hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Grenville 521 1 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 222 0 Browse Search
1763 AD 185 185 Browse Search
William Pitt 182 0 Browse Search
1765 AD 158 158 Browse Search
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) 128 0 Browse Search
Hutchinson 125 3 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 110 0 Browse Search
Charles Townshend 103 1 Browse Search
James Otis 92 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 673 total hits in 174 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ville, for he never called him by his right name. Whether Pitt, who had himself attained a kind of royalty, and was ever mindful to support his own majesty, Lyttelton to Royston, in Phillimore, II. 646. pleased himself with seeing the great Whig families at his heels; or, which is more probable, aware that the actual ministry could not go on, was himself deceived by his own presumptuously hopeful nature into a belief that those who made the overture must carry it through, he summoned Newcastle, Devonshire, Rockingham, and Hardwicke Hardwicke in Harris, III. 379. to come to London as his council. From his own point of view, there was no unreasonableness W. Gerard Hamilton in Chatham Cor. II. 378. in his demands. But to the court it seemed otherwise. On Sunday evening Grenville found the king in the greatest agitation. Rather than submit to the hard terms proposed by Pitt, said he, I would die in the room I now stand in. Grenville Papers, II. 197. Early in the morni
Westminster (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
t's note to Walpole's Memoirs, i. 287. became unappeasable; and he never forgave him the advice. It was the interest of Bute to see Pitt at the head of affairs, for Pitt alone had opposed him as a minister without animosity towards him as a man. They who had sided with him when in power, now so dreaded to share his unpopularity, that they made a parade of chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. proscribing him, and wished not only to deprive him of influence, but to exile him from the court and from Westminster. He, therefore desired, and long ugcontinued to desire, to see Pitt in office, of whose personal magnanimity he was sure. The wish was inconsistent with the politics of the times; but the moment was one when parties in England, though soon to be consolidated, were as yet in a nebulous state, and very many of the time-serving public men, even Charles Townshend himself, were entirely at fault. The real option lay between a government by the more liberal aristocracy under popular influenc
Sandwich, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Grenville's Diary, 197, 199; to Hertford in Walpole's George III. i. 291; to Sandwich, in Sandwich to Bedford, and in Bedford to Neville, in Bedford Cor. III. 238, Sandwich to Bedford, and in Bedford to Neville, in Bedford Cor. III. 238, 241. For Pitt's account to Wood, see Wood's Letter, in the Chatham Correspondence; to Hardwicke, in Hardwicke to Royston, Harris III. 377, 380; to the House of Commo attachment. At the same time Bedford doubly irritated at being proscribed Sandwich to Bedford, 5 Sept. 1763, in Bedford Cor. III. 238. Walpole's George III. i.us and powerful connection, to support the present system in all its parts. Sandwich to Grenville, 3 Sept. 1763. Grenville's Diary, Grenville Papers, II. 108, 203pare, also, Bedford to Neville, 5 Sept. 1763. Bedford Cor. III. 240, 241; and Sandwich to Bedford 5 Sept. 1763. Bedford Cor. III. 238. The king entreated him to tak Bute had gone into retreat, under the influence of his friends, especially of Sandwich who became Secretary of State, accepted the post which was pressed upon him.
Hertford, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ous and criminal; and to declare that the Duke of Bedford should have no efficient office whatever. He would restore to the king's council the men of the great Whig families, who, like himself, had been driven from power, yet not as a party to triumph over the prerogative. The king preserved his self-possession, combated several of these demands, said now and then that his honor must be consulted, For the king's account of this interview to Grenville, in Grenville's Diary, 197, 199; to Hertford in Walpole's George III. i. 291; to Sandwich, in Sandwich to Bedford, and in Bedford to Neville, in Bedford Cor. III. 238, 241. For Pitt's account to Wood, see Wood's Letter, in the Chatham Correspondence; to Hardwicke, in Hardwicke to Royston, Harris III. 377, 380; to the House of Commons, in Walpole, i. 318, 319, and in several contemporary letters, containing the accounts of the debates. and reserved his decision till a second interview. Charles Townshend to Temple, 11 Sept. 1763, i
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 8
ed at the head of the Board of Trade. One and the same spirit was at work on each side of the Atlantic. From Boston Bernard urged anew the establishment of a sufficient and independent civil list—out of which enlarged salaries were to be paid to the crown officers. And while he acknowledged that the compact between the king and the people was in no colony better observed than in that of the Massachusetts Bay, that its people in general were well satisfied with their subordination to Great Britain, that their former prejudices which made them otherwise disposed, were wholly or almost wholly worn off, he nevertheless railed at the unfortunate error in framing the government, to leave the council to be elected annually. He advised either a council resembling as near as possible the House of Lords; its members to be appointed for life, with some title, as Baronet or Baron, composed of people of conse- chap. VIII.} 1763. Sept. quence, willing to look up to the king for honor and au
