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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Due Choiseul (search for this): chapter 24
ies to Great Britain and Ireland. The strength of the ministry was tested on their chap. XXIV.} 1766. April. introducing a new tax on windows. The English, said Grenville, must now pay what the colonists should have paid; De Guerchy to Choiseul, 21 April. and the subject was referred to a committee by a diminished majority. Great Britain not only gave up the Stamp Tax, but itself defrayed the expenses Treasury Minute of 4 April. of the experiment out of the sinking fund. The treastamp Act, had been dumb, leaving the brunt of the battle to be borne by Camden and Shelburne, was determined it should not be so; Grafton to Conway, 22 April, 1766. and Newcastle and Winchelsea and Egmont concurred with him. De Guerchy to Choiseul, 21 April, 1766. To be pre- chap. XXIV.} 1766. April. pared for the change, and in the hope of becoming, under the new administration, secretary for the colonies, Charles Townshend assiduously courted the Duke of Grafton. Pitt, on retiring to
Hutchinson (search for this): chapter 24
ty; and he uttered the new war-cry of the world—freedom AND chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. equality. Joseph Warren to Edmund Dana, 19 March, 1766. Death, said he, with all its tortures, is preferable to slavery. The thought of independence, said Hutchinson despondingly, has entered the heart of America. Hutchinson to Thomas Pownail, March, 1766. Virginia had kindled the flame; Virginia had now the honor, by the hand of one of her sons, to close the discussion, by embodying, authoritativelyHutchinson to Thomas Pownail, March, 1766. Virginia had kindled the flame; Virginia had now the honor, by the hand of one of her sons, to close the discussion, by embodying, authoritatively, in calm and dignified, though in somewhat pedantic language, the sentiments which the contest had ripened. It was Richard Bland, An inquiry into the right of the British Colonies, &c.; No date, but compare resolutions of the Sons of Liberty at Norfolk Court House, 31 March, 1766. of the Ancient Dominion, who, through the press, claimed freedom from all parliamentary legislation; and pointed to independence as the remedy for a refusal of redress. He derived the English constitution from An
t that time noticed, that the ministry had carried through the mutiny bill, 6 Geo. III. c. XVIII. with the obnoxious American clauses of the last year; and that the king, in giving his assent to the repeal 6 Geo. III. c. XI. of the Stamp Act, had also given his assent to the act declaratory 6 Geo. III. c. XII. of theGeo. III. c. XII. of the supreme power of parliament over America in all cases whatsoever. While swift vessels hurried with the news across the Atlantic, the cider act was modified by thction. Free ports were, therefore, established in Jamaica and in Dominica, 6 Geo. III. c. XLIX. which meant only that British ports were licensed to infringe thgs the piece, to be paid into the exchequer, and disposed of by parliament. 6 Geo. III. c. LII. Thus taxes for regulating trade were renewed in conformity to forly so far sharpened as to prohibit landing non-enumerated goods in Ireland. 6 Geo. III. c. LII. The colonial officers did not relax from their haughtiness. Unde
Ezra Stiles (search for this): chapter 24
the office from which they were issued. At the same time the merchants of London wrote to entreat the merchants of America to take no offence at the declaratory act, and in letters, which Rockingham and Sir George Saville MS. draft of a letter with the corrections in my possession. corrected, the ministers signified to the dissenters in America, how agreeable the spirit of gratitude would be to the dissenters in England, and to the Presbyterians to the north of the Tweed. Moffat to Stiles, 18 March, 1766. A change of ministry was more and more spoken of. The nation demanded to see Pitt in the government; and two of the ablest members of the cabinet, Grafton and Conway, continued to insist upon it. But Rockingham, who, during the repeal of the Stamp Act, had been dumb, leaving the brunt of the battle to be borne by Camden and Shelburne, was determined it should not be so; Grafton to Conway, 22 April, 1766. and Newcastle and Winchelsea and Egmont concurred with him.
