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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
and, was considered; but it was determined to concentrate the British forces at New York, as the best means of securing the central provinces and the connection with Canada. The vaunts of Dunmore were so far heeded, that a small force of some hundred men was held sufficient, with the aid of loyalists and negroes, to recover the province. The promises of Martin led to the belief that, on the appearance of a few regiments, the Highland emigrants and many thousands in the back counties of North Carolina would rally round the royal standard; and in consequence, five regiments of infantry, with ten thousand stand of arms, six small field pieces, two hundred rounds of powder and ball for each musket and field piece, were ordered to be in readiness to sail from Cork early in December; and this force was soon after made equal to seven regiments. I am not apprized where they are going; thus Barrington expostulated with Dartmouth; but if there should be an idea of such a force marching up the
Moscow, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
51: Parliament is at one with the king. October—December, 1775. when the Russians arrive, will you go and see Chap. LI.} 1775. Oct. their camp? wrote Edward Gibbon to a friend. We have great hopes of getting a body of these barbarians; the ministers daily and hourly expect to hear that the business is concluded; the worst of it is, the Baltic will soon be frozen up, and it must be late next year before they can get to America. The couriers that, one after another, arrived from Moscow, dispelled this confidence. The king was surprised by the refusal of the empress of Russia, and found fault with her manner as not genteel; for, said he, she has not had the civility to answer me in her own hand; and has thrown out expressions that may be civil to a Russian ear, but certainly not to more civilized ones. Yet he bore the disappointment with his wonted firmness; and turned for relief to the smaller princes of Germany, who now, on the failure of his great speculation, had the
Glasgow (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 11
oved stationing a few regiments in each capital. He was certain that the Americans had been aiming Chap. LI.} 1775. all along at independence, and like the Bedford party in parliament, he held it fortunate that matters had so soon been brought to a crisis. As a lover of mankind, he was ready to bewail the check to prosperous and growing states; but, said he, we are past the hour of lenitives and half exertions. On the other hand, John Millar, the professor of law in the university of Glasgow, taught the youth of Scotland who frequented his lectures, that the republican form of government is by far the best, either for a very small or a very extensive country. I cannot but agree with him, said David Hume, who yet maintained that it would be most criminal to disjoint the established government in Great Britain, where he believed a republic would so certainly be the immediate forerunner of despotism, that none but fools would think to augment liberty by shaking off monarchy. H
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 11
f the constitution. Outside of parliament, the most intelligent among the philosophers of North Britain yielded to the ministerial measures a reluctant acquiescence or discountenanced them by open who yet maintained that it would be most criminal to disjoint the established government in Great Britain, where he believed a republic would so certainly be the immediate forerunner of despotism, treason by the groundless jealousy of the merchants and manufacturers of the mother country. Great Britain, said he, derives nothing but loss from the dominion she assumes over her colonies. It is uered by force alone. And he pointed out the vast immediate and continuing advantages which Great Britain would derive, if she should voluntarily give up all authority over her colonies, and leave tisk of being rated a visionary enthusiast, he now sought to convince the landed gentry, that Great Britain would lose nothing if she should renounce her colonies and cultivate commerce with them as a
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 11
t to more civilized ones. Yet he bore the disappointment with his wonted firmness; and turned for relief to the smaller princes of Germany, who now, on the failure of his great speculation, had the British exchequer at their Chap. LI.} 1775. Oct. mercy. The plan of the coming campaign was made in the undoubting expectation of completely finishing the war in season to disband the extraordinary forces within two years. For the Russians, who were to have protected the city and province of Quebec, Germans were to be substituted, whatever might be the cost. The advantage of keeping possession of Boston as a means of occupying the attention of New England, was considered; but it was determined to concentrate the British forces at New York, as the best means of securing the central provinces and the connection with Canada. The vaunts of Dunmore were so far heeded, that a small force of some hundred men was held sufficient, with the aid of loyalists and negroes, to recover the province
