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Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
is newly created office. Johnson, the faithful agent of Connecticut, a churchman, and one who from his heart wished to avoidvancement. W. S. Johnson to W. Pitkin, 13 Feb. 1768. Connecticut, declared Hillsborough, may always Chap. XXXI.} 1768. Jan. depend upon my friendship and affection. Connecticut, said Johnson, is a loyal Colony. You are a very free Colony, reit as really, though not as extensively as the Colony of Connecticut. Since, therefore, no question can be made of the rightestion made upon the validity of such a grant as that to Connecticut in the day of it, yet Parliament as well as the Crown haw in question is conversant. If the General Assembly of Connecticut should make a law flatly contradictory to the statute of for two hours together, they reasoned on the rights of Connecticut; and Hillsborough showed Chap. XXXI.} 1768. Jan. plainlause the people by the enjoyment of it were too free. Connecticut so united caution with patriotism, that successive Briti
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 8
e Chap. XXXI.} 1768. Jan. Minister a sense of shame. It was this use of the new revenue which the reflecting people in Boston particularly abhorred. We shall be obliged, said they, to maintain in luxury sycophants, court parasites and hungry dependents, who will be sent over to watch and oppress those who support them. Andrew Eliot to T. Hollis, 10 Dec. 1767; and compare A. Eliot to Archdeacon Blackburne, 15 Dec. 1767. If large salaries are given, needy poor lawyers from England and Scotland, or some tools of power of our own, will be placed on the bench. The Governors will be men rewarded for despicable services, hackneyed in deceit and avarice; or some noble scoundrel who has spent his fortune in every kind of debauchery. Unreasonable impositions tend to alienate the hearts of the Colonists. Our growth is so great, in a few years Britain will not be able to compel our submission. Who thought that the four little Provinces of Holland would have been able to throw off the
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 8
s of Boston to set on foot manufactures and to cease importations. W. S. Johnson to R. Temple, 12 Feb. 1767. Franklin to W. Franklin, 19 Dec. 1767. The Americans, it was said with acrimony, are determined to have as little connection with Great Britain as possible; N. Rogers to Hutchinson, London, 30 Dec. 1766. and the moment they can, they will renounce dependence. W. S. Johnson to Governor Pitkin, 26 Dec, 1766. The partisans of the new Ministers professed to think it desirable thathin that proviso or not; this must be decided by a court of law having jurisdiction of the matter, about which the law in question is conversant. If the General Assembly of Connecticut should make a law flatly contradictory to the statute of Great Britain, it may be void; but a declaration of the King in Council would still make it neither more nor less so, but be as void as the law itself, for other words in the Charter clearly and expressly exclude them from deciding about it. I have not
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
me to the conclusion, to which he might have been led, on becoming convinced that such a union was impossible. In 1768 it still had many advocates in England and in America, Otis among the number. that an American representation was impossible, yet his heart still turned to his original opinion, and in his prevailing mood, he shrunk from the thought of Independence. The ruling passion of Samuel Adams, on the contrary, was the preservation of the distinctive character and institutions of New-England. He thoroughly understood the tendency of the measures adopted by Chap. XXXI.} 1768. Jan. Parliament; approved of making the appeal to Heaven, since freedom could not otherwise be preserved; and valued the liberties of his country more than its temporal prosperity, more than his own life, more than the lives of all. The confidence of his townsmen sustained his fortitude; his whole nature was absorbed by care for the public; and his strictly logical mind was led to choose for the defenc
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 31: Massachusetts Consults her sister Colonies.—Hillsbo-rough's Administration of the Colonies. November, 1767—February, 1768. on the twenty-fourth of November, the Twelfth Chap. XXXI.} 1767. Nov. Parliament came together for the last time, previous to its dissolution. Its members were too busy in preparing for the coming elections to interfere with America, about which the King's speech was silent; Garth to South Carolina, 25 Nov. 1767. and when Grenville descanted on two or three papers in the Boston Gazette, as infamous libels on Parliament, the House showed only weariness of his complaints. W. S. Johnson to Gov. Pitkin, 26 Dec. 1767. W. S. Johnson to Jared Ingersoll, 30 Nov. 1767. Franklin to Galloway, 1 Dec. 1767, in Works, VII. 369. N. Rogers to Hutchinson, 30 Dec. 1767. Miscellaneous letters ascribed to Junius, x. XXIX. and XXXI. in Bohm's edition, II. 146, 193, 199. Bedford himself objected to Grenville's Test for America; Lyttelton to Temple
