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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Clinch River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
f 1773, Daniel Boone would have taken his wife and children to Kentucky. At Powell's valley, he was joined by five families and forty men. On or near the tenth of October, as they approached Cumberland Gap, the young men who had charge of the pack-horses and cattle in the rear, were suddenly attacked by Indians; one only escaped; the remaining six, among whom was Boone's eldest son, were killed on the spot; so that the survivors of the party were forced to turn back to the settlements on Clinch river. When the Cherokees were summoned from Virginia to give up the offenders, they shifted the accusation from one tribe to another, and the application for redress had no effect; but one of those who had escaped, murdered an Indian at a horse race on the frontier, notwithstanding the interposition of all around. This was the first Indian blood shed by a white man from the time of the treaty of Bouquet. In the beginning of February, 1774, the Indians killed six white men and two negroes;
Congo Creek (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
obertson, and Valentine Sevier. Their praise resounded not in the backwoods only, but through all Virginia. Soon after the battle a reinforcement of three hundred troops arrived from Fincastle. Following orders tardily received from Dunmore, the little army, Chap. XV.} 1774 Oct. leaving a garrison at Point Pleasant, dashed across the Ohio to defy new battles. After a march of eighty miles through an untrodden wilderness, on the twentyfourth of October they encamped on the banks of Congo Creek in Pickaway, near old Chillicothe. The Indians, disheartened at the junction, threw themselves on the mercy of the English; and at Camp Charlotte, which stood on the left bank of Sippo Creek, about seven miles southeast of Circleville, Dunmore admitted them to a conference. Logan did not appear; but through an Indian interpreter he sent this message: I appeal to any white man to say if he ever entered Logan's cabin, and I gave him not meat; if he ever came naked, and I clothed him n
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
forty-six men killed and about eighty wounded. This battle was the most bloody and best contested in the annals of forest warfare. The number of the Red Men who were engaged, was probably not less than eight hundred; how many of them fell was never ascertained. The heroes of that day proved themselves worthy to found states. Among them were Isaac Shelby, the first governor of Kentucky; William Campbell; the brave George Matthews; Fleming; Andrew Moore, afterwards a senator of the United States; Evan Shelby, James Robertson, and Valentine Sevier. Their praise resounded not in the backwoods only, but through all Virginia. Soon after the battle a reinforcement of three hundred troops arrived from Fincastle. Following orders tardily received from Dunmore, the little army, Chap. XV.} 1774 Oct. leaving a garrison at Point Pleasant, dashed across the Ohio to defy new battles. After a march of eighty miles through an untrodden wilderness, on the twentyfourth of October they en
Fort Stanwix (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ere followed by counter arrests; the country on the Monongahela, then the great avenue to the West, became a scene of con- Chap. XV.} 1774. fusion. The territory north and west of the Ohio, belonged by act of parliament to the province of Quebec; yet Dunmore professed to conduct the government and grant the lands on the Scioto, the Wabash and the Illinois. South of the Ohio river Franklin's inchoate province of Vandalia stretched from the Alleghanies to Kentucky river; the treaty at Fort Stanwix bounded Virginia by the Tennessee; the treaty at Lochaber carried its limit only to the mouth of the Great Kanawha. The king's instructions confined settlements to the east of the mountains. There was no one, therefore, having authority to give an undisputed title to any land west of the Alleghanies, or to restrain the restlessness of the American emigrants. With the love of wandering that formed a part of their nature, the hardy backwoodsman, clad in a hunting shirt and deerskin leggi
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 15: The governor of Virginia Nullifies the Quebec act. October—November, 1774. The attempt to extend the jurisdiction of Quebec to Chap. XV.} 1774. the Ohio river had no sanction in English history, and was resisted by the older colonies, especially by Virginia. The interest of the crown offices in the adjacent provinces was also at variance with the policy of parliament. No royal governor showed more rapacity in the use of official power than Lord Dunmore. He had relu.} 1774. fusion. The territory north and west of the Ohio, belonged by act of parliament to the province of Quebec; yet Dunmore professed to conduct the government and grant the lands on the Scioto, the Wabash and the Illinois. South of the Ohio river Franklin's inchoate province of Vandalia stretched from the Alleghanies to Kentucky river; the treaty at Fort Stanwix bounded Virginia by the Tennessee; the treaty at Lochaber carried its limit only to the mouth of the Great Kanawha. The king'
