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Moab (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ns of a few traders, and a fort with a garrison of about forty Captain Etherington to Major Gladwin, Michilimackinac, 12 June, 1763. Etherington's account, contemporary and official, reports but thirty-five privates. souls. Savages had arrived near it, as if to trade and beg for presents. From day to day, the Chippewas, who dwelt in a plain near the fort, assembled to play ball. On the second day of June, Yet, on the second instant—Capt. Etherington.—Henry's Travels and Adventures in Canada and the Indian Territories, between the years 1760 and 1776. The author in his old age prepared this interesting work for press, and gave it to the public in October 1809. He makes the garrison consist of ninety; he gives the game of ball as on the king's birth-day; and makes it a trial of skill between the Sacs and Chippewas. These incidents heighten the romance of the story; but I think it better to stoop to truth, and follow the authentic contemporary account. The letter of Etheringto
Edge Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
terly routed and cut to pieces but for the cool behavior of the troops and the excellent conduct of the officers. Col. Bouquet to Sir Jeffery Amherst: Camp at Edge Hill, 5 Aug. 1763. Night intervened, during which the English re- chap. VII.} 1763. Aug. mained on Edge Hill, a ridge a mile to the east of Bushy Run, commodious foEdge Hill, a ridge a mile to the east of Bushy Run, commodious for a camp except for the total want of water. All that night hope cheered the Red Men. Morning dawned only to show the English party that they were beleaguered round on every side. They could not advance to give battle; for then their convoy and their wounded men would have fallen a prey to the enemy: if they remained quiet, the put to flight. But Bouquet in the two actions lost, in killed and wounded, about one-fourth of his men, Return of killed and wounded in the two actions at Edge Hill, near Bushy Run, the 5th and 6th August, 1763: total killed, 50; wounded, 60; missing, 5. Total of the whole, 115. and almost all his horses; so that he was obl
Carlisle, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
latter of 133, officers included, which will march this evening. Amherst to Bouquet, 23 June, 1763. who, having been wasted by the enfeebling service of the West Indies, were now to brave the danger of mountain passes and a slow and painful journey through the wilderness. He moved onwards with but about five hundred men, driving a hundred beeves and twice that number of sheep, with powder, flour, and provisions on pack-horses and in wagons chap. VII.} 1763. July. drawn by oxen. Between Carlisle and Bedford they passed the ruins of mills, deserted cabins, fields waving with the harvest, but without a reaper, and all the signs of a savage and ruthless enemy. On the twenty-eighth of July the party left Bedford, to wind its way, under the parching suns of midsummer, over the Alleghanies, along the narrow road, which was walled in by the dense forest on either side. On the second day of August the troops and con- Aug. voy arrived at Ligonier, but the commander could give no intell
Niagara County (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
conquerors, and here and there in the solitudes, all the way from Niagara to the Falls of the St. Mary and the banks of the St. Joseph's, a Captain Ourry, in June, 1763. until every Where, from the falls of Niagara and the piny declivities of the Alleghanies to the whitewood foresn the lakes saw at least the water course which would take them to Niagara. Fort Miami was deep in the forest, out of sight and hearing of cath-cry of the Indians announced that the English party, sent from Niagara to reinforce Detroit, had, two nights previously, just before midnuth of Detroit River, and utterly defeated, a part turning back to Niagara, the larger part falling into the hands of the savages. Lieutenle, now Erie, was the point of communication between Pittsburg and Niagara and Detroit. It was in itself one of the most tenable, and had a Neyon a Kerlerec, 1 Dec. 1763. Return of the killed, wounded and missing in the action on the carrying-place, at Niagara, 14 Sept. 1763.
