hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 250 0 Browse Search
1775 AD 243 243 Browse Search
1774 AD 184 184 Browse Search
Gage 176 6 Browse Search
New England (United States) 146 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 132 0 Browse Search
Samuel Adams 96 0 Browse Search
Franklin 94 0 Browse Search
William Prescott 86 0 Browse Search
France (France) 80 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 214 total hits in 72 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
ruthless hordes to take up arms, and distress the people along their extended frontier, till they should be driven to the British for protection. Beyond the Alleghanies a commonwealth was rising on the banks of the Kentucky river, and by the very principles on which it was formed, it unconsciously renounced dependence on Britain. Henderson and his associates had, during the winter, negotiated a treaty with the Cherokees for the land between the Ohio, the Cumberland mountains, the Cumberland river, and the Kentucky river; on the seventeenth of March they received their deed. To this territory, Daniel Boone, with a body of en- Chap. XXXV.} 1775. May. terprising companions, proceeded at once to mark out a path up Powell's valley; and through mountains and cane-brakes beyond. On the twenty-fifth of the month they were waylaid by Indians, who killed two men and wounded another very severely. Two days later the savages killed and scalped two more. Now, wrote Daniel Boone, is th
Hingham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
as bursting into life. Boston was so strictly beleaguered, that it was only from the islands in and near the harbor that fodder, or straw, or fresh meat could be obtained for the British army. On Sunday May 21. morning, the twenty-first of May, about sunrise, it was discovered, that they were attempting to secure the hay on Grape Island. Three alarm guns were fired; the drums beat to arms; the bells of Weymouth and Braintree were set a ringing; and the men of Weymouth, and Braintree, and Hingham, and of other places, to the number of two thousand, swarmed to the sea side. Warren, ever the bravest among the brave, ever present where there was danger, came also. After some delay, a lighter and a sloop were obtained; and the Americans eagerly jumped on board. The younger brother of John Adams was one of the first to push off and land on the island. The English retreated, while the Americans set fire to the hay. On the twenty-fifth of May, Howe, Clinton, May 25. and Burgoyne, a
Weymouth (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
l subjection. A new nation was bursting into life. Boston was so strictly beleaguered, that it was only from the islands in and near the harbor that fodder, or straw, or fresh meat could be obtained for the British army. On Sunday May 21. morning, the twenty-first of May, about sunrise, it was discovered, that they were attempting to secure the hay on Grape Island. Three alarm guns were fired; the drums beat to arms; the bells of Weymouth and Braintree were set a ringing; and the men of Weymouth, and Braintree, and Hingham, and of other places, to the number of two thousand, swarmed to the sea side. Warren, ever the bravest among the brave, ever present where there was danger, came also. After some delay, a lighter and a sloop were obtained; and the Americans eagerly jumped on board. The younger brother of John Adams was one of the first to push off and land on the island. The English retreated, while the Americans set fire to the hay. On the twenty-fifth of May, Howe, Clint
Boone (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
t will ever be the case, and he pressed forward to the Kentucky river. There, on the first day of April, at the distance of about sixty yards from its west bank, near the mouth of Otter Creek, he began a stockade fort; which took the name of Boonesborough. At that place, while the congress at Philadelphia was groping irresolutely in the dark, seventeen men assembled as representatives of the four May 25. towns that then formed the seed of the state. Among these children of nature was Danieleceding buffaloes, till at last he plunged into the remote forest, and was never heard of more. These and their associates, the fathers of Ken- May 23. tucky, seventeen in all, met on the twenty-third of May, beneath the great elm tree of Boonesborough, outside of the fort, on the thick sward of the fragrant white clover. The convention having been organized, prayers were read by a minister of the church of England. A speech was then delivered to the convention in behalf of the proprietar
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 36
ew York; they for the time rejected the thought of invading Canada, and they were inclined even to abandon the conquest already made; though as a precaution they proposed to withdraw to the head of Lake George all the captured cannon and munitions of war, which on the restoration of peace were to be scrupulously returned. For many days the state of the union continued to engage the attention of congress in a committee of the whole. The bolder minds, yet not even all the delegates from New England, discerned the tendency of events towards an entire separation of the colonies from Britain. In the wide division of opinions the decision appeared for a time to rest on South Carolina; but the delegates from that province, no Chap. XXXV.} 1775. May. less than from the others of the south, like the central colonies, nourished the hope of peace, for which they desired to make one more petition. Vain illusion! The unappeasable malice of the supporters of the ministry was bent on the
