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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
the king; but Howe would not resign his right to the post of confidence. Vergennes saw things just as they were; the British ministry, with a marvellous blindness that but for positive evidence would be incredible, thought it easy to subdue Massachusetts, and corrupt New York. On the fifteenth day of April, letters were written to Gage, to take possession of every colonial fort; to seize and secure all military stores of every kind, collected for the rebels; to arrest and imprison all such awould remove all obstacles to the restoration of. public tranquillity, through the moderation and loyal disposition of the assembly of New York. The king, in proroguing parliament on the twenty-sixth, no longer introduced the rebel people of Massachusetts, but spoke only of his subjects in America, whose wishes were to be gratified and apprehensions removed as far as the constitution would allow. The Chap. XXVI.} 1775 May. 27. court gazette of the day was equally moderate. Themembers of pa
Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
olt's paper replied by other texts and examples. The New York mer- April 15. chants who furnished supplies to the British army at Boston, were denounced at the liberty pole as enemies to the country. When Sears, who moved that every man should provide himself with four and twenty rounds, was carried before the mayor and refused to give bail, he was liberated on his way to prison, and with flying colors, a crowd of friends, and loud huzzas for him and for Macdougall, was conducted through Broadway to a meeting in the Fields. If the assembly, by a majority of four, refused to forbid importations, the press taunted them for taking gifts, and when they would have permitted a ship to discharge its cargo, the committee laughed at their vote and enforced the association., As they refused to choose delegates to another congress, a poll was taken throughout the city, and against one hundred and sixty-three, there appeared eight hundred and twenty-five in favor of being represented. The rur
Amsterdam (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
y, and without bloodshed. On the twenty-third of May, secret advices from May 23. Philadelphia confirmed Dartmouth and the king in their confidence, that North's conciliatory resolution would remove all obstacles to the restoration of. public tranquillity, through the moderation and loyal disposition of the assembly of New York. The king, in proroguing parliament on the twenty-sixth, no longer introduced the rebel people of Massachusetts, but spoke only of his subjects in America, whose wishes were to be gratified and apprehensions removed as far as the constitution would allow. The Chap. XXVI.} 1775 May. 27. court gazette of the day was equally moderate. Themembers of parliament dispersed, and as yet no tidings came from the colonies of a later date than the middle of April. All America, from Lake Champlain to the Altamaha; all Europe, Madrid, Paris, Amsterdam, Vienna, hardly less than London, were gazing with expectation towards the little villages that lay around Boston.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
orporate capacity. If more troops were sent, the king's standard erected, and a few of the leaders taken up, Hutchinson was ready to stake his life for the submission of the colonies. Some of the ministry believed that they were getting more and more divided, and that there would be no great difficulty in bringing the contest to a conclusion. The sending reinforcements was treated as almost a matter of indifference. To assist in disjoining the colonies, New York, North Carolina, and Georgia, were excepted from restraints imposed on the trade and fisheries of all the rest. That North Carolina could be retained in obedience, through a part of its own people, was believed in England, on the authority of its governor. With the utmost secrecy, the king sent over Allan Maclean of Torloish, to entice to the royal standard the Highlanders of the old forty-seventh regiment, now settled in that province; at the very time when its convention, which met on the third of April, were Cha
Montreal (Canada) (search for this): chapter 27
after deliberating in council for two days, promised in their turn to intercede with the Six Nations in behalf of the colonists among whom they dwelt. Meantime the Green Mountain Boys formally renounced the government of New York, which was virtually renouncing their allegiance to the king; and agreed to seize the fort at Ticonderoga as soon as the king's troops should commit hostilities. Their purpose was communicated in profound secrecy to Thomas Walker, a restless Anglo-Canadian, at Montreal. In my opinion, wrote Walker to Samuel Adams and Joseph Warren, they are the most proper persons for this job, which will effectually curb the province of Quebec. The congress of Massachusetts adopted a code for its future army, and authorized the committee of safety to form and pay six companies of artillery; yet they refused to take into pay any part of the militia or minute men. They enjoined every town to have its committee of correspondence; they ordered a day of fasting and prayer
