hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Grenville 521 1 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 222 0 Browse Search
1763 AD 185 185 Browse Search
William Pitt 182 0 Browse Search
1765 AD 158 158 Browse Search
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) 128 0 Browse Search
Hutchinson 125 3 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 110 0 Browse Search
Charles Townshend 103 1 Browse Search
James Otis 92 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 673 total hits in 174 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
, King George the Second, who thanked me for advising him to it. Grenville's Diary, in Papers, 191. Hardwicke, in Harris, Grenville III. 372. Walpole, in his Reign of George III., i. 285, mixing fiction with fact. The wise answer of the illustrious jurist was reported to the king, who, disregarding the most earnest chap. VIII.} 1763 Aug. dissuasions of Grenville, desired ten days for reflection, on which Grenville went into the country to await the decision. But on Wednesday, the third, Halifax, with Egremont at his side, harangued the king for half an hour, pressing him, on the instant, to resolve either to support his administration or to form another from their adversaries. Halifax turned this in all the ways that eloquence could dictate or invent, yet without extorting any answer whatever; and when he said, that surely the king could not mean to take into his service the whole body of the opposition and yield to the invasion of those he had detested, the usual disclai
e, Rockingham, and Hardwicke Hardwicke in Harris, III. 379. to come to London as his council. From his own point of view, there was no unreasonableness W. Gerard Hamilton in Chatham Cor. II. 378. in his demands. But to the court it seemed otherwise. On Sunday evening Grenville found the king in the greatest agitation. Rather than submit to the hard terms proposed by Pitt, said he, I would die in the room I now stand in. Grenville Papers, II. 197. Early in the morning of the twenty-ninth, Bute, through Beckford, urged Pitt to be content with filling up the places of the two Secretaries of State, and putting a neutral person at the head of the Treasury, in- chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. stead of Lord Temple. Grenville's Diary, in Grenville Papers, II. 202. The message was an announcement to Pitt that his system was rejected; and the great commoner stood forewarned in the presence of his sovereign. The audience lasted nearly two hours. The king proposed Halifax for the Trea
s no longer Secretary of State, nor Shelburne at the head of the Board of Trade. The triumvirate ministry, the three Horatii, the ministerial Cerberus, Wilkes to Temple, 26 July. Grenville Papers, II. 81. as they were called, al- chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. though too fond of office to perceive their own weakness, had neither popularity, nor weight in parliament, nor the favor of the court. To strengthen his government, the king, conforming to the views sketched by Bute in the previous April, Bute to Bedford, 2 April, 1763: I once gone, it will be very hard for me to believe that the Duke of Newcastle will, with Lord Hardwicke, &c. continue a violent or peevish opposition, &c &c. Bedford Cor. III. 226. but against the positive and repeated advice Grenville's Diary, in Grenville Papers, II. 191. of his three ministers, directed Egremont to invite Lord Hardwicke to enter the cabinet, as President of the Council. It is impossible for me, said Hardwicke, at an interview on
resent, for the use of the Indians. and the plan of intimidating America by a military colony at its north and west was deferred. With regard to the mode of revenue least burthensome and most palatable to the colonies, whereby they were to contribute to the additional expense which must attend the civil and military establishments adopted on the present occasion, Shelburne gave warning that it was a point of the highest im- chap. VIII.} 1763. July. portance, Lords of Trade to Egremont, 8 June (E. and A., 275), 1763. and declined to implicate himself in the plans for taxing America. Grenville Diary, Tuesday, 13 Dec., 1763; Grenville Papers, II. 238: He (Henley) told him (G. G.) that the king had told his lordship, in the sumner, that upon occasion of some disputes between Lord Egremont and Lord Shelburne, relating to the Board of Trade, Lord Mansfield had given it as his advice to his Majesty, to show favor to Lord Shelburne, in order to play them one against the other, and by
st attend the civil and military establishments adopted on the present occasion, Shelburne gave warning that it was a point of the highest im- chap. VIII.} 1763. July. portance, Lords of Trade to Egremont, 8 June (E. and A., 275), 1763. and declined to implicate himself in the plans for taxing America. Grenville Diary, Tueaggerated accounts given by the officers who had been employed in America, dispelled every doubt of its ability to bear a part in the national chap. VIII.} 1763. July. expenses. Reed's Reed, i. 32. Halifax, one of the triumvirate, had had the experience of nine years in administering the affairs of the colonies, and for nearlce in 1762, Knox, who looked up to Ellis, put into Bute's hands a plan for reducing America. He also renewed the proposition which he had made chap. VIII.} 1763. July. eight years before to Halifax, for gaining an imperial revenue by issuing exchequer bills for the general use of America. But before the bill for the American ta
