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Long Island City (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
but caprices, implying momentary treachery rather than a well considered system. His secret was kept in America, but the statement found its way through the British ministry to Vergennes, Chap. XLII.} 1775. July. who pronounced it an absurdity worthy only of contempt. All the while skirmishes continued. A party of Americans on the eighth of July drove in the British advance guard nearest Roxbury, and took several muskets. On the evening of the tenth, three hundred volunteers swept Long Island, in Boston harbor, of more than seventy sheep and fifteen head of cattle, and carried off sixteen prisoners. Two days later, just after the arrival of six crowded transports, Greaton, with one hundred and thirty six men, went again to the same island, and burnt the hay which was stacked there for the British cavalry. After a few days more, companies at Weymouth and Hingham reaped and brought off the ripe grain from Nantasket. On the fifteenth of July, the army of Cambridge heard Langd
Berkshire (Mass.) (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
June, and July cannot be accounted for by ordinary rules. There was nothing regularly established, and yet many thousands of men were abundantly supplied. Touched by an all pervading influence, each householder esteemed himself a sort of commissary. There were no public magazines, no large dealers in provisions; but the wants of the army rung in the ears of the farmers, and from every cellar, Chap. XLII.} 1775. July. and barn yard, and field throughout Worcester and Hampshire and even Berkshire, such articles of food as could be spared were devoted to the camp, and everybody's wagons were used to forward them. But for this the forces must have dispersed; how it was done, cannot exactly be told; popular enthusiasm keeps little record of its sacrifices; only it was done, and though great waste prevailed, the troops of Massachusetts, and for a long time also those of New Hampshire, were fed by the unselfish care of the people, without so much as a barrel of flour from the continent
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 2
uniform will of Washington was steadily exerted, with a quiet, noiseless, and irresistible energy. There are many things amiss in this camp, said the chaplain Emerson; yet, upon the whole, Chap. XLII.} 1775. July. God is in the midst of us. Meantime Lee had not been many days in the camp before the British generals in Boston, who knew him well, showed a disposition to tamper with him for their own purposes. From Philadelphia he had, in June, addressed to Burgoyne, his old comrade in Portugal, a public letter condemning American taxation by parliament, and tracing the malady of the state to the corrupt influence of the crown. In an able reply, Burgoyne insisted, for himself and for Howe, that their political principles were unchanged, and invited Lee to an interview within the British lines, for the purpose of inducing such explanations as might tend in their consequences to peace, for, said he, as if with the highest authority, I know Great Britain is ready to open her arms up
Hampshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
enance during May, June, and July cannot be accounted for by ordinary rules. There was nothing regularly established, and yet many thousands of men were abundantly supplied. Touched by an all pervading influence, each householder esteemed himself a sort of commissary. There were no public magazines, no large dealers in provisions; but the wants of the army rung in the ears of the farmers, and from every cellar, Chap. XLII.} 1775. July. and barn yard, and field throughout Worcester and Hampshire and even Berkshire, such articles of food as could be spared were devoted to the camp, and everybody's wagons were used to forward them. But for this the forces must have dispersed; how it was done, cannot exactly be told; popular enthusiasm keeps little record of its sacrifices; only it was done, and though great waste prevailed, the troops of Massachusetts, and for a long time also those of New Hampshire, were fed by the unselfish care of the people, without so much as a barrel of flour
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
he was able; as from a centre, to bend them against any one point in the straggling line of their besiegers. Washington found the American army dispersed in a semicircle, from the west end of Dorchester to Maiden, a distance of nine miles. At Roxbury, where Thomas commanded two regiments of Connecticut and nine of Massachusetts, a strong work, planned by Knox and Waters, crowned the hill, and with the brokenness of the rocky ground, secured that pass. The main street was defended by a breasgh the British ministry to Vergennes, Chap. XLII.} 1775. July. who pronounced it an absurdity worthy only of contempt. All the while skirmishes continued. A party of Americans on the eighth of July drove in the British advance guard nearest Roxbury, and took several muskets. On the evening of the tenth, three hundred volunteers swept Long Island, in Boston harbor, of more than seventy sheep and fifteen head of cattle, and carried off sixteen prisoners. Two days later, just after the arriv
