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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

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February 24th (search for this): chapter 24
to hold place by the tenure which the king disliked, the old whig party desired to make of the rising power of the people its handmaid, rather than its oracle. But Pitt spurned to capitulate with the aristocracy. Rockingham's tone, said he, is that of a minister, master of the court and the public, making openings to men who are seekers of office and candidates for ministry. I will not owe my coming into the closet to any court cabal or ministerial connection. On Monday, the twenty-fourth of February, the committee made its report to the house. Both England and America are now governed by the mob, said Grenville, continuing to oppose the repeal in every stage. Dyson hinted that internal taxes might be laid to ascertain the right. To modify the act, answered Palmerston, would be giving up the right and retaining the oppression. The motion for recommit chap. XXIV.} 1766. Feb. ment, was rejected by a vote of two hundred and forty to one hundred and thirty-three; and the bill
he continent. Stratford, in Con- chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. necticut, resolved never to be wanting, at. He pleaded further, that even chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. by charters and compacts, the people of Von the second day of March, it is chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. in me alone that the sovereign power resiat the British parliament have no chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. right to tax the Americans. The declarmust submit, voted for the repeal, chap XXIV.} 1766. Mar. pleading his unwillingness to act on suchreat right of taxation without an chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. exemption of the colonies. Having thusn that had long slumbered in their chap XXIV.} 1766. Mar. graves. The third reading of the repeaof Pitt; general warrants were de- chap XXIV.} 1766. April. dared illegal; and Edmund Burke, alreaiseul, 21 April, 1766. To be pre- chap. XXIV.} 1766. April. pared for the change, and in the hope gland, the conqueror of Canada and chap. XXIV} 1766. May. the Ohio, the founder of empire, the apo[12 more...]
February 19th (search for this): chapter 24
ts two clauses, the one affirming the authority of parliament over America, in all cases whatsoever; and the other declaring the opposite resolutions of the American Assemblies to be null and chap. XXIV} 1766. Mar. void. The bill for the repeal of the Stamp Act, was read a second time upon Tuesday, the eleventh of March. Chatham Corr. II., 384, note. The date of every one of the letters of W. G. Hamilton is wrongly given. For 15 Feb., read 8 March; for 17 Feb., read 10 March; for 19 Feb., read 12 March, &c., & c. How could these dates have been so changed? The House of Lords was so full on the occasion, that strangers were not admitted. Ten peers spoke against the repeal, and the lords sat between eleven and twelve hours, which was later than ever was remembered. Once more Mansfield and Camden exerted all their powers on opposite sides; while Temple indulged in personalities, aimed at Camden. The submission of the Americans, argued the Duke of Bedford, who closed the
February 17th (search for this): chapter 24
ll itself was passed, with its two clauses, the one affirming the authority of parliament over America, in all cases whatsoever; and the other declaring the opposite resolutions of the American Assemblies to be null and chap. XXIV} 1766. Mar. void. The bill for the repeal of the Stamp Act, was read a second time upon Tuesday, the eleventh of March. Chatham Corr. II., 384, note. The date of every one of the letters of W. G. Hamilton is wrongly given. For 15 Feb., read 8 March; for 17 Feb., read 10 March; for 19 Feb., read 12 March, &c., & c. How could these dates have been so changed? The House of Lords was so full on the occasion, that strangers were not admitted. Ten peers spoke against the repeal, and the lords sat between eleven and twelve hours, which was later than ever was remembered. Once more Mansfield and Camden exerted all their powers on opposite sides; while Temple indulged in personalities, aimed at Camden. The submission of the Americans, argued the Duk
March 19th, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
pecies was not a mere chimera. Otis in Boston Gazette. Joseph Warren, a young man whom nature had adorned with grace, and manly beauty, and a courage that would have been rash audacity had it not been tempered by self-control, saw clearly that the more equal division of property among the people, tended also to equalize and diffuse their influence and authority; and he uttered the new war-cry of the world—freedom AND chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. equality. Joseph Warren to Edmund Dana, 19 March, 1766. Death, said he, with all its tortures, is preferable to slavery. The thought of independence, said Hutchinson despondingly, has entered the heart of America. Hutchinson to Thomas Pownail, March, 1766. Virginia had kindled the flame; Virginia had now the honor, by the hand of one of her sons, to close the discussion, by embodying, authoritatively, in calm and dignified, though in somewhat pedantic language, the sentiments which the contest had ripened. It was Richard Bland, A