Fort Bedford (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
, in Works, VII. 369. N. Rogers to Hutchinson, 30 Dec. 1767. Miscellaneous letters ascribed to Junius, x. XXIX. and XXXI. in Bohm's edition, II. 146, 193, 199. Bedford himself objected to Grenville's Test for America; Lyttelton to Temple, in Lyttelton, 741. and preferred making an example of some one seditious fellow. The Ki a hack, than for a gentleman, Grenville Papers, IV. 184. he proceeded to construct a Ministry that would be disunited and docile. On the fifth of December, Bedford, now almost Dec. blind and near his end, just before the removal of cataracts from his eyes, told Grenville, that his age, his infirmities and his tastes disinclll as the most malignant against America; while Rigby was made Vice-Treasurer of Ireland, till he could get the Pay-Office. All five were friends of the Duke of Bedford, and united re- Chap. XXXI.} 1767. Dec. specting America in one opinion, which it was pretended Grafton also had accepted. Israel Mauduit to Hutchinson, 15 De
Chatham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ple, in Lyttelton, 741. and preferred making an example of some one seditious fellow. The King kept the Ministry from breaking, and proved himself the most efficient man among them. He makes each of them, said Mansfield, Lyttelton to Temple, 25 Nov. 1767; Lyttelton, 737. believe that he is in love with him, and fools them all. They will stand their ground, he added, unless that mad man, Lord Chatham, should come and Chap. XXXI.} 1767. Nov. throw a fire-ball in the midst of them. But Chatham's long illness Compare Durand to Choiseul, 23 Nov. 1767. had for the time overthrown his powers. When his health began to give out, it was his passion to appear possessed of the unbounded confidence of the King. A morbid restlessness now led him to great and extravagant expense, in which he vied with those who were no more than his equals in the peerage, but who were besides the inheritors of vast estates. He would drive out with ten outriders, and with two carriages, each drawn by si
Grafton, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
k so large a part in framing the Stamp Act, held a place with Lord North at the Treasury Board. In him, boasted Mauduit to his client, Hutchinson, we have gained a fresh accession in strength. I. Mauduit to Hutchinson, 10 Dec. 1767. He is my fast friend, and has never yet failed me in any thing which he undertook for me. He empowered me to tell you he will make your affair one of his first concerns. Jenkinson, whose noiseless industry exercised a prevailing influence over the neglect of Grafton and the ease of Lord North, formed the active and confidential bond between the Treasury and the office holders in Boston. They of Massachusetts, wrote Mauduit, may be brought to repent of their insolence. To assert and maintain the authority of Parliament over America, was the principle on which the friends of Bedford entered the Ministry. Their anger Durand to Choiseul, 11 December, 1767. was quickened by the resolutions of Boston to set on foot manufactures and to cease importati
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 31: Massachusetts Consults her sister Colonies.—Hillsbo-rough's Administration of the Coloniesasury and the office holders in Boston. They of Massachusetts, wrote Mauduit, may be brought to repent of theiinacy and deceit. His first action respecting Massachusetts was marked by duplicity. Hutchinson, through Mathe biography of Eliot, attribute generally many Massachusetts State Papers to the pen of Samuel Adams, but theorld, as expressing the unchangeable opinions of Massachusetts. Disclaiming the most distant thought of indince in England, January 12, 1768, in Bradford's Massachusetts State papers, 124. that the British constitution of God and nature are invariable. Bradford's Massachusetts State papers, 133. The House of Representati they recounted the story of the colonization of Massachusetts; the forfeiture of their first Charter; and the } 1768. Feb. be thought necessary. Bradford's Massachusetts State Papers, 134. A fair copy of this Circu
Chatham (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 8
dominions, there should be a free legislative; otherwise strange effects are to be apprehended, for the laws of God and nature are invariable. Bradford's Massachusetts State papers, 133. The House of Representatives, having sanctioned Chap XXXI.} 1768. Jan. this Remonstrance, next addressed Shelburne, The House of Representatives to Shelburne, 15 January, 1768, Bradford's State Papers, 137. Compare the contrary opinions of Otis, in Gordon's Hist. of the Amer. Rev. i. 228, 229. Chatham, Rockingham, House to Rockingham, 22 Jan. 1768, in Bradford, 142. Conway, Camden, the Treasury Board, at which sat Grafton, Lord North, and Jenkinson, letters which contained the same sentiments, and especially enforced the impracticability of an American representation in the British Parliament. The True Sentiments of America: Contained in a Collection of Letters, &c. &c. Published at the instance of Thomas Hollis. But no memorial was sent to the Lords; no petition to the House of Co
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