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
o Burgoyne, his old comrade in Portugal, a public letter condemning American taxation by parliament, and tracing the malady of the state to the corrupt influence of the crown. In an able reply, Burgoyne insisted, for himself and for Howe, that their political principles were unchanged, and invited Lee to an interview within the British lines, for the purpose of inducing such explanations as might tend in their consequences to peace, for, said he, as if with the highest authority, I know Great Britain is ready to open her arms upon the first overture of accommodation. Clutching at the office of a negotiator, Lee avoided asking advice of a council of war, and of himself requested the Massachusetts congress to depute one of their body to be a witness of what should pass. That body wisely dissuaded from the meeting, and referred him to a council of war for further advice. Thwarted in his purpose, Lee publicly declined to meet Burgoyne, but he also sent him a secret communication, in w
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
and. The provincial congress at Watertown welcomed him in a cordial address. From Philadelphia, Hancock expressed the wish to serve under him; Greene and the Rhode Island officers received him with words of affectionate confidence. Now be strong and very courageous, wrote Trumbull, the governor of Connecticut; may the God of thd well-pointed trees, placed with the top towards Boston, prevented the approach of light horse. A breastwork also crossed the road to Dorchester. The men of Rhode Island were partly on Winter Hill, partly at Sewall's Farm, near the south bank of the Charles. The centre of the army was with Ward at Cambridge, its lines reachinge than fourteen thousand five hundred fit for duty. The community in arms presented a motley spectacle. In dress there was no uniformity. The companies from Rhode Island were furnished with tents, and had the appearance of regular troops; others filled the college halls, the episcopal church, and private houses; the fields were
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
tre of the army was with Ward at Cambridge, its lines reaching from the colleges almost to the river. Putnam, with a division of four thousand men, composed of troops from Connecticut and eight Massachusetts regiments, lay intrenched on Prospect Hill, in a position which was thought to be impregnable. The New Hampshire forces were fortifying Winter Hill; assisted perhaps by a Rhode Island regiment, and certainly by Poor's Massachusetts regiment, which for want of tents had its quarters in Medford. The smaller posts and sentinels stretched beyond Maiden river. Apart, in a very thick wood, near where the Charles enters the bay, stood the wigwams of about fifty domiciliated Indians of the Stockbridge tribe. Chap. XLII.} 1775. July. They were armed with bows and arrows, as well as guns, and were accompanied by their squaws and littie ones. The American rolls promised seventeen thousand men; but Washington never had more than fourteen thousand five hundred fit for duty. The commu
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
e of Washington, and expressions of admiring gratitude from the congress in Massachusetts. Gates, who arrived within a week, gained friends by his affability, and hAt Roxbury, where Thomas commanded two regiments of Connecticut and nine of Massachusetts, a strong work, planned by Knox and Waters, crowned the hill, and with the ivision of four thousand men, composed of troops from Connecticut and eight Massachusetts regiments, lay intrenched on Prospect Hill, in a position which was thoughtington Chap XLII.} 1775. July. made allowances for a devoted province like Massachusetts, which had so long suffered from anarchy and oppression. Their spirit, sai In conformity to the direction of the continental congress, the people of Massachusetts, holding town meetings according to their usage and their charter, chose acrifices; only it was done, and though great waste prevailed, the troops of Massachusetts, and for a long time also those of New Hampshire, were fed by the unselfish
Squantum (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
e wished to share his confinement. He sent officers to New York to board emigrant ships from Scotland, in the hope to enlist a few Highlanders. Growing more and more uneasy, on the twenty fourth of July, he wrote home that Boston was the most disadvantageous place for all operations, and he wished himself safely at New York. To repair the Boston lighthouse carpenters were sent with a guard of thirty marines. On the evening of the thirtieth, Major Tupper attacked them with a party from Squantum and Dorchester, killed the lieutenant and one man, and captured all the rest of the party, fifty three in number. The Americans had but one man killed and two or three wounded. The next day in general orders, Washington praised their gallant and soldier like conduct. The country regarded with amazement what Jefferson called the adventurous genius and intrepidity of the New Englanders. For all this, Washington, who was annoyed by shoals of selfish importuners, and had not yet become awa
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