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lly apprehended. Otis, at a meeting at the Town Hall in Boston, to fix a time for the rejoicings, told the people that the distinction between inland taxes and port duties was without foundation; for whoever had a right to impose the one, had a right to impose the other; and, therefore, as the parliament had given up the one, they had given up the other; and the merchants were fools if they submitted any longer to the laws restraining their trade, which ought to be free. A bright day in May was set apart for the display chap. XXIV} 1766. May. of the public gladness, and the spot where resistance to the Stamp Act began, was the centre of attraction. At one in the morning the bell nearest Liberty Tree was the first to be rung; at dawn, colors and pendants rose over the housetops all around it; and the steeple of the nearest meeting-house was hung with banners. During the day all prisoners for debt were released by subscription. In the evening the town shone as though night ha
March 10th (search for this): chapter 24
passed, with its two clauses, the one affirming the authority of parliament over America, in all cases whatsoever; and the other declaring the opposite resolutions of the American Assemblies to be null and chap. XXIV} 1766. Mar. void. The bill for the repeal of the Stamp Act, was read a second time upon Tuesday, the eleventh of March. Chatham Corr. II., 384, note. The date of every one of the letters of W. G. Hamilton is wrongly given. For 15 Feb., read 8 March; for 17 Feb., read 10 March; for 19 Feb., read 12 March, &c., & c. How could these dates have been so changed? The House of Lords was so full on the occasion, that strangers were not admitted. Ten peers spoke against the repeal, and the lords sat between eleven and twelve hours, which was later than ever was remembered. Once more Mansfield and Camden exerted all their powers on opposite sides; while Temple indulged in personalities, aimed at Camden. The submission of the Americans, argued the Duke of Bedford, w
ut the continent. Assembling at Canterbury in March, Windham county named Israel Putnam, of Pomfrery of the world—freedom AND chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. equality. Joseph Warren to Edmund Dana, 19 M pleaded further, that even chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. by charters and compacts, the people of Virginie repeal ensued. Grenville chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. and his party still combated eagerly and obstin British parliament have no chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. right to tax the Americans. The declaratory r with contempt. The fore- chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. fathers of the Americans did not leave their naan Assemblies to be null and chap. XXIV} 1766. Mar. void. The bill for the repeal of the Stamp Aubmit, voted for the repeal, chap XXIV.} 1766. Mar. pleading his unwillingness to act on such a que had long slumbered in their chap XXIV.} 1766. Mar. graves. The third reading of the repeal bille king, would be peculiarly chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. proper, we in effect annihilate this branch of [4 more...]
March 11th (search for this): chapter 24
which could not be recalled, except in the utmost emergency. Yet the motion for a postponement of the subject was not pressed to a division, and the bill itself was passed, with its two clauses, the one affirming the authority of parliament over America, in all cases whatsoever; and the other declaring the opposite resolutions of the American Assemblies to be null and chap. XXIV} 1766. Mar. void. The bill for the repeal of the Stamp Act, was read a second time upon Tuesday, the eleventh of March. Chatham Corr. II., 384, note. The date of every one of the letters of W. G. Hamilton is wrongly given. For 15 Feb., read 8 March; for 17 Feb., read 10 March; for 19 Feb., read 12 March, &c., & c. How could these dates have been so changed? The House of Lords was so full on the occasion, that strangers were not admitted. Ten peers spoke against the repeal, and the lords sat between eleven and twelve hours, which was later than ever was remembered. Once more Mansfield and Camd
March 31st, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
red the heart of America. Hutchinson to Thomas Pownail, March, 1766. Virginia had kindled the flame; Virginia had now the honor, by the hand of one of her sons, to close the discussion, by embodying, authoritatively, in calm and dignified, though in somewhat pedantic language, the sentiments which the contest had ripened. It was Richard Bland, An inquiry into the right of the British Colonies, &c.; No date, but compare resolutions of the Sons of Liberty at Norfolk Court House, 31 March, 1766. of the Ancient Dominion, who, through the press, claimed freedom from all parliamentary legislation; and pointed to independence as the remedy for a refusal of redress. He derived the English constitution from Anglo-Saxon principles of the most perfect equality, which invested every freeman with a right to vote at the election of members of parliament. If, said he, nine tenths of the people of Britain are deprived of the high privilege of being electors, it would be a work worthy of t
