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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition.. Search the whole document.

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incial Chap. XXVI.} 1775. April. congress of Massachusetts, still fondly hoping for a peaceful end of all their troubles, so far recognised the authority of Gage, as to vote, that if he would issue writs in the usual form for the election of a general assembly, to be held on the last Wednesday in May, the towns ought to obey the precepts, and elect members; but in case such writs should not be issued, they recommended the choice of delegates for a third provincial congress. On Sunday, the second, two vessels arrived at Marblehead with the tidings, that both houses of parliament had pledged to the king their lives and fortunes for the reduction of America, that New England was prohibited from the fisheries, and that the army of Gage was to be largely reinforced. The next morning, congress re- April 3. quired the attendance of all absent members, and desired the towns not yet represented to send members without delay. If America, wrote Joseph Warren on that day, Chap. XXVI.} 177
e with America is not so alarming as some people apprehend. I have not the least doubt it will end speedily, happily, and without bloodshed. On the twenty-third of May, secret advices from May 23. Philadelphia confirmed Dartmouth and the king in their confidence, that North's conciliatory resolution would remove all obstacles to the restoration of. public tranquillity, through the moderation and loyal disposition of the assembly of New York. The king, in proroguing parliament on the twenty-sixth, no longer introduced the rebel people of Massachusetts, but spoke only of his subjects in America, whose wishes were to be gratified and apprehensions removed as far as the constitution would allow. The Chap. XXVI.} 1775 May. 27. court gazette of the day was equally moderate. Themembers of parliament dispersed, and as yet no tidings came from the colonies of a later date than the middle of April. All America, from Lake Champlain to the Altamaha; all Europe, Madrid, Paris, Amsterdam,
y, and without bloodshed. On the twenty-third of May, secret advices from May 23. Philadelphia confirmed Dartmouth and the king in their confidence, that North's conciliatory resolution would remove all obstacles to the restoration of. public tranquillity, through the moderation and loyal disposition of the assembly of New York. The king, in proroguing parliament on the twenty-sixth, no longer introduced the rebel people of Massachusetts, but spoke only of his subjects in America, whose wishes were to be gratified and apprehensions removed as far as the constitution would allow. The Chap. XXVI.} 1775 May. 27. court gazette of the day was equally moderate. Themembers of parliament dispersed, and as yet no tidings came from the colonies of a later date than the middle of April. All America, from Lake Champlain to the Altamaha; all Europe, Madrid, Paris, Amsterdam, Vienna, hardly less than London, were gazing with expectation towards the little villages that lay around Boston.
Chapter 26: The king Waits to hear of the success of Lord North's proposition. April—May, 1775. even so late as the first day of April, the provincial Chap. XXVI.} 1775. April. congress of Massachusetts, still fondly hoping for a peaceful end of all their troubles, so far recognised the authority of Gage, as to vote, that if he would issue writs in the usual form for the election of a general assembly, to be held on the last Wednesday in May, the towns ought to obey the precepts, and elect members; but in case such writs should not be issued, they recommended the choice of delegates for a third provincial congress. On Sunday, the second, two vessels arrived at Marblehead with the tidings, that both houses of parliament had pledged to the king their lives and fortunes for the reduction of America, that New England was prohibited from the fisheries, and that the army of Gage was to be largely reinforced. The next morning, congress re- April 3. quired the attendance of a
both houses of parliament had pledged to the king their lives and fortunes for the reduction of America, that New England was prohibited from the fisheries, and that the army of Gage was to be largely reinforced. The next morning, congress re- April 3. quired the attendance of all absent members, and desired the towns not yet represented to send members without delay. If America, wrote Joseph Warren on that day, Chap. XXVI.} 1775. April. is an humble instrument of the salvation of Britai. With the utmost secrecy, the king sent over Allan Maclean of Torloish, to entice to the royal standard the Highlanders of the old forty-seventh regiment, now settled in that province; at the very time when its convention, which met on the third of April, were Chap. XXVI.} 1775. April. 10. expressing a perfect agreement with the general congress; and were heartily seconded by its assembly. New York was the pivot of the policy of minis-10. ters. The defection of its assembly from the act
April 10th (search for this): chapter 27
