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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

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April 21st (search for this): chapter 24
htiness. Under instructions given by the former administration, the Governor of Grenada claimed to rule the island by prerogative; and Sir Hugh Palliser, Ordinances of 3 April, 1766. at Newfoundland, arrogated the monopoly of the fisheries to Great Britain and Ireland. The strength of the ministry was tested on their chap. XXIV.} 1766. April. introducing a new tax on windows. The English, said Grenville, must now pay what the colonists should have paid; De Guerchy to Choiseul, 21 April. and the subject was referred to a committee by a diminished majority. Great Britain not only gave up the Stamp Tax, but itself defrayed the expenses Treasury Minute of 4 April. of the experiment out of the sinking fund. The treasury asked what was to be done with the stamps in those colonies where the Stamp Act had not taken place? Treasury Minute Book, XXXVII. 414. C. Lowondles to Beresfotrd, Treasury Letter look, XXIII., 296. and they were ordered to be returned to England, Tr
February 20th, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
hoosing the risk of civil war and independence, rather than compliance. Canada, Nova Scotia, and the Floridas, which were military governments, had submitted; the rest of the continent was firm. Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Maryland had opened their courts. From New-York, the Governor reported that he was left entirely to himself; that nothing but a superior force would bring the people to a sense of duty; that every one around him was an abettor of resistance. Moore to Conway, 20 Feb., 1766. A merchant, who had signed a stamped bond for a Mediterranean pass, was obliged to stand forth publicly, and ask forgiveness before thousands. The in fluence of the Sons of Liberty spread on every side Following their advice, the people of Woodbridge, in New Jersey, recommended the union of the provinces throughout the continent. Stratford, in Con- chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. necticut, resolved never to be wanting, and advised a firm and lasting union, to be fostered by a mutual corresp
become an alien to its mother state. Oppression has produced very great and unexpected events. The Helvetic confederacy, the states of the United Netherlands, are instances in the annals of Europe of the glorious actions a petty people, in comparison, can perform, when united in the cause of liberty. At that time, Louis XV. was setting his heel on the parliaments of France, the courts of justice which alone offered barriers to his will. In me, said he to them solemnly, on the second day of March, it is chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. in me alone that the sovereign power resides. Justice is done only in my name, and the fulness of judicial authority remains always in me. To me alone belongs the legislative power, irresponsible and undivided. Public order emanates entirely from me. I am the people. Mon peuple n'est qu'un avec moi. Against this the people could have but one rallying cry, Freedom and Equality; and America was compelled to teach the utterance of the powerful words.
April 22nd, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
and, and to the Presbyterians to the north of the Tweed. Moffat to Stiles, 18 March, 1766. A change of ministry was more and more spoken of. The nation demanded to see Pitt in the government; and two of the ablest members of the cabinet, Grafton and Conway, continued to insist upon it. But Rockingham, who, during the repeal of the Stamp Act, had been dumb, leaving the brunt of the battle to be borne by Camden and Shelburne, was determined it should not be so; Grafton to Conway, 22 April, 1766. and Newcastle and Winchelsea and Egmont concurred with him. De Guerchy to Choiseul, 21 April, 1766. To be pre- chap. XXIV.} 1766. April. pared for the change, and in the hope of becoming, under the new administration, secretary for the colonies, Charles Townshend assiduously courted the Duke of Grafton. Pitt, on retiring to recruit the health which his unparalleled exertions in the winter had utterly subverted, made a farewell speech, his last in the House of Commons, wishing tha
liament, and to rule England for two generations. It is the declaration of the new tory party, in favor of the English constitution as it was, against any countenance to the extension of suffrage, the reform of parliament, and the effective exercise of private judgment. It is the modern form of an ancient doctrine. Oxford had said unconditional obedience to the king was the badge of loyalty; this protest substituted unconditional obedience to the legislature of the realm, as constituted in 1688. The first had, in the spirit of the mediaeval monarchy, derived the right to the throne from God; the second, resting on principles that had grown up in opposition to the old legitimacy, deified established law, and sought to bind its own and coming ages by statutes which were but the wisdom of a less enlightened generation that had long slumbered in their chap XXIV.} 1766. Mar. graves. The third reading of the repeal bill took place on the seventeenth of March. Bute, in whose adminis