Egremont (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ons were insulting, uncivil, and impertinent. Instead of hastily resigning, Geo. Grenville to Egremont, 4 August, 1763, in Grenville Papers, II. 83, 84. Egremont was ready to concert with Grenville how to maintain themselves in office in spite of the king's wishes, by employing absolute necessity and fear. Egremont to Grenville, 6 Aug. 1763, in Grenville Papers, II. 88. It is not strange that the discerning king wished to be rid of Egremont. To that end Shelburne, who was opposed to Egremont's schemes of colonial government, was commissioned to propose a coalition between Pitt and Temple Calcraft to Lord Temple, 10 August, and Temple to Calcraft, 12 August, 1763, in the Grenville Papers, II. 90, 91. on the one side, and the Duke chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. of Bedford Geo. Grenville's Diary, in Grenrille Papers, II. 204. on the other. The anger of Bedford towards Bute, for having Aug. communicated to the French minister the instructions given him during his embassy, had r
Walpole (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
t to the stamp act, after having formally declined giving any other advice on the subject, excepting that I had always given, to lay the project aside. his Secretary as Chancellor of the Exchequer, advised him to lay the project aside, and refused to take any part in preparing or supporting it. But Jenkinson, his Secretary of the Treasury, was ready to render every assistance, and weighed more than the honest chap. VIII.} 1763 Sept. and independent Jackson. Grenville therefore adopted Walpole's Geo. III., III. 32: Grenville adopted, from Lord Bute, a plan of taxation formed by Jenkinson. the measure which was devolved upon him, and his memory must consent, as he himself consented, that it should be christened by his name. Grenville, in Cavendish. It was certainly Grenville, who first brought this scheme into form. Burke's Speech on American taxation, Works, i. 460. He doubted the propriety of taxing colonies, without allowing them representatives; Knox: Extra-official S
Fort Bedford (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ide, and the Duke chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. of Bedford Geo. Grenville's Diary, in Grenrille Papers, II. 204. on the other. The anger of Bedford towards Bute, for having Aug. communicated to thee great Whig families Rigby to the Duke of Bedford, 15 August, 1763, in Wiffen, II. 527, and Bedtion and rage. His anger towards the Duke of Bedford Sir Denis Le Marchant's note to Walpole's and criminal; and to declare that the Duke of Bedford should have no efficient office whatever. Herge III. i. 291; to Sandwich, in Sandwich to Bedford, and in Bedford to Neville, in Bedford Cor. IBedford to Neville, in Bedford Cor. III. 238, 241. For Pitt's account to Wood, see Wood's Letter, in the Chatham Correspondence; to Har irritated at being proscribed Sandwich to Bedford, 5 Sept. 1763, in Bedford Cor. III. 238. Walenville Papers, II. 108, 203. Compare, also, Bedford to Neville, 5 Sept. 1763. Bedford Cor. III. 240, 241; and Sandwich to Bedford 5 Sept. 1763. Bedford Cor. III. 238. The king entreated him to t[3 more...]
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
of Bernard to the British government. Answer of Francis Bernard, 1763. Esq., Governor of Massachusetts 423. Bay, to the queries proposed by the Lords Commissioners for Trade and State, Plantations; dated 5 September, King's Library, Mss. CCV. Compare on the loyalty of Massachusetts, Bernard to Sec. of 16 Feb. 1763, and same to same, 25 Oct. 1763. On the extension of the British frontientest with indifference; but Colden now urged the Board of Trade to annex to New-York all of Massachusetts and of New-Hampshire west of the Connecticut River. The New-England Governments, he reasoned1763. Little was the issue of this fatal advice chap. VIII.} 1763. Sept. foreseen. While Massachusetts was in danger of an essential violation of its charter with regard to one branch of its legiof Georgia, stood ready to defend the stamp act, as least liable to objection. The agent of Massachusetts, through his brother, Israel Mauduit, who had Jenkinson for his fast friend and often saw Gr
West Indies (search for this): chapter 8
oduce sixty thousand pounds per annum, and twice that sum if extended to the West Indies. Henry McCulloh to Charles Jenkinson, Turnham Green, 5 July, 1763, in a nted agent to the province of North Carolina by the Assembly [see America and West Indies, vol. 198], but the resolve, to which Governor Tryon had no objection, dropp imposing proper stamp duties upon his majesty's subjects in America and the West Indies. C. Jenkinson to the Commissioners of Stamps. Letter Book, XXII. p. 432: imposing proper Stamp Duties upon His Majesty's Subjects in America and the West Indies. I am, &c. C. Jenkinson.—23 Sept. 1763. Who was the author of the Ameribecause it would occasion less expense of officers, and would include the West India Islands; Grenville, in the House of Commons, in the debate of 5 March, 1770: Futy, as it would occasion less expense of officers, and would include the West India islands. Gordon's History of the American Revolution, i. 158. and speaking for h
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...