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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Boston Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
eliberations in the committee of the whole had resulted in a compromise. Then, on Thursday, the twenty-fifth, directions were given to the provincial congress in New York to preserve the communication between the city of New York and the country, by fortifying posts at the upper end of the island, near King's Bridge, and on each side of Hudson river, in the Highlands. A post was also to be taken at or near Lake George. On that same day, while Howe, Clinton and Burgoyne were entering Boston harbor, Duane, a delegate from New York, moved in the committee of the whole, the opening of a negotiation in order to accommodate the unhappy disputes subsisting between Great Britain and the colonies, and that this be made a part of the petition to the king. A negotiation once begun, said Golden, on hearing the news, will give the people time to cool and feel the consequence of what they have already done, before the whole colonies become equally desperate. The dangerous proposal produced a
King's Bridge (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
d Hancock had long been known, though it had not yet been proclaimed. No progress could be made in authorizing vigor- Chap XXXVI.} 1775. May. ous measures of defence, until the long deliberations in the committee of the whole had resulted in a compromise. Then, on Thursday, the twenty-fifth, directions were given to the provincial congress in New York to preserve the communication between the city of New York and the country, by fortifying posts at the upper end of the island, near King's Bridge, and on each side of Hudson river, in the Highlands. A post was also to be taken at or near Lake George. On that same day, while Howe, Clinton and Burgoyne were entering Boston harbor, Duane, a delegate from New York, moved in the committee of the whole, the opening of a negotiation in order to accommodate the unhappy disputes subsisting between Great Britain and the colonies, and that this be made a part of the petition to the king. A negotiation once begun, said Golden, on hearing
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ble for Great Britain and safe for the colonies; and that neither king, nor ministry, nor parliament, nor the nation, Chap. XXXVI.} 1775. May. would admit of further relaxation; but that a perfectly united ministry would, if necessary, employ the whole force of the kingdom to reduce the rebellious and refractory provinces and colonies. The arrogance of the language in which this ultimatum was couched, should have ensured its prompt and unanimous rejection, and have nerved congress to immediate decision. But it was laid on the table of the body, which was bent on a petition to the king, and a negotiation with his ministers. The month of May went by, and congress had not so much as given to Massachusetts its advice that that province should institute a government of its own; it authorized no invasion of Canada, and only yielded its assent to the act of Connecticut in garrisoning Ticonderoga and Crown Point. If great measures are to be adopted, the impulse must come from without.
Fort Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ble for Great Britain and safe for the colonies; and that neither king, nor ministry, nor parliament, nor the nation, Chap. XXXVI.} 1775. May. would admit of further relaxation; but that a perfectly united ministry would, if necessary, employ the whole force of the kingdom to reduce the rebellious and refractory provinces and colonies. The arrogance of the language in which this ultimatum was couched, should have ensured its prompt and unanimous rejection, and have nerved congress to immediate decision. But it was laid on the table of the body, which was bent on a petition to the king, and a negotiation with his ministers. The month of May went by, and congress had not so much as given to Massachusetts its advice that that province should institute a government of its own; it authorized no invasion of Canada, and only yielded its assent to the act of Connecticut in garrisoning Ticonderoga and Crown Point. If great measures are to be adopted, the impulse must come from without.