Ottowa (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ming, &c. and took such precautions that the interview passed off without results. Pontiac was allowed, perhaps unwisely, to escape. On the morning of the same day, an English party who were sounding the entrance of Lake Huron were seized and murdered. Amherst to Gladwin. On the eighth, Pontiac ap- Weyman's New-York Gazette, 11 July, 1763, No. 239, 3 1. Glad win to Amherst. peared once more with a pipe of peace, proposing to chap VII.} 1763. May. come the next day, with the whole Ottawa nation to renew his friendship. But on the afternoon of the ninth, he struck his tent, began hostilities, and strictly beleaguered the garrison, which had not on hand provisions enough for three weeks. The first man that shall bring them provisions, or any thing else, shall suffer death. Such was Pontiac's proclamation of the blockade of Detroit. On the tenth there was a parley, and the garrison was summoned to capitulate to the Red Men as the French had done to the English. Not till aft
Detroit River (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
r of the 60th Regiment, who was one of the garrison. On the thirtieth of May the besieged garrison of chap. VII.} 1763. May. Detroit caught a hope of relief, as they saw a fleet of boats sweeping round the point. They flocked to the bastions to welcome their friends; but the death-cry of the Indians announced that the English party, sent from Niagara to reinforce Detroit, had, two nights previously, just before midnight, been attacked in their camp, on the beach, near the mouth of Detroit River, and utterly defeated, a part turning back to Niagara, the larger part falling into the hands of the savages. Lieutenant Cuyler's Report of his being attacked and routed by a party of Indians on Lake Erie. Major Wilkins to Sir Jeffery Amherst, Niagara, 6 June, 1763. At eight o'clock in the night of the last day of June. May, the war belt reached the Indian village near Fort Ouatanon, just below Lafayette, in Indiana; the next morning the commander was lured into an Indian cabin a
Fort Niagara (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e their friends; but the death-cry of the Indians announced that the English party, sent from Niagara to reinforce Detroit, had, two nights previously, just before midnight, been attacked in their camp, on the beach, near the mouth of Detroit River, and utterly defeated, a part turning back to Niagara, the larger part falling into the hands of the savages. Lieutenant Cuyler's Report of his being attacked and routed by a party of Indians on Lake Erie. Major Wilkins to Sir Jeffery Amherst, Niagara, 6 June, 1763. At eight o'clock in the night of the last day of June. May, the war belt reached the Indian village near Fort Ouatanon, just below Lafayette, in Indiana; the next morning the commander was lured into an Indian cabin and bound, and his garrison surrendered. The French, moving the victors to clemency by gifts of wampum, Lieutenant Jenkins to Major Gladwin, Ouatanon, 1 June, 1763. received the prisoners into their houses. At Michilimackinac, a spot of two acres on the
West Indies (search for this): chapter 7
July, when they vanished from sight. Bouquet was at that time making his way to relieve Fort Pitt and reinforce Detroit. His little army consisted chiefly of the remains of two regiments of Highlanders, I have therefore ordered the remains of the 42d and 77th regiment, the first consisting of 214 men, including officers, and the latter of 133, officers included, which will march this evening. Amherst to Bouquet, 23 June, 1763. who, having been wasted by the enfeebling service of the West Indies, were now to brave the danger of mountain passes and a slow and painful journey through the wilderness. He moved onwards with but about five hundred men, driving a hundred beeves and twice that number of sheep, with powder, flour, and provisions on pack-horses and in wagons chap. VII.} 1763. July. drawn by oxen. Between Carlisle and Bedford they passed the ruins of mills, deserted cabins, fields waving with the harvest, but without a reaper, and all the signs of a savage and ruthless
Venango (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
post at Presqua Isle. The capitulation at Erie left Le Boeuf without hope. Attacked on the eighteenth, its gallant officer kept off the enemy till midnight. The Indians then succeeded in setting the blockhouse on fire; but he .escaped secretly, with his garrison, into the woods, Ensign Price to Col. Bouquet, 26 June, 1763. while the enemy believed them all buried in the flames. Weyman's New-York Gazette, 11 July, 239, 3, 1. As the fugitives, on their way to Fort Pitt, passed Venango, they saw nothing but ruins. The fort at that place was consumed, never to be rebuilt; and not one of its garrison was left alive to tell the story of its destruction. Captain Ecuyer to Colonel Bouquet, Fort Pitt, 26 June, 1763. Ensign Price to Bouquet, 26 June, 1763. Nor was it the garrisoned stockades only that encountered the fury of the savages. They roamed the wilderness, massacring all whom they met. They struck down more than a hundreds Letter from Fort Pitt of 16 June, 1
Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
t Chartres;—do not desert thy children: the English shall never come here so long as a red man lives. Our hearts, they repeated, are with the French; we hate the English, and wish to kill them all. We are all united: the war is our war, and we will continue it for seven years. The English shall never come into the west. Neyon to Kerlerec, December 1, 1763. But the French officers in Illinois, though their efforts were for a long time unavailing, sincerely desired to execute the treaty of Paris with loyalty. On the sixteenth of May, a party of Indians appeared at the gate of the fort of Sandusky. Ensign Paulli, the commander, ordered seven of them—four Hurons and three Ottawas—to be admitted as old acquaintances and friends. They sat smoking, till one of them raised his head as a signal, on which the two that were next Paulli seized and tied him fast without uttering a word. As they carried him out of the room, he saw the dead body of his sentry. The rest of the garrison lay<
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