Hugh Palliser (search for this): chapter 24
iece, to be paid into the exchequer, and disposed of by parliament. 6 Geo. III. c. LII. Thus taxes for regulating trade were renewed in conformity to former laws; and the Act of Navigation was purposely so far sharpened as to prohibit landing non-enumerated goods in Ireland. 6 Geo. III. c. LII. The colonial officers did not relax from their haughtiness. Under instructions given by the former administration, the Governor of Grenada claimed to rule the island by prerogative; and Sir Hugh Palliser, Ordinances of 3 April, 1766. at Newfoundland, arrogated the monopoly of the fisheries to Great Britain and Ireland. The strength of the ministry was tested on their chap. XXIV.} 1766. April. introducing a new tax on windows. The English, said Grenville, must now pay what the colonists should have paid; De Guerchy to Choiseul, 21 April. and the subject was referred to a committee by a diminished majority. Great Britain not only gave up the Stamp Tax, but itself defrayed t
Isaac Barre (search for this): chapter 24
bell nearest Liberty Tree was the first to be rung; at dawn, colors and pendants rose over the housetops all around it; and the steeple of the nearest meeting-house was hung with banners. During the day all prisoners for debt were released by subscription. In the evening the town shone as though night had not come; an obelisk on the Common was brilliant with a loyal inscription; the houses round Liberty Tree exhibited illuminated figures, not of the king only, but of Pitt, and Camden, and Barre; and Liberty Tree itself was decorated with lanterns, till its boughs could hold no more. All the wisest agreed that disastrous consequences would have ensued from the attempt to enforce the Act, so that never was there a more rapid transition of a people from gloom to joy. They compared themselves to a bird escaped from the net of the fowler, and once more striking its wings freely in the upper air; or to Joseph, the Israelite, whom Providence had likewise wonderfully redeemed from the p
Charles Townshend (search for this): chapter 24
nued to insist upon it. But Rockingham, who, during the repeal of the Stamp Act, had been dumb, leaving the brunt of the battle to be borne by Camden and Shelburne, was determined it should not be so; Grafton to Conway, 22 April, 1766. and Newcastle and Winchelsea and Egmont concurred with him. De Guerchy to Choiseul, 21 April, 1766. To be pre- chap. XXIV.} 1766. April. pared for the change, and in the hope of becoming, under the new administration, secretary for the colonies, Charles Townshend assiduously courted the Duke of Grafton. Pitt, on retiring to recruit the health which his unparalleled exertions in the winter had utterly subverted, made a farewell speech, his last in the House of Commons, wishing that faction might cease, and avowing his own purpose of remaining independent of any personal connections whatsoever; while the ships bore across the Atlantic the glad news of the repeal, which he had been the first to counsel, and the ablest to defend. The joy was, f
Rockingham (search for this): chapter 24
at of the battle was over. The Stamp Act chap. XXIV.} 1766. Feb. was sure to be repealed; and every one felt that Pitt, would soon be at the head of affairs. Rockingham still aspired to intercept his promotion, and engage his services. In its last struggle to hold place by the tenure which the king disliked, the old whig partye issued. At the same time the merchants of London wrote to entreat the merchants of America to take no offence at the declaratory act, and in letters, which Rockingham and Sir George Saville MS. draft of a letter with the corrections in my possession. corrected, the ministers signified to the dissenters in America, how agrespoken of. The nation demanded to see Pitt in the government; and two of the ablest members of the cabinet, Grafton and Conway, continued to insist upon it. But Rockingham, who, during the repeal of the Stamp Act, had been dumb, leaving the brunt of the battle to be borne by Camden and Shelburne, was determined it should not be so
was, for a time, unmixed with apprehen- May. sion. South Carolina voted Pitt a statue; and Virginia a statue to the king, and an obelisk, on which were to be engraved the names of those who, in England, had signalized themselves for freedom. My thanks they shall have cordially, said Washington, for their opposition to any act of oppression. The consequences of enforcing the Stamp Act, he was convinced would have been more direful than usually apprehended. Otis, at a meeting at the Town Hall in Boston, to fix a time for the rejoicings, told the people that the distinction between inland taxes and port duties was without foundation; for whoever had a right to impose the one, had a right to impose the other; and, therefore, as the parliament had given up the one, they had given up the other; and the merchants were fools if they submitted any longer to the laws restraining their trade, which ought to be free. A bright day in May was set apart for the display chap. XXIV} 1766. M
nty-one. Northington, than whom no one had been more vociferous that the Americans must submit, voted for the repeal, chap XXIV.} 1766. Mar. pleading his unwillingness to act on such a question against the House of Commons. Immediately, the protest which Lyttelton had prepared against committing the bill, was produced, and signed by thirty-three peers, with Bedford at their head. Against the total repeal of the Stamp Act, they maintained that such a strange and unheard of submission of King, Lords, and Commons to a successful insurrection of the colonies would make the authority of Great Britain contemptible; that the reason assigned for their disobeying the Stamp Act, extended to all other laws, and, if admitted, must set them absolutely free from obedience to the power of the British legislature; that any endeavor to enforce it hereafter, against the will of the colonies, would bring on the contest for their total independence, rendered, perhaps, more dangerous and formidable
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