Fincastle (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
how many of them fell was never ascertained. The heroes of that day proved themselves worthy to found states. Among them were Isaac Shelby, the first governor of Kentucky; William Campbell; the brave George Matthews; Fleming; Andrew Moore, afterwards a senator of the United States; Evan Shelby, James Robertson, and Valentine Sevier. Their praise resounded not in the backwoods only, but through all Virginia. Soon after the battle a reinforcement of three hundred troops arrived from Fincastle. Following orders tardily received from Dunmore, the little army, Chap. XV.} 1774 Oct. leaving a garrison at Point Pleasant, dashed across the Ohio to defy new battles. After a march of eighty miles through an untrodden wilderness, on the twentyfourth of October they encamped on the banks of Congo Creek in Pickaway, near old Chillicothe. The Indians, disheartened at the junction, threw themselves on the mercy of the English; and at Camp Charlotte, which stood on the left bank of Sippo
Kanawha (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
a, for the men from the southwestern counties of Virginia, he crossed the river and proceeded to the Shawanese towns, which he found deserted. The summons from Dunmore, borne beyond the Blue Ridge, roused the settlers on the Green Briar, the New River, and the Holston. The Watauga republicans also, who never owned English rule, and never required English protection, heard the cry of their brethren in distress; and a company of nearly fifty of them, under the command of Evan Shelby, with James Robertson and Valentine Sevier as sergeants, marched as volunteers. The name of every one of them is preserved and cherished. Leaving home in August, they crossed the New river, and joined the army of western Virginia at Camp Union, on the Great Levels of Green Briar. From that place, now called Lewisburg, to the mouth of the Great Kanawha, the distance is about one hundred and sixty miles. At that time there was not even a trace over the rugged mountains; but the gallant young woodsmen w
Sullivan (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
s later, Brainerd wore away life as a missionary among the fifty cabins of the village. Logan had grown up as the friend of white men; but the spirits of his kindred clamored for blood. With chosen companions, he went out upon the war path, and added scalp to-scalp, till the number was also thirteen. Now, said the chief, I am satisfied for the loss of my relations, and will sit still. But the Shawanese, the most warlike of the tribes, prowled from the Alleghany river to what is now Sullivan county in Tennessee. One of them returned with the scalps of forty men, women, and children. On the other hand, a party of white men, with Dunmore's permission, destroyed an Indian village on the Muskingum. To restrain the backwoodsmen and end the miseries which distracted the frontier, and to look after Chap. XV.} 1774. Sept. his own interests and his agents, Dunmore, with the hearty approbation of the colony, called out the militia of the southwest, and himself repaired to Pittsburg. In
Vandalia (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
uncil of Pennsylvania. Jurisdiction was opposed to jurisdiction; arrests were followed by counter arrests; the country on the Monongahela, then the great avenue to the West, became a scene of con- Chap. XV.} 1774. fusion. The territory north and west of the Ohio, belonged by act of parliament to the province of Quebec; yet Dunmore professed to conduct the government and grant the lands on the Scioto, the Wabash and the Illinois. South of the Ohio river Franklin's inchoate province of Vandalia stretched from the Alleghanies to Kentucky river; the treaty at Fort Stanwix bounded Virginia by the Tennessee; the treaty at Lochaber carried its limit only to the mouth of the Great Kanawha. The king's instructions confined settlements to the east of the mountains. There was no one, therefore, having authority to give an undisputed title to any land west of the Alleghanies, or to restrain the restlessness of the American emigrants. With the love of wandering that formed a part of their
Westmoreland (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
e purchases of land from the Indians in southern Illinois. In 1773, Chap. XV.} 1774. his agents, the Bullets, made surveys at the falls of the Ohio; and a part of Louisville, and of the towns opsite Cincinnati, are now held under his warrant. The area of the Ancient Dominion expanded with his cupidity. Pittsburg, and the country as far up the Monongahela as Redstone Old Fort, formed the rallying point for western emigration and Indian trade. It was a part of the county of Westmoreland, in Pennsylvania. Suddenly and without proper notice to the council of that province, Dunmore extended his own jurisdiction over the tempting and well-peopled region. He found a willing instrument in one John Conolly, a native of Pennsylvania, a physician, landjobber, and subservient political intriguer, who had travelled much in the Ohio valley, both by water and land. Commissioned by Dunmore as captaincommandant for Pittsburg and its dependencies, that is to say of all the western country, C
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