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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
hat he might select ministers from among them all, and he came to the throne resolved to begin to govern as soon as he should begin to reign. Bolingbroke's Patriot King, 77. Yet the established constitution was more immovable than his designs. Pitt did not retire from the ministry till the country was growing weary of his German war, and a majority in the British cabinet opposed his counsels. Newcastle, so long the representative of a cabal of the oligarchy, which had once been more repecte both whig and tory were very bitter against Shelburne; some of the Rockingham whigs most of all, particularly C. J. Fox and Edmund Burke. of 1763, as became a humane and liberal man; in other respects he was an admirer of CHAP. VI.} 1763. May. Pitt. While his report was waited for, Grenville, through Charles Jenkinson, C. Jenkinson to Sir Jeffery Amherst, 11 May, 1763. Treasury Letter Book, XXII. 392. began his system of saving, by an order to the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in A
Massachusetts Bay (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
rrested; but on the doubtful plea that his privilege as a member of parliament had been violated, he was set at liberty by the popular Chief Justice Pratt. The opponents of the ministry hastened to renew the war of privilege against prerogative, with the advantage of being defenders of the constitution on a question affecting a vital principle of personal freedom. The cry for Wilkes and Liberty was heard in all parts of the British dominion. Hutchinson's History of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, III. 163. In the midst of the confusion, Grenville set about confirming himself in power Grenville's Account of himself to Knox. by diligence in the public business. His self-conceit, said Lord Holland afterwards, Lord Holland to George Selwyn. as well as his pride and obstinacy, established him. For the joint secretary of the treasury he selected an able and sensible lawyer, Thomas Whately, in whom he obtained a firm defender and political friend. His own secretary as Ch
North America (search for this): chapter 6
t burthensome and most palatable to the colonies, they can contribute towards the support of the additional expense which must attend their civil and military establishment. Secretary Lord Egremont to the Lords of Trade, 5 May, 1763: North America naturally offers itself as the principal object of your lordship's consideration upon this occasion, with regard to which I shall first obey his majesty's commands in proposing to your lordships some general questions, before I proceed to desire you will furnish that information which his majesty expects from your lordships with regard to the North American and Southern parts of this continent, considered separately. The questions which relate to North America in general, are— 1st. What new governments should be established, and what form should be adopted for such new governments? And where the capital or residence of each governor should be fixed? 2dly. What military establishment will be sufficient? What new forts sh
Halifax (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6
im the lie, applied Grenville, in Knox's Considerations on the Present State of the Nation. 48. to the CHAP. VI.} 1763. April. ministry for the protection to which every Englishman had a right. How to proceed became a question. Grenville, Grenville's Speeches in the House of Commons, 16 December, 1768, and 3 February, 1769, in Wright's Cavendish Debates, i. 110, 160. as a lawyer, knew, and declared that general warrants were illegal; but conforming to long established precedents, Halifax, as one of the secretaries of state, issued a general warrant for the arrest of all concerned in a publication which calm judgment Mahon's History of England, IV. pronounces unworthy of notice, but which all parties at that day branded as a libel. Wilkes was arrested; but on the doubtful plea that his privilege as a member of parliament had been violated, he was set at liberty by the popular Chief Justice Pratt. The opponents of the ministry hastened to renew the war of privilege again
New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
growing weary of his German war, and a majority in the British cabinet opposed his counsels. Newcastle, so long the representative of a cabal of the oligarchy, which had once been more repected thaore changed his associates: entering life as a patriot, accepting office of Newcastle, leaving Newcastle with Pitt, and remaining in office when Pitt and Temple were driven out. The head of his own hn doing more. And when he looked back upon the line of his predecessors in office; upon Bute, Newcastle, Devonshire, Waldegrave, and even Pelham, under whom he had been trained, it was easy for him te to Beford, 2 April, 1763, in Wiffen and Bedford Correspondence. My nephew Charles, reasoned Newcastle, Newcastle to Pitt, 9 April 1763, in Chatham Correspondence, II. 221. will hardly act underNewcastle to Pitt, 9 April 1763, in Chatham Correspondence, II. 221. will hardly act under George Grenville; and it proved so. A sharp rivalry existed between the two, and continued as long as both lived; each of them, in the absence of Pitt, aiming to stand first in the House of Commons,