March 18th, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
t meddled with public business, and was firmly resolved for the future to maintain the same reserve. Yet he wished that an administration might be formed by a junction of the ablest men from every political section. De Guerchy to Praslin, 18 March, 1766. The bill passed without a further division; but a second protest, containing a vigorous defence of the policy of Grenville, and breathing in every line the sanguinary desire to enforce the Stamp Act, was introduced by Temple, and signed rrections in my possession. corrected, the ministers signified to the dissenters in America, how agreeable the spirit of gratitude would be to the dissenters in England, and to the Presbyterians to the north of the Tweed. Moffat to Stiles, 18 March, 1766. A change of ministry was more and more spoken of. The nation demanded to see Pitt in the government; and two of the ablest members of the cabinet, Grafton and Conway, continued to insist upon it. But Rockingham, who, during the repeal of
March, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
pered by self-control, saw clearly that the more equal division of property among the people, tended also to equalize and diffuse their influence and authority; and he uttered the new war-cry of the world—freedom AND chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. equality. Joseph Warren to Edmund Dana, 19 March, 1766. Death, said he, with all its tortures, is preferable to slavery. The thought of independence, said Hutchinson despondingly, has entered the heart of America. Hutchinson to Thomas Pownail, March, 1766. Virginia had kindled the flame; Virginia had now the honor, by the hand of one of her sons, to close the discussion, by embodying, authoritatively, in calm and dignified, though in somewhat pedantic language, the sentiments which the contest had ripened. It was Richard Bland, An inquiry into the right of the British Colonies, &c.; No date, but compare resolutions of the Sons of Liberty at Norfolk Court House, 31 March, 1766. of the Ancient Dominion, who, through the press, claime
March 22nd, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
carried the bill up to the House of Lords, where Temple and Lyttelton did not suffer it to receive its first reading without debate. On Friday, the seventh of March, the declaratory bill was to have its second reading. It was moved, though no division took place, to postpone it to the bill for the repeal, for if the latter should miscarry, the former would be unnecessary; and if the latter passed, the former would be but a ridiculous farce after deep tragedy. Hammersley to Sharpe, 22 March, 1766. My lords, when I spoke last on this subject, said Camden, opposing the bill altogether, I thought I had delivered my sentiments so fully, and supported them with such reasons and such authorities, that I should be under no necessity of troubling your lordships again. But I find I have been considered as the broacher of new-fangled doctrines, contrary to the laws of this kingdom, and subversive of the rights of parliament. My lords, this is a heavy charge, but more so, when m
May, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
Chapter 24: The House of Lords give way with protests.— Rockingham's administration continued. February—May, 1766. The heat of the battle was over. The Stamp Act chap. XXIV.} 1766. Feb. was sure to be repealed; and every one felt that Pitt, would soon be at the head of affairs. Rockingham still aspired to intercept his promotion, and engage his services. In its last struggle to hold place by the tenure which the king disliked, the old whig party desired to make of the rising power of the people its handmaid, rather than its oracle. But Pitt spurned to capitulate with the aristocracy. Rockingham's tone, said he, is that of a minister, master of the court and the public, making openings to men who are seekers of office and candidates for ministry. I will not owe my coming into the closet to any court cabal or ministerial connection. On Monday, the twenty-fourth of February, the committee made its report to the house. Both England and America are now governed by t
n, and the bill itself was passed, with its two clauses, the one affirming the authority of parliament over America, in all cases whatsoever; and the other declaring the opposite resolutions of the American Assemblies to be null and chap. XXIV} 1766. Mar. void. The bill for the repeal of the Stamp Act, was read a second time upon Tuesday, the eleventh of March. Chatham Corr. II., 384, note. The date of every one of the letters of W. G. Hamilton is wrongly given. For 15 Feb., read 8 March; for 17 Feb., read 10 March; for 19 Feb., read 12 March, &c., & c. How could these dates have been so changed? The House of Lords was so full on the occasion, that strangers were not admitted. Ten peers spoke against the repeal, and the lords sat between eleven and twelve hours, which was later than ever was remembered. Once more Mansfield and Camden exerted all their powers on opposite sides; while Temple indulged in personalities, aimed at Camden. The submission of the Americans, a
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