hat can organize and guide. Gage, who himself had about three thousand effective men, learned through his spies the state of the country and the ludicrously scanty amount of stores, collected by the provincial committees at Worcester and Concord. The report increased his confidence as well as the insolence of his officers; and as soon as the members of the congress had gone to their homes, he resolved on striking a blow, as the Chap. XXVI.} 1775. April. 10. king desired. On the tenth of April, the lord mayor Wilkes, with the aldermen and livery of London, approached the throne, to complain to the king that the real purpose of his ministers, whom they earnestly besought him to dismiss, was, to establish arbitrary power over all America; the king answered: It is with the utmost astonishment that I find any of my subjects capable of encouraging the rebellious disposition which unhappily exists in some of my colonies; and by a letter from the lord chamberlain, he announced his pu
April 15th (search for this): chapter 27
ht act on the defensive. If the forces of the colony should be called out, the members of the congress agreed to repair instantly to Concord. Then, on the fifteenth of April, they adjourned, expecting a long and desperate war with the mighty power of Great Britain, yet with no treasury but the good — will of the people; not a so king. But if Rivington's gazette quoted texts of Scripture in favor of passive obedience, Holt's paper replied by other texts and examples. The New York mer- April 15. chants who furnished supplies to the British army at Boston, were denounced at the liberty pole as enemies to the country. When Sears, who moved that every manry, with a marvellous blindness that but for positive evidence would be incredible, thought it easy to subdue Massachusetts, and corrupt New York. On the fifteenth day of April, letters were written to Gage, to take possession of every colonial fort; to seize and secure all military stores of every kind, collected for the rebels;
April 20th (search for this): chapter 27
egates to another congress, a poll was taken throughout the city, and against one hundred and sixty-three, there appeared eight hundred and twenty-five in favor of being represented. The rural counties co-operated with the city; and on the twentieth of April, forty-one delegates met in April 20. convention, chose Philip Livingston unanimously their president; re-elected all their old members to Congress, except the lukewarm Isaac Low; and unanimously added five others, among them Philip SchuyApril 20. convention, chose Philip Livingston unanimously their president; re-elected all their old members to Congress, except the lukewarm Isaac Low; and unanimously added five others, among them Philip Schuy- Chap. XXVI.} 1775. April. ler, George Clinton, and Robert R. Livingston; not to hasten a revolution, but to concert measures for the preservation of American rights, and for the restoration of harmony between Great Britain and the colonies. This happened at a time when the king believed New York won over by immunities and benefactions and the generals who were on the point of sailing were disputing for the command at that place. Burgoyne would best manage a negotiation, said the king; bu
Chapter 26: The king Waits to hear of the success of Lord North's proposition. April—May, 1775. even so late as the first day of April, the provincial Chap. XXVI.} 1775. April. congress of Massachusetts, still fondly hoping for a peaceful end of all their troubles, so far recognised the authority of Gage, as to vote, that if he would issue writs in the usual form for the election of a general assembly, to be held on the last Wednesday in May, the towns ought to obey the precepts, and elect members; but in case such writs should not be issued, they recommended the choice of delegates for a third provincial congress. On Sunday, the second, two vessels arrived at Marblehead with the tidings, that both houses of parliament had pledged to the king their lives and fortunes for the reduction of America, that New England was prohibited from the fisheries, and that the army of Gage was to be largely reinforced. The next morning, congress re- April 3. quired the attendance of
was false only as he was weak and uncertain. He really wished to concede and conciliate, but he had not force enough to come to a clear understanding even with himself. When he encountered the opposition in the house of commons, he sustained his administration by speaking confidently for vigorous measures; when alone his heart sank within him from dread of civil war. The remonstrance and memorial of the assembly of New York, which Burke, their agent, presented to parliament on the fifteenth of May, was rejected, be- May. 15. cause they questioned the right of parliament to tax America. Three days later, Lord North avowed the orders for raising Canadian regiments of French Papists; however, he continued, the dispute with America is not so alarming as some people apprehend. I have not the least doubt it will end speedily, happily, and without bloodshed. On the twenty-third of May, secret advices from May 23. Philadelphia confirmed Dartmouth and the king in their confidence,
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