April 21st, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
ge of ministry was more and more spoken of. The nation demanded to see Pitt in the government; and two of the ablest members of the cabinet, Grafton and Conway, continued to insist upon it. But Rockingham, who, during the repeal of the Stamp Act, had been dumb, leaving the brunt of the battle to be borne by Camden and Shelburne, was determined it should not be so; Grafton to Conway, 22 April, 1766. and Newcastle and Winchelsea and Egmont concurred with him. De Guerchy to Choiseul, 21 April, 1766. To be pre- chap. XXIV.} 1766. April. pared for the change, and in the hope of becoming, under the new administration, secretary for the colonies, Charles Townshend assiduously courted the Duke of Grafton. Pitt, on retiring to recruit the health which his unparalleled exertions in the winter had utterly subverted, made a farewell speech, his last in the House of Commons, wishing that faction might cease, and avowing his own purpose of remaining independent of any personal connections
March 4th, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
766. Mar. in me alone that the sovereign power resides. Justice is done only in my name, and the fulness of judicial authority remains always in me. To me alone belongs the legislative power, irresponsible and undivided. Public order emanates entirely from me. I am the people. Mon peuple n'est qu'un avec moi. Against this the people could have but one rallying cry, Freedom and Equality; and America was compelled to teach the utterance of the powerful words. For, on Tuesday, the fourth of March, 1766, came on the third reading of the bill declaratory of the absolute power of parliament to bind America, as well as that for the repeal of the Stamp Act. Again Pitt De Guerchy to Praslin, 7 March. moved to leave out the claim of right in all cases whatsoever. The analogy between Ireland and America was much insisted upon, and he renewed his opinion, that the parliament had no right to tax America, while unrepresented. This opinion, said he, has been treated, in my absence, as t
February 15th (search for this): chapter 24
d to a division, and the bill itself was passed, with its two clauses, the one affirming the authority of parliament over America, in all cases whatsoever; and the other declaring the opposite resolutions of the American Assemblies to be null and chap. XXIV} 1766. Mar. void. The bill for the repeal of the Stamp Act, was read a second time upon Tuesday, the eleventh of March. Chatham Corr. II., 384, note. The date of every one of the letters of W. G. Hamilton is wrongly given. For 15 Feb., read 8 March; for 17 Feb., read 10 March; for 19 Feb., read 12 March, &c., & c. How could these dates have been so changed? The House of Lords was so full on the occasion, that strangers were not admitted. Ten peers spoke against the repeal, and the lords sat between eleven and twelve hours, which was later than ever was remembered. Once more Mansfield and Camden exerted all their powers on opposite sides; while Temple indulged in personalities, aimed at Camden. The submission of th
766. at Newfoundland, arrogated the monopoly of the fisheries to Great Britain and Ireland. The strength of the ministry was tested on their chap. XXIV.} 1766. April. introducing a new tax on windows. The English, said Grenville, must now pay what the colonists should have paid; De Guerchy to Choiseul, 21 April. and the subject was referred to a committee by a diminished majority. Great Britain not only gave up the Stamp Tax, but itself defrayed the expenses Treasury Minute of 4 April. of the experiment out of the sinking fund. The treasury asked what was to be done with the stamps in those colonies where the Stamp Act had not taken place? Treasury Minute Book, XXXVII. 414. C. Lowondles to Beresfotrd, Treasury Letter look, XXIII., 296. and they were ordered to be returned to England, Treasury Minute Book, XXXVII. 214. where the curious traveller may still see bags of them, cumbering the office from which they were issued. At the same time the merchants of Londo
March 13th, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 24
e the words of Locke, what property have they in that which another may by right take, when he pleases, to himself? Locke on Civil Government. Book II. ch. XI. ยง 138, 139, 140. Thus did the defence of the liberties of a continent lead one of the highest judicial officers of England, in the presence of the House of Lords, to utter a prayer for the reform of the House of Commons, by a more equal settlement of the representative authority. Compare Lord Charlemont to Henry Flood, 13 March, 1766. The reform was needed; for in Great Britain, with perhaps, at that time, eight millions of inhabitants, less than ten thousand, or as some thought, less than six thousand persons, many of whom were humbled by dependence, or debauched by corruption, elected a majority of the House of Commons, and the powers of government were actually sequestered into the hands of about two hundred men. Camden spoke deliberately, and his words were of the greater moment, as they were the fruit of a month
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