Lake George, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
orizing vigor- Chap XXXVI.} 1775. May. ous measures of defence, until the long deliberations in the committee of the whole had resulted in a compromise. Then, on Thursday, the twenty-fifth, directions were given to the provincial congress in New York to preserve the communication between the city of New York and the country, by fortifying posts at the upper end of the island, near King's Bridge, and on each side of Hudson river, in the Highlands. A post was also to be taken at or near Lake George. On that same day, while Howe, Clinton and Burgoyne were entering Boston harbor, Duane, a delegate from New York, moved in the committee of the whole, the opening of a negotiation in order to accommodate the unhappy disputes subsisting between Great Britain and the colonies, and that this be made a part of the petition to the king. A negotiation once begun, said Golden, on hearing the news, will give the people time to cool and feel the consequence of what they have already done, befo
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ommodate the unhappy disputes subsisting between Great Britain and the colonies, and that this be made a part of the petition to the king. A negotiation once begun, said Golden, on hearing the news, will give the people time to cool and feel the consequence of what they have already done, before the whole colonies become equally desperate. The dangerous proposal produced a warm debate, which, at the adjournment, was not concluded. On the morning of the twenty-sixth, the delegates from New Jersey presented the vote of the assembly of that colony, refusing to consider Lord North's proposition as contained in the resolution of the house of commons, and consigning the subject to the continental congress. The communication was referred to the committee of the whole; which was thus officially in possession of the offer of the minister. The debate of the preceding day was renewed, and the timid party prevailed. The committee rose and submitted their report; upon which it was resolved
France (France) (search for this): chapter 37
e Quebec act went into effect; and on the twenty-ninth, the American congress, by the hand of Jay, addressed the Canadians: We most sincerely condole with you on the arrival of that day, in the course of which the sun could not shine on a single freeman in all your extensive dominions. By the introduction of your present form of government, or rather present form of tyranny, you and your wives and your children are made slaves. Appeals were also directed to their pride, their affection for France, their courage, and their regard for the common welfare; but no adequate mo- Chap. XXXVI.} 1775. May. tive for rising was set before them. As the congress intended still to petition the king, they could only request some vague co-operation in imploring the attention of their sovereign; a request which at most was only fitted to secure neutrality. The Canadians, as Frenchmen, feared not taxation by parliament, but the haughty dominion of their conquerors; as Catholics they dreaded the ex
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 37
ne, a delegate from New York, moved in the committee of the whole, the opening of a negotiation in order to accommodate the unhappy disputes subsisting between Great Britain and the colonies, and that this be made a part of the petition to the king. A negotiation once begun, said Golden, on hearing the news, will give the people t against the invasion of troops, alleging as a reason that it was very uncertain whether their earnest endeavors to accommodate the unhappy differences between Great Britain and the colonies, by conciliatory measures, would be successful. The support of the Canadians was also entreated, for it was recognised that the impending cry, it pressed earnestly the acceptance of the overture contained in the resolution of the house of commons. It was declared that the terms were honorable for Great Britain and safe for the colonies; and that neither king, nor ministry, nor parliament, nor the nation, Chap. XXXVI.} 1775. May. would admit of further relaxation;
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
o his opinion, and too sincerely a friend to peace to suppress any movement that promised its restoration. The delegates from New England, especially those from Massachusetts, could bring no remedy to the prevailing indecision; for they suffered from insinuations, that they represented a people who were republicans in their principles of government and fanatics in their religion; and they wisely avoided the appearance of importunity or excess in their demands. As the delegates from South Carolina declined the responsibility of a decision, which would have implied an abandonment of every hope of peace, there could be no efficient opposition to the policy of again seeking the restoration of American liberty through the mediation of the king. This plan had the great advantage over the suggestion of an immediate separation from Britain, that it could be boldly promulgated, and was in harmony with the general wish; for the people of the continent, taken collectively, had not as yet c
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ation. The delegates from New England, especially those from Massachusetts, could bring no remedy to the prevailing indecision; for they sncided with those of the most zealous. Now that the charter of Massachusetts had been impaired, he did not ask merely relief from parliamentall the vacillations of hesitancy, the determination to sustain Massachusetts was never for a moment in doubt. This appeared on the twenty-fyton Randolph for the legislature of Virginia, John Hancock, of Massachusetts, was elected unanimously in his stead, and Harrison, of Virginia peaceful solution. The acts altering the charter and laws of Massachusetts, were among those which the king was determined never to give uut the majority would never consent to sacrifice the charter of Massachusetts. The position which they chose was, therefore, weak and untena month of May went by, and congress had not so much as given to Massachusetts its advice that that province should institute a government of
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