Kentucky River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
ould be driven to the British for protection. Beyond the Alleghanies a commonwealth was rising on the banks of the Kentucky river, and by the very principles on which it was formed, it unconsciously renounced dependence on Britain. Henderson aned a treaty with the Cherokees for the land between the Ohio, the Cumberland mountains, the Cumberland river, and the Kentucky river; on the seventeenth of March they received their deed. To this territory, Daniel Boone, with a body of en- Chap. Xe to keep the country while we are in it. If we give way now, it will ever be the case, and he pressed forward to the Kentucky river. There, on the first day of April, at the distance of about sixty yards from its west bank, near the mouth of Otter laimed their bones from their graves far up the Missouri, and now they lie buried on the hill above the cliffs of the Kentucky river, overlooking the lovely valley of the capital of that commonwealth. Around them are emblems of wilderness life; the
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
us was Mecklenburg county, in North Carolina, separated from the British empire. The resolves were transmitted with all haste to be printed in Charleston, and as they spread through the South, they startled the royal governors of Georgia and North Carolina. They were despatched by a messenger to the continental congress, that the world might know their authors had renounced their allegiance to the king of Great Britain, and had constituted a government for themselves. The messenger stopped on his way at Salisbury, and there, to a crowd round the court-house, the resolves were read and approved. The western counties were the most populous part of North Carolina; and the royal governor had flattered himself and the king, with the fullest assurances of their support. I have no doubt, said he, that I might command their best services at a word on any emergency. I consider I have the means in my own hands to maintain the sovereignty of this country to my royal master in all events.
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
oston harbor was burned down. They were as ready for partisan enterprises on the water as on land; if they could only get gunpowder, they were confident of driving off the British. The same daring prevailed on the northern frontier. The possession of Ticonderoga and Crown Chap. XXXV.} 1775. May. Point, the fortresses round which hovered the chief American traditions and recollections of military service, inflamed the imagination and stimulated the enterprise of the brave settlers of Vermont. A schooner, called for the occasion, Liberty, was manned and armed; and Arnold, who had had experience at sea, took the command. With a fresh southerly wind he readily passed the lake; early on the morning of the eighteenth, at the head of a party May 18. in boats, he surprised a sergeant and twelve men, and captured them, their arms, two serviceable brass field pieces, and a British sloop which lay in the harbor of St. John's. In about an hour the wind suddenly shifted, and, with a st
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
fort; which took the name of Boonesborough. At that place, while the congress at Philadelphia was groping irresolutely in the dark, seventeen men assembled as representatives of the four May 25. towns that then formed the seed of the state. Among these children of nature was Daniel Boone, the pioneer of the party. His colleague, Richard Galloway, was one of the founders of Kentucky and one of its early martyrs. The town of St. Asaph sent John Floyd, a surveyor who emigrated from southwestern Virginia; an able writer, respected for his culture and dignity of manner; of innate good breed ing; ready to defend the weak; to follow the trail of the savage; heedless of his own life if he could recover women and children who had been made captive; destined to do good service, and survive the dangers of western life till American independence should be fought for and won. From the settlement at Boiling Spring came James Harrod, the same who, in 1774, had led a party of forty-one to Ha
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
the result of their deliberations, framed with superior skill, precision of language, and calm comprehensiveness, remains as the monument of their wisdom and their courage. Of the delegates to that memorable assembly, the name of Ephraim Brevard should be remembered with honor by his countrymen. He was one of a numerous family of patriot brothers, and himself in the end fell a martyr to the public cause. Trained in the college at Princeton, ripened among the brave Presbyterians of Middle Carolina, he digested the system which was then adopted, and which formed in effect a declaration of independence, as well as a complete system of government. All laws and commissions confirmed by or derived from the authority of the king or parlia- Chap. XXXV.} 1775. May. ment, such are the bold but well considered words of these daring statesmen, are annulled and vacated; all commissions, civil and military, heretofore granted by the crown to be exercised in the colonies, are void; the provinc
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...