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ut by committees of correspondence; no visible centre of authority; and no distinguished general officer to take the command of the provincial troops. Anarchy must prevail, unless there lives in the heart of the people an invisible, resistless, formative principle, that can organize and guide. Gage, who himself had about three thousand effective men, learned through his spies the state of the country and the ludicrously scanty amount of stores, collected by the provincial committees at Worcester and Concord. The report increased his confidence as well as the insolence of his officers; and as soon as the members of the congress had gone to their homes, he resolved on striking a blow, as the Chap. XXVI.} 1775. April. 10. king desired. On the tenth of April, the lord mayor Wilkes, with the aldermen and livery of London, approached the throne, to complain to the king that the real purpose of his ministers, whom they earnestly besought him to dismiss, was, to establish arbitrary
Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
dians who were domiciled at Stockbridge, the congress voted a blanket and a ribbon as a testimony of affection, saying, we are all brothers. The Stockbridge Indians, after deliberating in council for two days, promised in their turn to intercede with the Six Nations in behalf of the colonists among whom they dwelt. Meantime the Green Mountain Boys formally renounced the government of New York, which was virtually renouncing their allegiance to the king; and agreed to seize the fort at Ticonderoga as soon as the king's troops should commit hostilities. Their purpose was communicated in profound secrecy to Thomas Walker, a restless Anglo-Canadian, at Montreal. In my opinion, wrote Walker to Samuel Adams and Joseph Warren, they are the most proper persons for this job, which will effectually curb the province of Quebec. The congress of Massachusetts adopted a code for its future army, and authorized the committee of safety to form and pay six companies of artillery; yet they ref
Canadian (United States) (search for this): chapter 27
— the end will be glorious. United and prepared as we are, we have no reason to doubt of success, if we should be compelled to the last appeal; but we mean not to make that appeal until we can be justified in doing it in the sight of God and man. Happy shall we be, if the mother country will allow us the free enjoyment of our rights, and indulge us in the pleasing employment of aggrandizing her. The most appalling danger proceeded from the Indians of the northwest, whom it was now known Canadian emissaries were seeking to influence. The hateful office fell naturally into the hands of La Come, Hamilton, the lieutenant governor for Detroit, and others, who were most ready to serve the bad passions of those from whom they expected favors. Guy Johnson was also carefully removing the American missionaries from the Six Nations. Countervailing measures were required for immediate security. Dartmouth college, a new and defenceless institution of charity on the frontier, where childre
Madrid (Spain) (search for this): chapter 27
ly, and without bloodshed. On the twenty-third of May, secret advices from May 23. Philadelphia confirmed Dartmouth and the king in their confidence, that North's conciliatory resolution would remove all obstacles to the restoration of. public tranquillity, through the moderation and loyal disposition of the assembly of New York. The king, in proroguing parliament on the twenty-sixth, no longer introduced the rebel people of Massachusetts, but spoke only of his subjects in America, whose wishes were to be gratified and apprehensions removed as far as the constitution would allow. The Chap. XXVI.} 1775 May. 27. court gazette of the day was equally moderate. Themembers of parliament dispersed, and as yet no tidings came from the colonies of a later date than the middle of April. All America, from Lake Champlain to the Altamaha; all Europe, Madrid, Paris, Amsterdam, Vienna, hardly less than London, were gazing with expectation towards the little villages that lay around Boston.
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 27
y, and without bloodshed. On the twenty-third of May, secret advices from May 23. Philadelphia confirmed Dartmouth and the king in their confidence, that North's conciliatory resolution would remove all obstacles to the restoration of. public tranquillity, through the moderation and loyal disposition of the assembly of New York. The king, in proroguing parliament on the twenty-sixth, no longer introduced the rebel people of Massachusetts, but spoke only of his subjects in America, whose wishes were to be gratified and apprehensions removed as far as the constitution would allow. The Chap. XXVI.} 1775 May. 27. court gazette of the day was equally moderate. Themembers of parliament dispersed, and as yet no tidings came from the colonies of a later date than the middle of April. All America, from Lake Champlain to the Altamaha; all Europe, Madrid, Paris, Amsterdam, Vienna, hardly less than London, were gazing with expectation towards the little villages that lay around Boston.
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