Chapter 24: The House of Lords give way with protests.— Rockingham's administration continued. February—May, 1766. The heat of the battle was over. The Stamp Act chap. XXIV.} 1766. Feb. was sure to be repealed; and every one felt that Pitt, would soon be at the head of affairs. Rockingham still aspired to interceptFeb. was sure to be repealed; and every one felt that Pitt, would soon be at the head of affairs. Rockingham still aspired to intercept his promotion, and engage his services. In its last struggle to hold place by the tenure which the king disliked, the old whig party desired to make of the rising power of the people its handmaid, rather than its oracle. But Pitt spurned to capitulate with the aristocracy. Rockingham's tone, said he, is that of a minister, masertain the right. To modify the act, answered Palmerston, would be giving up the right and retaining the oppression. The motion for recommit chap. XXIV.} 1766. Feb. ment, was rejected by a vote of two hundred and forty to one hundred and thirty-three; and the bill for the repeal was ordered to be brought in. Upon this, Blac
words. For, on Tuesday, the fourth of March, 1766, came on the third reading of the bill declaratory of the absolute power of parliament to bind America, as well as that for the repeal of the Stamp Act. Again Pitt De Guerchy to Praslin, 7 March. moved to leave out the claim of right in all cases whatsoever. The analogy between Ireland and America was much insisted upon, and he renewed his opinion, that the parliament had no right to tax America, while unrepresented. This opinion, saithe next day, Conway, and more than one hundred and fifty members of the House of Commons, carried the bill up to the House of Lords, where Temple and Lyttelton did not suffer it to receive its first reading without debate. On Friday, the seventh of March, the declaratory bill was to have its second reading. It was moved, though no division took place, to postpone it to the bill for the repeal, for if the latter should miscarry, the former would be unnecessary; and if the latter passed, the
March 17th (search for this): chapter 24
of the realm, as constituted in 1688. The first had, in the spirit of the mediaeval monarchy, derived the right to the throne from God; the second, resting on principles that had grown up in opposition to the old legitimacy, deified established law, and sought to bind its own and coming ages by statutes which were but the wisdom of a less enlightened generation that had long slumbered in their chap XXIV.} 1766. Mar. graves. The third reading of the repeal bill took place on the seventeenth of March. Bute, in whose administration the taxing of America had been resolved upon, spoke once more to maintain his opinion. He insisted that, as minister, he had done good to his country; in retiring, he had consulted his own character and tastes; and since his retreat he had not meddled with public business, and was firmly resolved for the future to maintain the same reserve. Yet he wished that an administration might be formed by a junction of the ablest men from every political sectio
March 18th (search for this): chapter 24
ent itself, and when our interposition, for many obvious reasons, alluding to the known opinion of the king, would be peculiarly chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. proper, we in effect annihilate this branch of the legislature, and vote ourselves useless. The people of England had once adopted that opinion. It was certain that the people of America were already convinced that the House of Lords had outlived its functions, and was for them become worse than useless. On the morning of the eighteenth day of March, the king went in state to Westminster, and gave his assent, among other bills, to what ever after he regarded as the well-spring of all his sorrows, the fatal repeal of the Stamp Act. He returned from signing the repeal, amid the shouts and huzzas of the applauding multitude. There was a public dinner of the friends of America in honor of the event; Bow bells were set a ringing; and on the Thames the ships displayed all their colors. At night a bonfire was kindled, and houses
July 17th, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
of the Stamp Act, had also given his assent to the act declaratory 6 Geo. III. c. XII. of the supreme power of parliament over America in all cases whatsoever. While swift vessels hurried with the news across the Atlantic, the cider act was modified by the ministry, with the aid of Pitt; general warrants were de- chap XXIV.} 1766. April. dared illegal; and Edmund Burke, already famed for most shining talents, and sanguine friendship, for America, Holt's N. Y. Gaz. 1228, for 17 July, 1766. was consulting merchants and manufacturers on the means of improving and extending the commerce of the whole empire. When Grenville, madly in earnest, deprecated any change in the sacred Act of Navigation, Burke bitterly ridiculed him on the idea that any act was sacred, if it wanted correction. Free ports were, therefore, established in Jamaica and in Dominica, 6 Geo. III. c. XLIX. which meant only that British ports were licensed to infringe the acts of navigation of other power
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