of chap. XII.} 1765. May 19. England at his pleasure. His views of the course to be pursued at home implied the condemnation of general warrants, a peerage for Pratt, and the restoration of Co
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
her dyeing woods; nor molasses, nor rice, with some exceptions; nor beaver, nor peltry, nor copper ore, nor pitch, nor tar, nor turpentine, nor masts, nor yards, nor bow- chap. XII.} 1765 May. sprits, nor coffee, nor pimento, nor cocoa-nuts, nor whale-fins, nor raw silk, nor hides, nor skins, nor pot and pearl ashes, to any place but Great Britain, not even to Ireland. Nor might any foreign ship enter a colonial harbor. Salt might be imported from any place into New England, New York, Pennsylvania, and Quebec; wines might be imported from the Madeiras and the Azores, but were to pay a duty in American ports for the British exchequer; and victuals, horses, and servants might be brought from Ireland. In all other respects, Great Britain was not only the sole market for the products of America, but the only storehouse for its supplies. Lest the colonists should multiply their flocks of sheep, and weave their own cloth, they might not use a ship, nor a boat, nor a carriage, nor even
Sandwich, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ained to the queen or any other person of the royal family. He approved the minute entirely, not knowing that, in the opinion of Bedford, Grenville, Halifax and Sandwich, his own family did not include his mother. At the request chap. XII.} 1765. April. of the duke of Cumberland, the king, again without consulting his four mither, answered Bedford, unmasking the malice in which the bill had been conceived. Richmond wished that, in the doubt, the judges should be consulted. On this, Sandwich moved the adjournment. The king, who had never intended to appoint his mother, was anxious to save her name from disagreeable discussion in parliament. When,on of the king's parpose. While chap. XII.} 1765. May 19. the royal envoy was negotiating with the Great Commoner at Hayes, Grenville, Bedford, Halifax, and Sandwich, confident that no new ministry could be formed, each by himself, went in to the king. Grenville insisted upon receiving orders relating to the change of govern
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