Cambria (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6
feeble will, and was very obstinate. which never belonged to him. With the bequest of Bute's office, the new minister inherited also the services of his efficient private secretary, Charles Jenkinson, who now became the principal Secretary of the Treasury. He was a man of rare ability. An Oxford scholar without fortune, and at first destined for the Church, he entered life on the side of the whigs; but using an immediate opportunity of becoming known to George the Third while Prince of Wales, he devoted himself to his service. He remained always a friend and a uniform favorite of the king. Engaged in the most important scenes of political action, and rising to the highest stations, he moved with so soft a step, that he seemed to pass on as noiselessly as a shadow; and history was hardly aware of his presence. He had the singular talent of being employed in the most delicate and disagreeable personal negotiations, and fulfilling such trusts so calmly as to retain the friendshi
Fort Bedford (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
, and in the Government. But Townshend, though, for the present, he declined office, took care to retain the favor of the king by zeal against popular commotions. Gilly Williams to George Selwin, in Jesse's George Selwin, i. 189. The Duke of Bedford, too, refused to join the ministry after the advancement of Egremont and Grenville, who, at the time of his negotiating the peace, had shown him so much ill-will. He advised the employment of the old whig aristocracy. I know, said he, the administration cannot last; should I take in it the place of President of the Council, I should deserve to be CHAP. VI.} 1763. April. treated like a madman. Bedford to Bute, Paris, 7 April, 1763, in Wiffen, II. 525, and in Bedford Correspondence, III. 228. So unattractive was Grenville! The triumvirate, of whom not one was beloved by the people, became a general joke, Walpole to Mann, 30 April, 1763. and was laughed at as a three-headed monster, Wilkes to Lord Temple, in Grenville Pa
Grafton, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
the nation, nor either house of parliament, was willing he should hold. In the midst of changing factions the British constitution stood like adamant. Grenville, who was never personally agreeable to the king, Autobiography of the Duke of Grafton: There may be good reason for believing that his [George Grenville's] manners were never agreeable to His Majesty. 34. was chosen to succeed Bute in the ministry, because, from his position, he seemed dependent on the court. He had no party, aille was very ignorant as to the colonies we have a witness in Knox, who himself had held office in Georgia, and knew America from his own observation. of the colonies, yet his intentions were fair; The best in the world. Burke and the Duke of Grafton both vouch for Grenville's good intentions. for Jackson was a liberal member of the House of Commons, a good lawyer, not eager to increase his affluent fortune, frank, independent, and abhorring intrigue. He was, moreover, better acquainted wit
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
, yet his intentions were fair; The best in the world. Burke and the Duke of Grafton both vouch for Grenville's good intentions. for Jackson was a liberal member of the House of Commons, a good lawyer, not eager to increase his affluent fortune, frank, independent, and abhorring intrigue. He was, moreover, better acquainted with the state of America, and exercised a sounder judgment on questions of colonial administration, than, perhaps, any man in England. His excellent character led Connecticut and Pennsylvania to make him their agent; and he gave the latter province even better advice than Franklin himself. He was always able to combine affection for England with uprightness and fidelity to his American employers. To a mind like Grenville's, the protective system had irresistible attractions. He saw in trade the foundation of the wealth and power of his country, and embraced all the prejudices of the mercantile system; he wished by regulations and control to advance the co
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6
a special reference to America. It was not the wish of this man or that man; Speech of Cornwall, brother-in-law of Charles Jenkinson, in the House of Commons, in Cavendish Debates, i. 91. each house of parliament, and nearly every body in Great Britain, was eager to throw a part of the public burdens on the increasing opulence of the New World. The new ministry, at the outset, was weakened by its own indiscreet violence. In the speech at the close of the session, the king vauntingly arrrevenue, was his second great object. This he combined with the purpose M. Frances au Due de Choiseul à Londres le 2 Septembre, 1768. of so dividing the public burdens between England and America as to diminish the motive to emigrate from Great Britain and Ireland; Second protest of the House of Lords, on the repeal of the stamp act. for, in those days, emigration Knox, i. 23, Extra-official Papers, II. 23. was considered an evil. In less than a month after Bute's retirement, Egremon
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