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 11
ns to individ- Chap. LI.} 1775. Dec. uals or to a whole community in the lump. The atrocity of the measure was exposed in the house of commons, but without effect; on the third reading, in the house of lords, Mansfield explained his own views, which in their essential features were also those of the king: The people of America are as much bound to obey the acts of the British parliament as the inhabitants of London and Middlesex. I have not a doubt in my mind, that ever since the peace of Paris the northern colonies have been meditating a state of independence on this country. But allowing that all their professions are genuine, that every measure hitherto taken to compel submission to the parliamentary authority of this country was cruel and unjust, yet what, my lords, are we to do? Are we to rest inactive with our arms across, till they shall think proper to begin the attack, and gain strength to do it with effect? We are now in such a situation that we must either fight or be
Sandwich, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
entury. The England that the world revered, the England that kept alive in Europe the vestal fire of freedom, was at this time outside of the Chap. LI.} 1775. Nov. government, though steadily gaining political strength. Chatham, while he had life in him, was its nerve. Had Grenville been living, it would have included Grenville; it retained Rockingham, Grenville's successor; it had now recovered Grafton, Chatham's successor; and Lord North, who succeeded Grafton, sided with Germain and Sandwich only by spasms, and though he loved his place, was more against his own ministry than for it. The king's policy was not in harmony with the England of the Revolution, nor with that of the eighteenth century, nor with that of the nineteenth. The England of to-day, which receives and brightens and passes along the torch of liberty, has an honest lineage, and springs from the England of the last century; but it had no representative in the ministry of Lord North, or the majority of the fourte
Manchester (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 11
continent of America, and either subdue its inhabitants or carry them along with them, and in the end not leave a foot of that hemisphere in the possession of any European power. All these consequences will not indeed be immediate Neither you nor I shall live to see them; but for be ing remote they are not less sure. The moderate men among British statesmen saw Nov. no less clearly that the king's policy was forcing independence upon the colonies. On the first of November the Duke of Manchester said to the lords: The violence of the times has wrested America from the British crown, and spurned the jewel because the setting appeared uncouth; but the debate Chap. LI.} 1775. Nov. which he opened had no effect except that Grafton took part with him, and as a consequence resigned his place as keeper of the privy seal. Every effort of the opposition was futile. On the tenth of November Richard Penn was called to the bar of the house of lords, where he bore witness in great detail t
Chatham (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 11
fame, and eagerly went about knocking for admission at every gate but the right one. He owed his rehabilitation to Rockingham, to whom he instantly proved false; Chatham would never sit with him at the council board. His career was unprosperous, from causes within himself. His powers were very much overrated; he had a feverish a kept alive in Europe the vestal fire of freedom, was at this time outside of the Chap. LI.} 1775. Nov. government, though steadily gaining political strength. Chatham, while he had life in him, was its nerve. Had Grenville been living, it would have included Grenville; it retained Rockingham, Grenville's successor; it had now recovered Grafton, Chatham's successor; and Lord North, who succeeded Grafton, sided with Germain and Sandwich only by spasms, and though he loved his place, was more against his own ministry than for it. The king's policy was not in harmony with the England of the Revolution, nor with that of the eighteenth century, nor with that
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ilure of his great speculation, had the British exchequer at their Chap. LI.} 1775. Oct. mercy. The plan of the coming campaign was made in the undoubting expectation of completely finishing the war in season to disband the extraordinary forces within two years. For the Russians, who were to have protected the city and province of Quebec, Germans were to be substituted, whatever might be the cost. The advantage of keeping possession of Boston as a means of occupying the attention of New England, was considered; but it was determined to concentrate the British forces at New York, as the best means of securing the central provinces and the connection with Canada. The vaunts of Dunmore were so far heeded, that a small force of some hundred men was held sufficient, with the aid of loyalists and negroes, to recover the province. The promises of Martin led to the belief that, on the appearance of a few regiments, the Highland emigrants and many thousands in the back counties of Nort
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