hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
1776 AD 226 226 Browse Search
1775 AD 208 208 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 152 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 150 0 Browse Search
France (France) 126 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 122 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 104 0 Browse Search
Quebec (Canada) 104 0 Browse Search
John Adams 100 0 Browse Search
Richard Montgomery 100 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8. Search the whole document.

Found 256 total hits in 56 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Fort George (Canada) (search for this): chapter 12
nine subalterns and privates. Schuyler's health had declined as he approached the army. In the night a person came to his tent with false information, which he laid before a council of war; their opinion being consonant with his own, he immediately ordered a retreat, and without carefully reconnoitring the fortress, he led back the troops unmolested to the Isle aux Noix. From that station he wrote to congress: I have not enjoyed a moment's Chap. LII.} 1775. Sept. health since I left Fort George; and am now so low as not to be able to hold the pen. Should we not be able to do any thing decisively in Canada, I shall judge it best to move from this place, which is a very wet and unhealthy part of the country, unless I receive your orders to the contrary. This letter was the occasion of a large controversy in congress; his proposal to abandon Isle aux Noix was severely disapproved; it was resolved to spare neither men nor money for his army, and if the Canadians would remain neut
Montreal (Canada) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 52: The capture of Montreal. August—November, 1775. when Carleton heard of the surrender tioned at the junction of the roads to Chambly and Montreal. Additions to his force and supplies of food werevanity and rash ambition, he attempted to surprise Montreal. Dressed as was his custom when on a recruiting ty a motley party of regulars, English residents of Montreal, Canadians, and Indians, in all about five hun- he rest fled to the woods. At the barrack yard in Montreal, Prescott, a British brigadier, asked the prisonereded in assembling about nine hundred Canadians at Montreal; but a want of mutual confidence and the certaintyleton, on the last day of October embarked them at Montreal, in thirty four boats, to cross the Saint Lawrenceh the honors of war. Montgomery now hastened to Montreal as rapidly as the bad weather and worse roads woul He earnestly urged Schuyler to pass the winter at Montreal. In the midst of his unparalleled success, the he
Rhinebeck (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
teps which he believed sufficient for his promotion to a majority; failing in his pursuit and thinking himself overreached, he sold his commission in disgust and emigrated to New York. Here, in 1773, he renewed his former acquaintance with the family of Robert R. Livingston, and married his eldest daughter. Never intending to draw his sword again, studious in his habits, he wished for retirement; and his wife, whose affections he entirely possessed, willingly conformed to his tastes. At Rhinebeck a mill was built, a farm stocked, and the foundation of a new house laid, so that peaceful years seemed to await them. Montgomery was of a sanguine temperament, yet the experience of life had tinged his spirit with Chap. LII.} 1775. melancholy, and he would often say: My happiness is not lasting; but yet let us enjoy it as long as we may, and leave the rest to God. And they did enjoy life; blest with parents, brothers, sisters, and friends, their circle was always enlivened by intellig
Switzerland (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 12
perience of life had tinged his spirit with Chap. LII.} 1775. melancholy, and he would often say: My happiness is not lasting; but yet let us enjoy it as long as we may, and leave the rest to God. And they did enjoy life; blest with parents, brothers, sisters, and friends, their circle was always enlivened by intelligent conversation and the undisturbed flow of affection. The father of his wife used to say, that if American liberty should not be maintained, he would carry his family to Switzerland, as the only free country in the world. War was the dream of her grandfather alone, the aged Robert Livingston, the staunchest and most sagacious patriot of them all. In 1773, in his eighty fourth year, he foretold the conflict with England, and when his son and grandchildren smiled at his credulity, You, Robert, said he to his grandson, will live to see this country independent. At the news of the retreat of the British from Concord, the octogenarian's eye kindled with the fire of yout
Isle La Motte (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
had informed Schuyler that he should probably reach St. John's on the first day of September. Schuyler sent back no reply. Moving without your orders, rejoined Montgomery, I do not like; but the prevention of the enemy is of the utmost consequence; for if he gets his vessels into the lake, it is over with us for the present summer; and he went forward with a thousand or twelve hundred men. Retarded by violent head winds and rain, it was the Sept. third of September when he arrived at Isle La Motte. On the fourth he was joined by Schuyler, and they proceeded to Isle aux Noix. The next day a declaration of friendship was dispersed amongst the inhabitants. On the sixth Schuyler, whose forces did not exceed a thousand, embarked for St. John's. They landed without obstruction, a mile and a half from the fortress, towards which they marched in good order over marshyand wooded ground. In crossing a creek, the left of their advanced line was attacked by a party of Indians; but being p
Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
uld not be maintained, he would carry his family to Switzerland, as the only free country in the world. War was the dream of her grandfather alone, the aged Robert Livingston, the staunchest and most sagacious patriot of them all. In 1773, in his eighty fourth year, he foretold the conflict with England, and when his son and grandchildren smiled at his credulity, You, Robert, said he to his grandson, will live to see this country independent. At the news of the retreat of the British from Concord, the octogenarian's eye kindled with the fire of youth, and he confidently announced American independence. Soon after the battle of Bunker Hill, he lay calmly on his deathbed, and his last words were: What news from Boston? From such a family circle the county of Dutchess, in April, 1775, selected Montgomery as a delegate to the first provincial convention in New York, where he distinguished himself by unaffected modesty, promptness of decision, and soundness of judgment. On receiving
Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
l. Under the direction of Schuyler, boats were built Aug. at Ticonderoga as fast as possible; and his humanity brooked no delay in adoptich officers lately appointed. At the same time a new arrival at Ticonderoga changed the spirit of the camp. We have seen Richard Montgome keeping the command of Lake Champlain. Summoned by Schuyler to Ticonderoga, he was attended as far as Saratoga by his wife, whose fears he your Montgomery. On the seventeenth of August his arrival at Ticonderoga was the signal for Schuyler to depart for Saratoga, promising toate disasters; and Schuyler, who was put into a covered boat for Ticonderoga, turned his back on the scene with regret, but not with envy, anitish brigadier, asked the prisoner: Are you that Allen who took Ticonderoga? I am the very man, quoth Allen. Then Prescott, in a great rags plight, thrust into the lowest part of a vessel, the captor of Ticonderoga was dragged to England, where imprisonment in Pendennis Castle c
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
rrendered by the English commandant. The colors of the seventh regi- Chap. LII.} 1775. Oct. ment, which were here taken, were transmitted as the first trophy to congress; the prisoners, one hundred and sixty eight in number, were marched to Connecticut; but the great gain to the Americans was seventeen cannon and six tons of powder. The siege of St. John's now proceeded with efficiency. The army of Montgomery yielded more readily to his guidance; Wooster of Connecticut had arrived, and sConnecticut had arrived, and set an example of cheerful obedience to his orders. At the northwest, a battery was constructed on an eminence within two hundred and fifty yards of the fort; and by the thirtieth it was in full action. To raise the siege Carleton planned a junction with McLean; but Montgomery sent Easton, Brown, and Livingston to watch McLean, who was near the mouth of the Sorel, while Warner was stationed near Longeuil. Having by desperate exertions got together about eight hundred Indians, Canadians, and
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 12
l. His first object was to learn the state of Canada, and in Major John Brown he found a fearless, n, and reported that now was the time to carry Canada; that the inhabitants were friends; that the number of regulars in Canada was only about seven hundred, of whom three hundred were at St. John's; stly on the expediency of taking possession of Canada, as the means of guarding against Indian hosti from Washington, who urged the acquisition of Canada and explained the plan for an auxiliary enterpd we not be able to do any thing decisively in Canada, I shall judge it best to move from this placeno doubt was entertained of the acquisition of Canada. He himself was encouraged to attend to his omes Livingston of New York, then a resident in Canada, and assisted by Major Brown, with a small detitrary government should remain established in Canada; that no reconciliation could take place till olicit, and then I have done. Without Quebec, Canada remained unconquered; and honor forbade him t[2 more...]
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
himself by unaffected modesty, promptness of decision, and soundness of judgment. On receiving his appointment as brigadier general he reluctantly bade adieu to his quiet scheme of life; perhaps, he said, for ever, but the will of an oppressed people, compelled to choose between liberty and slavery, must be obeyed. On the sixth of August, from Albany, he advised Chap. LII.} 1775. Aug. that Tryon, whose secret designs he had penetrated, should be conducted out of the way of mischief to Hartford. He reasoned justly on the expediency of taking possession of Canada, as the means of guarding against Indian hostilities, and displaying to the world the strength of the confederated colonies; it was enlarging the sphere of operations, but a failure would not impair the means of keeping the command of Lake Champlain. Summoned by Schuyler to Ticonderoga, he was attended as far as Saratoga by his wife, whose fears he soothed by cheerfulness and good humor, and his last words to her at part
1 2 3 4 5 6