July 26th (search for this): chapter 8
e's hands a plan for reducing America. He also renewed the proposition which he had made chap. VIII.} 1763. July. eight years before to Halifax, for gaining an imperial revenue by issuing exchequer bills for the general use of America. But before the bill for the American tax was ordered to be prepared, Egremont was no longer Secretary of State, nor Shelburne at the head of the Board of Trade. The triumvirate ministry, the three Horatii, the ministerial Cerberus, Wilkes to Temple, 26 July. Grenville Papers, II. 81. as they were called, al- chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. though too fond of office to perceive their own weakness, had neither popularity, nor weight in parliament, nor the favor of the court. To strengthen his government, the king, conforming to the views sketched by Bute in the previous April, Bute to Bedford, 2 April, 1763: I once gone, it will be very hard for me to believe that the Duke of Newcastle will, with Lord Hardwicke, &c. continue a violent or peevish o
1. as they were called, al- chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. though too fond of office to perceive their own the letter refers to the conversation held in August. to accept an employment, whilst all my friendisregarding the most earnest chap. VIII.} 1763 Aug. dissuasions of Grenville, desired ten days for the one side, and the Duke chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. of Bedford Geo. Grenville's Diary, in Grenri The anger of Bedford towards Bute, for having Aug. communicated to the French minister the instrucrenville Papers, II. 193. I chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. have fully considered upon your long discourse that they made a parade of chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. proscribing him, and wished not only to deprived me faithfully and devoted chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. themselves to me The reproach, answered Pitt, w after his long and anxious chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. suspense, was called in, he could think only ofe head of the Treasury, in- chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. stead of Lord Temple. Grenville's Diary, in
August 1st (search for this): chapter 8
o Bedford, 2 April, 1763: I once gone, it will be very hard for me to believe that the Duke of Newcastle will, with Lord Hardwicke, &c. continue a violent or peevish opposition, &c &c. Bedford Cor. III. 226. but against the positive and repeated advice Grenville's Diary, in Grenville Papers, II. 191. of his three ministers, directed Egremont to invite Lord Hardwicke to enter the cabinet, as President of the Council. It is impossible for me, said Hardwicke, at an interview on the first day of August, The date of Newcastle's letter, in Albemarle's Memoirs of Rockingham, i. 169, is given as of June 30, 1763, a mistake, for the letter refers to the conversation held in August. to accept an employment, whilst all my friends are out of court. Hardwicke to his son, 5 August, 1763, in Harris, 370. The king, said Egremont, cannot bring himself to submit to take in a party in gross, or an opposition party. A king of England, answered Hardwicke, at the head of a popular government,
August 10th (search for this): chapter 8
Papers, II. 83, 84. Egremont was ready to concert with Grenville how to maintain themselves in office in spite of the king's wishes, by employing absolute necessity and fear. Egremont to Grenville, 6 Aug. 1763, in Grenville Papers, II. 88. It is not strange that the discerning king wished to be rid of Egremont. To that end Shelburne, who was opposed to Egremont's schemes of colonial government, was commissioned to propose a coalition between Pitt and Temple Calcraft to Lord Temple, 10 August, and Temple to Calcraft, 12 August, 1763, in the Grenville Papers, II. 90, 91. on the one side, and the Duke chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. of Bedford Geo. Grenville's Diary, in Grenrille Papers, II. 204. on the other. The anger of Bedford towards Bute, for having Aug. communicated to the French minister the instructions given him during his embassy, had ripened into a stiff, irrevocable hatred. He was therefore willing to enter the ministry Note by Grenville to his Diary, in Grenville
August 19th (search for this): chapter 8
inconsistent with his declared opinions and his engagements with the great Whig families Rigby to the Duke of Bedford, 15 August, 1763, in Wiffen, II. 527, and Bedford Cor., II. 236. in opposition. So ended the attempt to supersede Egremont by Pitt, with Bedford in the vacant chair of President of the Council. For a day or two the king hesitated, and had to endure the very long and tedious speeches of Grenville on the inconvenience of sacrificing his ministry. Grenville's Diary, 19 August, Grenville Papers, II. 193. I chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. have fully considered upon your long discourse on the Friday said he to his minister on Sunday the twentyfirst; by your advice I mean to conduct myself. It is necessary to restrain the licentiousness of the times; if I suffer force to be put upon me by the opposition, the mob will try to govern me next; Geo. Grenville's Diary, Sunday, 21 August, in Grenville Papers, II. 193. and he decided to stand by the ministry. But, just at
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...